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Oracle Work in Process User's Guide
Release 12.1
Part Number E13678-04
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Non-Standard Discrete Jobs

This chapter explains the differences between non-standard and standard discrete jobs and illustrates how non-standard discrete jobs can be used.

This chapter covers the following topics:

Overview of Non-Standard Discrete Jobs

Non-standard discrete jobs can be used to control materials and resources and to collect costs for a wide variety of miscellaneous manufacturing activities such as rework, field service repair, upgrade, disassembly, maintenance, and engineering prototypes.

Assemblies

You can optionally assign an assembly to a non-standard job. For example, if you are using a non-standard job to rework assemblies, you can identify those assemblies on the job. On the other hand, if you are using a non-standard job to track machine maintenance, you do not have to associate the job with an assembly.

Quantities

You can choose whether to specify a job quantity on a non-standard job. The job quantity enables you to track the assemblies on the shop floor and to plan supplies. You cannot define a job quantity if you have not defined an assembly for the non-standard job.

Bills of Material and Routings

You can assign bills of material and routings to non-standard discrete jobs, or you can create them manually. You can assign any bill or routing including one that does not match the assembly item of the job.

Transactions

You can perform move, issue, backflush, resource, scrap, and completion transactions on non-standard discrete jobs with assemblies. For non-standard jobs without assemblies, you can only do issue and resource transactions.

Planning Options

You can specify how Oracle Planning applications plans material requirements and job quantities. For each material requirement on a non-standard job, you can use the MRP Net field to specify whether MRP includes the requirement as a demand. For the assembly, you can specify the MRP net quantity as the number of assemblies you expect the non-standard job to supply on the completion date of the job.

Asset and Expense Accounting Class

You can define asset accounting classes for non-standard discrete jobs you want to carry as an asset during the life of the job. Asset classes are costed on a job basis. You can also define expense accounting classes for non-standard jobs you want to expense during each accounting period.

Job Close

You can manually close non-standard jobs whenever you choose. The system automatically performs an accounting close for non-standard jobs with expense type accounting classes on a periodic basis during the period close process.

Job Costs

You can charge, value, and report the standard costs of material, material overhead, resources, resource overhead, and outside processing for non-standard discrete jobs. You can charge resource and outside processing at actual cost. Non-standard jobs with expense type accounting classes are not subject to revaluation at cost update. Non-standard jobs do not earn material overhead on Completions.

Project Non-Standard Jobs

If Project Manufacturing is implemented, you can use project non-standard jobs in the same way that you use common non-standard jobs.

Related Topics

Overview of Discrete Manufacturing

Discrete Accounting Classes

Defining Discrete Jobs Manually

Project Jobs

Overview of Discrete Job Close

Overview of Material Control

Overview of Shop Floor Control

Charging Resources Manually

Standard Versus Non-Standard Discrete Jobs

Non-standard jobs are similar to standard jobs, however, there are noteworthy differences including:

The following table illustrates the differences between non-standard and standard discrete jobs.

Job Field Values Standard Discrete Job Non-Standard Discrete Job
Name Required Required
Type Required Required
Description Optional Optional
Assembly Required Optional. Enter if you want to perform move and/or completion transactions.
Job Class Required Required
Status Required Required
Quantity Required Required. You can enter 0. Enter a positive number if you want to perform move and/or completion transactions.
MRP Net Qty Required. Defaults from Quantity. Required. Defaults from Quantity. If you do not enter an assembly then you cannot enter a value in this field.
Start Date Required Required. If a routing exists for the job, then you can enter either a start or a completion date. Otherwise, you must enter both a start and completion date.
Completion Date Required Required. If a routing exists for the job, then you can enter either a start or a completion date. Otherwise, you must enter both a start and completion date.
Firm Required. Defaults to Yes if item is MPS planned. Otherwise, defaults to No. You cannot enter a value in this field. Defaults to No.
Lot Number Optional Optional
Routing Reference You cannot enter a value in this field. Optional. Enter a value if you want to perform job scheduling based on a routing.
Alt. Routing Optional Optional
Revision Optional Optional. You must enter a value in this field if you have a routing for the assembly.
Revision Date Optional Optional. You must enter a value in this field if you have a routing for the assembly.
Completion Sub. Optional Optional
Completion Locator Optional Optional
Bill Reference You cannot enter a value in this field. Optional. Enter a value if you want to automatically create material requirements based on a bill of materials.
Alt. Bill Optional Optional
Revision Optional Optional. You must enter a value in this field if you have a bill for the assembly.
Revision Date Optional Optional. You must enter a value in this field if you have a bill for the assembly.
Supply Type Required. Defaults to Based on bill. Required. Defaults to Based on bill.

Business Scenarios

Non-standard discrete jobs are very flexible and can be used to control a wide variety of manufacturing activities. The following sections provide various business scenarios that explain how non-standard discrete jobs can be used to manage rework, field service repairs, upgrades, disassembly, maintenance, and engineering prototypes.

Rework Assemblies

Business Example

You are a chair manufacturer that has rejected a lot of 100 completed chairs due to an overly glossy finish. You have decided to rework these chairs on a non-standard discrete job.

Assumptions

You have 100 rejected chair assemblies in a non-nettable Material Review Board (MRB) subinventory.

Since this type of rework occurs frequently, your manufacturing engineers have already defined standard rework operations for stripping, sanding, repainting, and reinspection with appropriate resources.

Setup

Use the Discrete Jobs window to define a non-standard discrete job for the chair assembly with a job quantity of 100. Since it is highly likely that you will be 100% successful in reworking the chairs, enter 100 in the MRP Net Quantity field. Select an asset type non-standard accounting class since you are building up an asset.

Use the Operations window to manually create a routing for the stripping, sanding, repainting, and reinspection operations needed.

Use the Material Requirements window to manually create the only component requirement (the chair assembly) at the stripping operation. Enter Push as the supply Type since you will likely push the assembly to the stripping operation, and specify the supply subinventory as the MRB subinventory. Do not check MRP Net if you do not want to create demand for items that are supplied from a non-nettable subinventory.

Print the Discrete Job Pick List Report and release the job using the Discrete Jobs window. Or release the job and use the Component Pick Release window to select requirements and generate move orders.

Transactions

Use the WIP Material Transactions window to issue the chair assembly to the non-standard discrete job. Use the Move Transactions window to move the chairs from operation to operation and to charge resources and overhead.

Use the Completion Transactions window to complete the perfectly finished chairs into a nettable finished goods inventory.

Costing

When all the chairs are completed, the job status changes to Complete. Your cost accountants can run a Discrete Job Value Report to check all the charges.

The job must have an ending balance equal to the cost of the resource and overhead charges only. The material charges for the chair assemblies net to a zero balance because the only material on the job was the chair assemblies that you issued to and completed from the job. Ending resource and overhead charge balances are written off as a variance when you close the job.

Related Topics

Defining Discrete Jobs Manually

Adding and Updating Material Requirements

Issuing and Returning All Push Components

Performing Move Transactions

Completing and Returning Assemblies

Overview of Discrete Job Close

Using the Component Pick Release Window

Upgrade Assemblies

Business Example

You are a computer manufacturer that wants to upgrade some printed circuit boards from an older revision to the now current revision. You have decided to upgrade these assemblies from revision A to revision C on a non-standard discrete job.

Assumptions

You have 100 revision A printed circuit board assemblies in a non-nettable spare parts subinventory. From past upgrade efforts, your manufacturing engineers expect 90% success in the upgrade.

For this upgrade effort, your manufacturing engineers have defined an alternate bill of material for the revision C of the printed circuit board. This alternate bill, named UpgradeToC, includes all the items that are required for revision C that are not in revision A. In other words, this alternate bill is the upgrade kit.

Since upgrades such as this occur frequently, your manufacturing engineers have defined an alternate routing, named Upgrade. This routing includes all the standard printed circuit board upgrade operations including remove, replace, test1, and test2.

Setup

Use the Discrete Jobs window to define a non-standard discrete job for revision C of the printed circuit board assembly with a job quantity of 100. Since you expect that 90% success when the rework is complete, enter 90 in the MRP Net Quantity field rather than the job quantity. Select an asset type non-standard accounting class since you are building up an asset.

Enter the printed circuit board and the Upgrade alternate routing into the Routing Reference and Alternate Routing fields respectively to schedule the start and end dates of the job and to create the WIP operations and resources. Enter the printed circuit board assembly and the UpgradeToC alternate bill in the Bill Reference and Alternate Bill fields respectively in order to get the upgrade kit components onto the non-standard discrete job.

Use the Material Requirements window to manually create the component requirement for the printed circuit board. The printed circuit board will likely be a push component at the remove operation. For the printed circuit board, do not check MRP Net since you do not want to create demand for items that are supplied from a non-nettable subinventory. Since the upgrade kit components are supplied from nettable subinventories, check MRP Net for these items.

Print the Discrete Job Pick List Report and release the job using the Discrete Jobs window. Or release the job and use the Component Pick Release window to select requirements and generate move orders.

Transactions

Use the WIP Material Transactions window to issue the printed circuit board and upgrade kit components to the non-standard discrete job.

Use the Move Transactions window to move the printed circuit boards from operation to operation and to charge resources and overheads. You can also use the Move Transactions window to scrap unfixable printed circuit boards.

Use the Completion Transactions window to complete the finished Revision C printed circuit boards into a nettable finished goods inventory.

Costing

When all the printed circuit boards are completed or scrapped, the job status changes to Complete. Your cost accountants can run a Discrete Job Value Report to check all the charges.

The job must have costs incurred equal to the standard cost of the printed circuit board assemblies, plus the cost of the upgrade kit material, plus the standard or actual cost of resources charged, and the standard cost of overhead charged. The costs relieved from the job equal the standard cost of the completed and scrapped printed circuit board assemblies. The balance is written off as a variance when you close the job.

Related Topics

Defining Discrete Jobs Manually

Adding and Updating Material Requirements

Charging Resources Manually

Issuing and Returning All Push Components

Performing Move Transactions

Completing and Returning Assemblies

Overview of Discrete Job Close

Using the Component Pick Release Window

Disassemble Assemblies

Business Example

You are a custom bicycle manufacturer that has received a cancellation for a custom bike you have recently completed. You have decided to disassemble this bike into its major components so that you can reuse these components on future custom orders. Use a non-standard discrete job to disassemble the bike.

Assumptions

You have one completed custom bicycle in a nettable finished goods (FGI) subinventory. Your manufacturing engineers have set up a standard operation to disassemble bicycles, called Disassembly, with a single direct charge resource, called Tech1.

Setup

Use the Discrete Jobs window to define a non-standard discrete job for the bicycle assembly with a job quantity of 1. Since you will not be receiving any finished bicycles as a supply, enter zero in the MRP Net Quantity field rather than the job quantity. Select an expense type non-standard accounting class since you are not building up WIP assets. Use a class with accounts that correspond to the appropriate expense accruals.

Use the Operations window to manually create a single operation routing with the Disassembly standard operation as the only operation.

Use the Material Requirements window to manually create the component requirements. The first requirement must be the bicycle assembly itself at the Disassembly operation. Enter Push as the supply Type since you will likely push the bicycle assembly to the Disassembly operation and enter the FGI subinventory in the Supply Subinventory field. Check MRP Net since you want to create demand for a bicycle that is supplied from the nettable FGI subinventory.

Further, you must create negative component requirements for each of the major components you expect to return to inventory from the bicycle including the frame, seat, handlebars, crank set, wheels, and tires. For these components, check MRP Net so that the MRP planning process sees these negative demands as supply.

Print the Discrete Job Pick List Report and release the job using the Discrete Jobs window. Or release the job and use the Component Pick Release window to select requirements and generate move orders.

Transactions

Use the WIP Material Transactions window to issue the bicycle to the non-standard discrete job.

Use the Resource Transactions window to charge resource time incurred during the dismantling process.

Use the WIP Material Transactions window to return the frame, seat, wheels, and so on to inventory as you dismantle the bicycle. These return transactions fill the negative requirements you created using the Update Requirements window. Do not use the Completion Transactions window since there is nothing to complete.

Costing

When the disassembly process is over and all the components have been returned to inventory, you must change the job status to Cancelled-no charges. The cost accountants can run a Discrete Job Value Report to check all the charges.

The job must have an ending balance equal to the resource and overhead costs incurred during assembly and disassembly and any outside processing costs incurred during assembly. The costs of materials issued and returned must be equal since all the components of the bicycle were returned to inventory. The resource, overhead, and outside processing costs are written off as a variance when you close the job or at period end when expense type non-standard jobs are automatically expensed.

Related Topics

Defining Discrete Jobs Manually

Adding and Updating Material Requirements

Charging Resources Manually

Issuing and Returning All Push Components

Performing Move Transactions

Completing and Returning Assemblies

Overview of Discrete Job Close

Using the Component Pick Release Window

Build Engineering Prototypes

You can define prototype bills of material in two ways. The first is to use engineering change orders (ECO) to define future revisions to items on a bill. The second is to create a new engineering item and bill.

In either case, you may build a small quantity of these new structures to validate the design. You can use non-standard jobs to manage the prototype build process for both future revisions and new engineering items.

Business Example #1 - Future Revision of an Existing Item

You are an automotive parts manufacturer that wants to build a batch of fuel filter prototypes for next year's model. These fuel filters are only slightly revised from this year's models and are defined as a future unreleased revision rather than as a new item. You have decided to build these prototype assemblies on a non-standard discrete job.

Assumptions

Your manufacturing engineers have used engineering change orders to define a future open bill of material for the fuel filters with a revision identifier of 95 and revision date of 01-Jan. You can build the 95 revision in the regular fuel filter production area on a standard fuel filter routing. The engineers may modify the routing on the fly during the build process. Cost accounting has not performed a cost rollup for this future version of the fuel filter.

Setup

Use the Discrete Jobs window to define a non-standard discrete job for the fuel filter assembly, revision 95 with a revision date of 01-Jan, with a job quantity of 10. Since none of these prototypes will be available as supply, enter zero in the MRP Net Quantity field rather than the job quantity. Select an expense type non-standard accounting class since you are performing engineering activities. Use a class with accounts that correspond to your engineering prototype expense accruals.

Enter the current routing into the Routing Reference field to schedule the start and end dates of the job and to create the WIP operations and resources.

Enter the 95 revision with the revision date of 01-Jan into the Bill Revision and Revision Date fields respectively to get the correct component requirements into the non-standard discrete job. You must have the WIP:Exclude ECOs profile option set to None to allow you to define jobs for open revisions.

Print the Discrete Job Pick List Report and release the job using the Discrete Jobs window. Or release the job and use the Component Pick Release window to select requirements and generate move orders.

Transactions

Use the WIP Material Transactions window to issue the components to the non-standard discrete job.

Use the Move and Resource Transactions windows to move the fuel filters from operation to operation and to charge resources and overheads. You can also use these windows to add either operations or resources as needed.

Use the Completion Transactions window to complete revision 95 of the finished fuel filters into a non-nettable engineering prototypes inventory.

Costing

When all the fuel filters are completed or scrapped, the job status changes to Complete. Your cost accountants can run a Discrete Job Value Report to check all the charges.

The job must have an ending balance equal to the cost of material, resources and overhead charges less the current standard cost for the completed fuel filters (since this future version is not the current standard). The balance is written off as a variance when you close the job or at period end when expense type non-standard jobs are automatically expensed.

Business Example #2 - Engineering Items

You are an automotive parts manufacturer that wants to build a batch of fuel filter prototypes for a brand new model. These fuel filters are a brand new engineering item that does not meet the same window, fit, or function of any item. You have decided to build these prototype assemblies on a non-standard discrete job.

Assumptions

Your manufacturing engineers have defined a new engineering item bill of material for the fuel filters with a revision identifier of 95A and revision date of 01-Jan. You can build the new item in the regular fuel filter production area on a standard fuel filter routing. The engineers modify the routing on the fly during the build process. Cost accounting has not performed a cost rollup or a cost update for this new engineering fuel filter.

Setup

Use the Discrete Jobs window to define a non-standard discrete job for the engineering fuel filter assembly, revision 95A with a revision date of 01-Jan, with a job quantity of 10. Since none of these prototypes will be available as supply, enter zero in the MRP Net Quantity field rather than the job quantity. Select an expense type non-standard accounting class since you are performing engineering activities. Use a class with accounts that correspond to your engineering prototype expense accruals.

Enter the standard fuel filter into the Routing Reference field to schedule the start and end dates of the job and to create the WIP operations and resources.

Enter the 95A revision with the revision date of 01-Jan into the Bill Revision and Revision Date fields respectively to get the correct component requirements into the non-standard discrete job. You must have the WIP:See Engineering Items profile option set to Yes to allow you to define jobs for engineering items.

Print the Discrete Job Pick List Report and release the job using the Discrete Jobs window. Or release the job and use the Component Pick Release window to select requirements and generate move orders.

Transactions

Use the WIP Material Transactions window to issue the components to the non-standard discrete job.

Use the Move and Resource Transactions windows to move the fuel filters from operation to operation and to charge resources and overheads. You can also use these windows to add either operation or resources as needed.

Use the Completion Transactions window to complete revision 95A of the finished engineering fuel filters into a non-nettable engineering prototypes inventory.

Costing

When all the fuel filters are completed or scrapped, the job status changes to Complete. Your cost accountants can run a Discrete Job Value Report to check all the charges.

The job must have an ending balance equal to the cost of material, resources and overhead charges. No costs were relieved from the job by the completion transaction since the costs of the engineering fuel filter have never been rolled up or updated. The job balance is written off as a variance when you close the job or at period end when expense type non-standard jobs are automatically written off.

Related Topics

Defining Discrete Jobs Manually

Adding and Updating Material Requirements

Charging Resources Manually

Issuing and Returning All Push Components

Performing Move Transactions

Completing and Returning Assemblies

Overview of Discrete Job Close

Using the Component Pick Release Window

Track Other Projects

Business Example

You are a contract electronics manufacturer who can charge customers for design services as well as production services. You have decided to track their design service projects using non-standard discrete jobs.

Assumptions

Your manufacturing engineers have already set up a dummy item, named Design_Project, with a number of alternate routings for various types of design projects. In this case, Project7 is the alternate routing that most closely matches this specific project.

You can use the Operations window to modify this standard routing to exactly match the major tasks (operations) and responsibilities (resources) for this specific project.

Setup

Use the Discrete Jobs window to define a non-standard discrete job with no assembly and a job quantity of zero. There is no need for an assembly since you will not be moving or completing anything. Select an expense type non-standard accounting class since you are performing project activities. Use a class with accounts that correspond to your project accruals. Use the job name and description to identify the specific customer and design contract.

Enter the Design_Project item and the Project7 alternate routing into the Routing Reference and Alternate Routing fields respectively to create the WIP operations and resources. Since you will not be making moves, the purpose of this routing is to serve as a task reference list and charging point for the individuals who are performing this project.

Print the Discrete Job Pick List Report and release the job using the Discrete Jobs window. Or release the job and use the Component Pick Release window to select requirements and generate move orders.

Transactions

Use the Resource Transactions window to charge resources time incurred during the life of the project. You can charge at a standard rate or a rate based on the specifics of your contract.

Use the Move or Resource Transactions windows, or the Operations window to modify the operations or resources as required for this particular project.

Use the WIP Material Transactions window to issue any items that the project might require.

Costing

Since you will do this project over several periods, you can leave this job open for as long as you want. The job must have an ending balance equal to the material, resource, and overhead charges incurred during any period. The cost accountants must run a Discrete Job Value report each period to review the charges and bill the customer. The job balance is written off as a variance when you close the job or at period end when expense type non-standard jobs are automatically expensed.