Chapter 15. MySQL Enterprise Monitor

Table of Contents

15.1. Overview of the Service
15.1.1. The Service Architecture
15.1.2. Service Features
15.1.3. Security
15.2. Conventions Used in This Document
15.3. Installation and Upgrades
15.3.1. User Roles
15.3.2. Service Manager Installation
15.3.3. Monitor Agent Installation
15.3.4. Unattended Installation
15.3.5. Postinstallation Considerations
15.3.6. Upgrading, Re-Installing or Changing Your Installation
15.3.7. Uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Monitor
15.4. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard
15.4.1. The Server Tree
15.4.2. The Server Graphs and Critical Events
15.4.3. The Heat Chart
15.5. The Settings Page
15.5.1. Global Settings
15.5.2. User Preferences
15.5.3. Manage Servers
15.5.4. Managing Users
15.5.5. Manage Notification Groups
15.5.6. Logs
15.5.7. The Product Information Screen
15.6. The What's New Page
15.6.1. Setting What's New Configuration
15.7. The Advisors Page
15.7.1. Installing and Updating Advisors
15.7.2. Scheduling Rules
15.7.3. Editing Built-in Rules
15.7.4. Creating Advisors and Rules
15.7.5. Creating a Custom Data Collection Item
15.7.6. Disabling and Unscheduling Rules
15.7.7. Advisor Blackout Periods
15.8. The Events Page
15.8.1. Closing an Event
15.8.2. Notification of Events
15.9. The Graphs Page
15.9.1. Displaying Graphs
15.9.2. Setting an Interval
15.9.3. Setting a Time Span
15.10. The Query Analyzer Page
15.10.1. Enabling Query Analyzer
15.10.2. Getting Detailed Query Information
15.10.3. Using Graphs to Identify Queries
15.10.4. Filtering Query Analyzer Data
15.10.5. Using Query Analyzer Data
15.10.6. Troubleshooting Query Analyzer
15.10.7. Query Analyzer Settings
15.11. The Replication Page
15.11.1. Replication Page Details
15.12. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Reference
15.12.1. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Limitations
15.12.2. Supported Browsers
15.12.3. Installation Requirements
15.12.4. Creating a new SSL KeyStore
15.12.5. Choosing Suitable MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Hardware Configurations
15.12.6. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Reference
15.12.7. Configuring Tomcat Parameters
15.12.8. Backing up MySQL Enterprise Service Manager
15.12.9. Migrating 1.3.x Historical Data to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0
15.12.10. Regular MySQL Enterprise Monitor Maintenance
15.12.11. Advisor/Graph Reference
15.13. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Frequently Asked Questions
Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor serves as an automated assistant for MySQL database administrators. This service is designed to help administrators with their day-to-day tasks by monitoring MySQL servers and identifying potential problems. These features are designed to save the database administrator's time and effort by providing the information you need through a simplified interface.

An extension of existing MySQL Enterprise services, MySQL Enterprise Monitor monitors enterprise database environments and provides expert advice on how customers can tighten security and optimize the performance and uptime of their MySQL servers.

MySQL Enterprise Monitor helps administrators:

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor was designed to tackle the job of managing the performance of any number of MySQL database servers, regardless of their physical or geographical location. Although MySQL Enterprise Monitor can easily track just a handful of MySQL servers, the service is specifically designed to greatly curtail the time it takes to get a handle on the availability and performance levels of many database servers at once.

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor does this by providing an web-based interface—called the Enterprise Dashboard—that serves as the portal for viewing information about your MySQL database servers. MySQL professionals can manage all their servers by group or individually if need be.

The Enterprise Dashboard web interface does not have to be installed on individual desktops, but is instead available from a centrally located machine that serves as the main location for the Monitoring and Advisory service.

15.1. Overview of the Service

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor is a collection of components that work together to monitor and help administer your MySQL server installations. This service includes server management agents, advisors, and a central MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, all working in tandem with the MySQL Enterprise to keep your MySQL servers secure and up to date. All of this is controlled through the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard—a lightweight web-based interface that gives you complete control of your MySQL servers from any location.

Figure 15.1. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Architecture

MySQL Enterprise Monitor Architecture

The service is made up of a number of components, including the Monitor Agent (MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent), the Service Manager (MySQL Enterprise Service Manager), the Enterprise Dashboard, the Repository and the Advisors.

15.1.1. The Service Architecture

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor is powered by a distributed web-based application that is deployed within the confines of the corporate firewall. The Enterprise Dashboard provides the interface to the server data, advisor notifications, live information and communication with the MySQL Enterprise Update Service.

Subscribers are kept up to date about the latest releases of the MySQL server or issues that may affect their specific implementation of MySQL by using the MySQL Enterprise Update Service. This same mechanism is used to notify MySQL Enterprise Monitor users of updates to the application or to the MySQL Advisors and Rules. The various components are described below.

  • Monitor Agent

    Monitor Agents are the foot soldiers of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor; they monitor each MySQL server. Running as a Windows service or Unix daemon, the Agent uses a combination of MySQL specific commands, SQL queries, and custom scripts to collect and report MySQL server or operating system (OS) specific data. The Monitor Agent initiates a “heartbeat” to the Service Manager on a regular basis to ensure specific MySQL server and OS level data collections are current.

    In the overall architecture, the Monitor Agent is the only component of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor that establishes or maintains a connection with the monitored MySQL Server. As with any MySQL client, the Monitor Agent is authenticated on the monitored MySQL server and requires a user name and password to establish a connection.

    In addition, the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent also provides a proxy service that allows for information about queries to be captured and reported as part of the Query Analyzer functionality. The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent accepts client connections and forwards the SQL statements on to the server and returns the results. In the background, the agent is collecting information about the query execution, row counts, times and other data so that queries and their execution can be monitored.

  • Service Manager

    The Service Manager is the heart and soul of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor. It is built on a collection of Java services hosted on a single Windows or Unix server. The Service Manager interacts with all of the Monitor Agents under its domain to collect MySQL server and OS level data for each of the monitored MySQL servers.

    The Service Manager performs many duties including:

    • Enterprise Dashboard, the main interface to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

    • Autodiscovery of monitored MySQL Servers.

    • Creation and management of Monitor Agent tasks.

    • Storage of data collections from Monitor Agents.

    • Monitoring of key MySQL server and OS level metric data collections.

    • Reporting MySQL best practice events and violations.

    • Providing MySQL expert advice for MySQL best practice violations.

    • Autodiscovery of replication topology (Not available for all subscription levels)

  • The Repository

    The Repository is built on MySQL 5.0.x and is used to store MySQL server and OS level data collections for each of the monitored MySQL Servers. This information is used by the Service Manager to evaluate and report the health and status of the monitored MySQL environment(s).

  • The Enterprise Dashboard

    The MySQL Enterprise web client provides the graphical user interface (GUI) for the MySQL Enterprise Monitor. This interface is the primary means of monitoring the state of your MySQL servers, identifying rule violations and providing advice on how best to address and correct any underlying issues.

    This interface also provides an easy means of configuring advisors, adding users, creating notification groups, and receiving updates from MySQL Enterprise.

15.1.2. Service Features

The key features of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor can be summarized as follows:

  • Group-level or Server-level management options

  • Enterprise Dashboard for managing all MySQL Servers from a consolidated console

  • Monitoring page for “at a glance” global health check of key systems

  • MySQL-provided Advisors and Advisor Rules for enforcing MySQL Best Practices

  • Advisor Rule Scheduling for unattended operations

  • Customizable Thresholds and Alerts for identifying Advisor Rule violations

  • User-Defined Advisor Rules

  • Event/Alert History browser for researching advisor-specific events and annotations

  • Query Analyzer functionality allowing you to monitor the execution times, row counts and other data about queries executed on your MySQL server.

These features are presented through the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard which is made up of six main pages:

  • The Monitor page comprises:

    • The Server Tree: Easily navigate monitored servers

    • The Graphing: This capability is built in so you can quickly assess critical functions such as activity, performance metrics, and number of connections

    • The Heat Chart: Color-coded buttons provide key operating system and database metrics

  • The Advisors page

    This page shows the advisors that are currently scheduled. There are advisors for a variety of topics such as security and indexing. Users can add, edit, or create their own advisors.

  • The Events page

    This page shows rule violations, indicating the server, severity, and time of occurrence. A number of filter options are available, allowing various views of events.

  • The Graphs page

    Use this page to view all the available graphs and to adjust the scale of the graphs, for a more or less detailed view as the situation requires.

  • The Query Analyzer page

  • The Replication page

    Use this page to keep track of your masters and their slaves (Not available for all subscription levels)

  • The Settings page

    On this page you configure servers, users, email addresses, and notification groups. Entering a user name and password for MySQL Enterprise provides automatic updates.

15.1.3. Security

Using the Tomcat/Apache web server for the user interface allows an administrator to configure the web server to meet any security regulations. The MySQL Enterprise Monitor architecture is designed to be as secure as possible, even when monitoring systems outside of the local network.

Communications between the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent and MySQL Enterprise Service Manager can be protected by Secure Socket Layer (SSL) encryption and server and agent can use SSL certificates to provide authentication and prevent spoofing.

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent is like a web browser — it is an HTTP client application that initiates all communication with the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. If the server requires action from the agent, it must wait until the agent next initiates contact and sends its request in a response. This means you do not need to open an inbound port on the machine on which the agent is running because it does not listen for requests. However, an outbound port must be open for the agent to contact the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

As an additional security feature, each Agent can have a separate Advisory Service login which minimizes exposure should any one agent be compromised.

15.2. Conventions Used in This Document

This document uses certain typographical conventions:

  • Text in this style is used for SQL statements; database, table, and column names; program listings and source code; and environment variables. Example: “To reload the grant tables, use the FLUSH PRIVILEGES statement.

  • Text in this style indicates input that you type in examples.

  • Text in this style indicates the names of executable programs and scripts, examples being mysql (the MySQL command line client program) and mysqld (the MySQL server executable).

  • Text in this style is used for variable input for which you should substitute a value of your own choosing.

  • File names and directory names are written like this: “The global my.cnf file is located in the /etc directory.

  • Character sequences are written like this: “To specify a wildcard, use the ‘%’ character.

  • Text in this style is used for emphasis.

  • Text in this style is used in table headings and to convey especially strong emphasis.

When commands are shown that are meant to be executed from within a particular program, the prompt shown preceding the command indicates which command to use. For example, shell> indicates a command that you execute from your login shell or from the command line in Windows:

shell> type a shell command here

The “shell” is your command interpreter. On Unix, this is typically a program such as sh, csh, or bash. On Windows, the equivalent program is command.com or cmd.exe, typically run in a console window.

When you enter a command or statement shown in an example, do not type the prompt shown in the example.

Sometimes, what appears on one line in a console window cannot be represented in the documentation on a single line. In cases such as this the character ‘»’ is used. For example:

Please specify the directory where the MySQL Enterprise Monitor »
 will be installed.

Where Unix commands are concerned, the continuation character ‘\’ is used. Doing this allows commands to be copied and pasted to the command line verbatim. For example:

shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/bin/mysql-monitor-agent -f \
 /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/mysql-monitor-agent.ini

SQL keywords are not case sensitive and may be written in either case. This document uses uppercase.

In syntax descriptions, square brackets (‘[’ and ‘]’) indicate optional words or clauses. For example, in the following statement, IF EXISTS is optional:

DROP TABLE [IF EXISTS] tbl_name

When a syntax element consists of a number of alternatives, the alternatives are separated by vertical bars (‘|’). When one member from a set of choices may be chosen, the alternatives are listed within square brackets (‘[’ and ‘]’):

TRIM([[BOTH | LEADING | TRAILING] [remstr] FROM] str)

When one member from a set of choices must be chosen, the alternatives are listed within braces (‘{’ and ‘}’):

{DESCRIBE | DESC} tbl_name [col_name | wild]

An ellipsis (...) indicates the omission of a section of a statement, typically to provide a shorter version of more complex syntax. For example, INSERT ... SELECT is shorthand for the form of INSERT statement that is followed by a SELECT statement.

An ellipsis can also indicate that the preceding syntax element of a statement may be repeated. In the following example, multiple reset_option values may be given, with each of those after the first preceded by commas:

RESET reset_option [,reset_option] ...

Commands for setting shell variables are shown using Bourne shell syntax. For example, the sequence to set the CC environment variable and run the configure command looks like this in Bourne shell syntax:

shell> CC=gcc ./configure

If you are using csh or tcsh, you must issue commands somewhat differently:

shell> setenv CC gcc
shell> ./configure

Throughout this document the term ‘Unix’ is used to describe any Unix or Unix-like operating system. For an up-to-date list of operating systems supported by the MySQL Enterprise Monitor please see the http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/.

15.3. Installation and Upgrades

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

This chapter describes the process of installing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor on all operating systems. A working installation requires the installation of a MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, the MySQL Enterprise Advisors and one or more MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agents. Simply described, the agent inspects the MySQL server it is monitoring, reports to the Service Manager, and the results are interpreted by the advisors and displayed in the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard for viewing in a web browser.

One Monitor Agent is installed for each MySQL server that is being monitored. The Monitor Agent usually runs on the same machine that hosts the monitored MySQL server but it may run on any machine that has access to both the monitored MySQL server and the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard. The agent reports its findings to the Service Manager and these results are interpreted by Advisors and displayed in the dashboard. The end user opens a web browser to view the information presented in the dashboard. The Service Manager and dashboard run on the same machine and both have access to a local MySQL server installed as part of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor. This server is known as the repository and provides storage for the data provided by the agent.

Installation is a three step process:

  1. Install and start the Service Manager on the monitoring system. See Section 15.3.2, “Service Manager Installation”.

  2. Configure the Service Manager, see Section 15.3.3, “Monitor Agent Installation”.

  3. Start the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent instances, and then use the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard to install the Advisors and complete the configuration and installation. See Section 15.3.2.7, “MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Configuration Settings and Advisor Installation”.

Depending on your configuration and environment, you will need to download a number of different components and files from MySQL Enterprise website available on the download page. These include:

  • MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and MySQL Enterprise Dashboard for the platform that you intend to execute the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager on. These are named mysqlmonitor-2.1.0.1096-linux-x86_64-installer.bin, with the appropriate version and platform name. If you are performing an upgrade, download the upgrade installer, named mysqlmonitor-2.1.0.1096-linux-x86_64-update-installer.bin.

  • One or more MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent, one for each MySQL Server that you want to monitor. You should download an installer package for the right platform for the MySQL server you want to manage. Agent installers are available with the name mysqlmonitoragent-2.1.0.1093-linux-debian3.1-powerpc-installer.bin. Upgrade installers to update an existing MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent installation are named mysqlmonitoragent-2.1.0.1093-linux-debian3.1-powerpc-update-installer.bin.

  • Optional

    A product key file for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. If your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager has internet connectivity, your product key can be downloaded automatically during the initial phase of configuration directly from the MySQL Enterprise website. For more information, see Section 15.3.2.7, “MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Configuration Settings and Advisor Installation”.

  • Optional

    An advisor bundle equal to the level of your MySQL Enterprise subscriptiion (Platinum, Gold, or Silver), which is required for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. If your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager has internet connectivity, your advisor bundle can be downloaded automatically during the initial phase of configuration directly from the MySQL Enterprise website. For more information, see Section 15.3.2.7, “MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Configuration Settings and Advisor Installation”.

For information on the installation requirements for different platforms, see Section 15.12.3, “Installation Requirements”.

15.3.1. User Roles

Prior to installation you will need to have at hand credentials for access to the MySQL server you plan to monitor and also your MySQL Enterprise credentials. During installation and when first logging in, you will set up a variety of users with different roles and credentials. This can become confusing. This section outlines the various users associated with the MySQL Enterprise Monitor and gives a brief description of their roles.

15.3.1.1. Existing Users

The MySQL Enterprise user: These are the credentials you use to log in to the MySQL Enterprise web site. You will need them to acquire the Advisor files and receive updates and, if necessary, acquire a product key.

The MySQL user: For Monitor Agents to report the status of a MySQL server they must have privileges on that server. To perform all functions an agent must have SHOW DATABASES, REPLICATION CLIENT, SUPER, CREATE, and SELECT privileges. In short, the Monitor Agent needs to have read access to all data. Details about this account are given in Section 15.3.3.1, “Creating a MySQL User Account for the Monitor Agent”.

15.3.1.2. User Created During Installation

The Repository user: This user is the only user in the user table in the mysql database in the bundled MySQL server. To avoid confusion with monitored MySQL servers, this server is referred to throughout this document as the repository. The repository user can log in from localhost using the password specified during installation and has all privileges on all databases. These credentials are used to create the repository and its tables and to record data in them. During installation the default value for the user name for this role is service_manager. No default password is specified. You can use these credentials to manage the repository from the command line or when using a program such as MySQL Administrator.

During installation the file configuration_report.txt is created. Reference this file for the credentials of the repository manager. After the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is installed, look for this file in the following directories:

  • Windows: C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Monitor

  • Unix: /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor

  • Mac OS X: /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor

15.3.1.3. Users Created on First Log-in

The Root user: This user is the administrator of the dashboard. The first time you log in to the dashboard you must log in as this user. The default user name for this user is admin. There is no default password for this user.

The Agent user: The Monitor Agent needs to report the status of the MySQL server it is monitoring. For this reason it needs to log in to the dashboard. The default user name for this user is agent. There is no default password for this user.

Note

The Monitor Agent has two roles in the MySQL Enterprise Monitor; it must have access to the dashboard and to the MySQL server it is monitoring. For a description of the agent as a MySQL user see Section 15.3.1.1, “Existing Users”.

15.3.2. Service Manager Installation

The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is the core element of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor. The installation process for this element is completely self-contained, but the installation includes the following components:

  • Apache Tomcat

  • MySQL Server

  • Java VM

Note

After installation you can determine the version number of the various components by entering http://server_name:18080/main?command=list_versions into the web browsers address bar.

During installation, versions of MySQL and Tomcat will be installed onto the machine. The installer automatically provides default network ports that are different from standard installation for these applications. You can change the ports during installation.

During installation, default values are shown for user names and ports. This is for your convenience only; you may choose different values. The installer detect ports that are already in use and allows you to select different ports.

Warning

The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager version 2.0 requires agents using 2.0 or higher.

All the installations share the same basic configuration parameters that you will be asked to confirm during installation. Before you start your installation, please review the section on these common paramaters, then proceed to section specific to your installation platform. For details of the common parameters, see Section 15.3.2.1, “Service Manager Installation Common Parameters”. For information on installation under Windows, see Section 15.3.2.2, “Service Manager Installation on Windows”, for Mac OS X see Section 15.3.2.3, “Service Manager Installation on Mac OS X”, and for Unix/Linux, see Section 15.3.2.4, “Service Manager Installation on Unix”.

15.3.2.1. Service Manager Installation Common Parameters

All installations of the Service Manager install the Tomcat and MySQL applications using the same basic set of parameters. The defaults provided by the installation process are designed to be unique so that they do not interfere with existing installations of either product. However, you should check these parameters before installation to ensure that you do not experience any problems.

The common parameters are divided into those applying to the Tomcat server, and the MySQL server (Repository Configuration):

  • Tomcat Server Options

    • Tomcat Server port: The default port that the Tomcat server will use when listening for connections. If you change this option, then the port that you need to use when connecting to the Service Manager must be modified accordingly. The default value is 18080.

      Note

      If you are not currently running a web server on port 80 you may find it more convenient to use the well known port rather than 18080. Since port 80 is the default for a web server, you can then open the dashboard without specifying a port.

    • Tomcat Shutdown port: The port used by the management scripts that is used to shut the Tomcat server down when you need to stop the Service Manager. The default value is 18005.

    • Tomcat SSL Port: The standard port used to connect to the Service Manager when you want to use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encrypted communication. The default value is 18443.

  • Repository Configuration (MySQL Server)

    • Repository Username: The user name created and used to store information within the MySQL server to hold the information used by the Service Manager. In normal use, you should not need to use or modify this information, but it may be required if you have a support issue. The default value is service_manager.

    • Repository User password: The password to be used for the Repository Username. This should be set to a secure password so that the repository data is secure.

The information that you configure during installation will always be recorded within the configuration_report.txt file within the installation directory for the Service Manager.

Caution

Because the information stored within the configuration_report.txt file is in plain text, the Repository user name and password information are also exposed within this file. Make sure that the installation directory and file are secure that they can only be accessed by those users who would need to use the information.

15.3.2.2. Service Manager Installation on Windows

On Windows the installation modes are win32 and unattended only. unattended mode is especially useful if you are doing multiple installations. For more information on this topic see Section 15.3.4, “Unattended Installation”.

Note

To install the Service Manager as a Windows service, you must do the installation as a privileged user.

On Windows Vista or later, if user account control is on, an operating system dialog box requests confirmation of the installation.

To install the Service Manager on Windows, find the executable file named mysqlmonitor-version-windows-installer.exe (where version represents the three-part version number).

  1. Double-click the MySQL Monitor installer. You should be presented with the Language Selection prompt. Select the language to use for the installer and then click OK.

    Figure 15.2. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on Windows: Language Selection

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on Windows: Language Selection
  2. With the installation language selected, the remainder of the installation sets up the installation location and the main configuration parameters required by MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. Click Next to continue.

  3. Select the installation directory where you want the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager components installed. By default on Windows the directory is C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Monitor. You click the button next to the installation directory field to select a directory using the File chooser, or type the directory manually. Click Next to continue.

    Figure 15.3. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on Windows: Installation Directory

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on Windows: Installation Directory
  4. Configure the options that set the network ports used by the Tomcat server. For more information, see Section 15.3.2.1, “Service Manager Installation Common Parameters”. Click Next to continue.

    Figure 15.4. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on Windows: Tomcat Server Options

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on Windows: Tomcat Server Options
  5. Configure the repository settings, setting the user name, password and port used to communicate with the bundled MySQL server that will be used to store the information and statistics for your installation. For more information, see Section 15.3.2.1, “Service Manager Installation Common Parameters”. Click Next to continue.

    Note

    If the Windows firewall is enabled you will be asked to unblock ports for Apache/Tomcat and the MySQL server.

    Figure 15.5. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on Windows: Repository Configuration

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on Windows: Repository Configuration
  6. You will be provided with information and a warning about the configuration options and how they are stored in the configuration_report.txt file, and it's location. Take a note of the full path to this file in case you need to look up the information later. Click Next to continue.

  7. You should now be prompted to start the installation process. Click Next to continue.

  8. Once the installation has been completed, you will be provided with the information on how to uninstall MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. Click Next to continue.

  9. To complete the installation and set up your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, you will need to login to the Dashboard. You can do this automatically by checking the box on the final window before clicking Finish. This checkbox is selected by default. If you do not want to run the Dashboard at this time, uncheck the box and clock Finish.

For instructions on starting the MySQL Enterprise Monitor services under Windows, see Section 15.3.2.5, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Windows”.

15.3.2.3. Service Manager Installation on Mac OS X

On Mac OS X there are three installation modes osx, text, and unattended. For more information on this topic see Section 15.3.4, “Unattended Installation”. The text mode installation for Mac OS X is identical to text installation under Unix. For text mode installation instructions see Section 15.3.2.4, “Service Manager Installation on Unix”.

Installing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager on Mac OS X requires an existing installation of Java. The minimum required version is 1.5.0_7. If this version is not installed on your machine you can download it from Apple. This version of Java requires Mac OS X version 10.4.5 as a minimum, so you may need to upgrade your operating system in order to install it.

For reasons of backward compatibility, Mac OS X is usually installed with multiple versions of Java. When installing in osx mode, version 1.5.0_7 must be the default version. Upon installation, Java 1.5.0_7 sets itself as the default so this is usually not a problem.

If you have changed the default you can reset it or you may install the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager in text mode, setting the environment variables to point to the correct version of Java. To install in text mode, find the installbuilder file in the Contents/MacOS directory immediately below the mysqlmonitor-version-osx-installer.app directory. Installing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager in text mode is identical to the procedure described in Section 15.3.2.4, “Service Manager Installation on Unix” with the minor differences noted above.

To install using the GUI (osx) installation, follow these instructions:

  1. Double-click the MySQL Monitor installer. You should be presented with the Language Selection prompt. Select the language to use for the installer and then click OK.

    Figure 15.6. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on OS X: Language Selection

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on OS X: Language Selection
  2. If you have multiple Java installations on your machine, you will be asked to choose which Java to use with your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation. Choose the Java version you want to use (1.5.0 or later is required), and click OK.

    Figure 15.7. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on OS X: Java Selection

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on OS X: Java Selection
  3. With the installation language and Java version selected, the remainder of the installation sets up the installation location and the main configuration parameters required by MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. Click Next to contintue.

  4. Select the installation directory where you want the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager components installed. By default on Mac OS X the directory is /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor. You click the button next to the installation directory field to select a directory using the File chooser, or type the directory manually. Click Next to continue.

    Figure 15.8. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on OS X: Installation Directory

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on OS X: Installation Directory
  5. Configure the options that set the network ports used by the Tomcat server. For more information, see Section 15.3.2.1, “Service Manager Installation Common Parameters”. Click Next to continue.

    Figure 15.9. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on OS X: Tomcat Server Options

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on OS X: Tomcat Server Options
  6. Configure the repository settings, setting the user name, password and port used to communicate with the bundled MySQL server that will be used to store the information and statistics for your installation. For more information, see Section 15.3.2.1, “Service Manager Installation Common Parameters”. Click Next to continue.

    Figure 15.10. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Monitor on OS X: Repository Configuration

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Monitor on OS X: Repository Configuration
  7. You will be provided with information and a warning about the configuration options and how they are stored in the configuration_report.txt file, and it's location. Take a note of the full path to this file in case you need to look up the information later. Click Next to continue.

  8. You should now be prompted to start the installation process. Click Next to continue.

  9. Once the installation has been completed, you will be provided with the information on how to uninstall MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. Click Next to continue.

  10. To complete the installation and set up your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, you will need to login to the Dashboard. You can do this automatically by checking the box on the final window before clicking Finish. This checkbox is selected by default. If you do not want to run the Dashboard at this time, uncheck the box and clock Finish.

Your installation should now be complete. To continue with the configuration of MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, see Section 15.3.2.7, “MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Configuration Settings and Advisor Installation”.

15.3.2.4. Service Manager Installation on Unix

To install the Service Manager find the file named mysqlmonitor-version-installer.bin (where version indicates the version number, the OS, and the architecture ). Ensure that this file is executable by typing:

shell> chmod +x mysqlmonitor-version-installer.bin

To install to the default directory (/opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor) you need to be logged in as root. Installing as an unprivileged user installs to the /home/user_name/mysql/enterprise/monitor/ directory.

What follows describes installation from the command line. You may install the Service Manager graphically by running the installer from within a windows manager. In both cases the steps are identical. You may also install the Service Manager in unattended mode. This is especially useful if you are doing multiple installations. For more information on this topic see Section 15.3.4, “Unattended Installation”.

  1. Begin installation by typing:

      shell> ./mysqlmonitor-version-installer.bin
    
  2. First choose the language for the installation:

    Language Selection
    
    Please select the installation language
    [1] English
    [2] Japanese
    Please choose an option [1] :
    
  3. Throughout the installation process you will be asked the configuration questions for different options. Default values are shown between square brackets; to use the default press Enter. Otherwise, enter the new value and press Enter:

    First, select the directory where you want MySQL Enterprise Service Manager to be installed. The default is /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/. Make sure that the location you choose has enough space to hold the installation files and the database information that will be created when MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is running.

    Please specify the directory where the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager
     will be installed.
    
    Installation directory [/opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/]:
     
  4. Now set the Tomcat Server options. For more details on these parameters, see Section 15.3.2.1, “Service Manager Installation Common Parameters”.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tomcat Server Options
    
    Please specify the following parameters for the bundled Tomcat Server
    
    Tomcat Server Port [18080]:
    
    Tomcat Shutdown Port [18005]:
    
    Tomcat SSL Port [18443]:
    

    You will also be asked if SSL support is required. SSL support allows your agents and monitor to communicate with each other using SSL. Using SSL means that the data exchanged by the agent and MySQL Enterprise Service Manager are secure and can be used to monitor servers securely, or to monitor agents over a public connection.

    You can enable SSL by pressing Y when prompted during installation:

    Is SSL support required?           [y/N]: 
  5. Set the repository (embedded MySQL server) configuration options. For more details on these parameters, see Section 15.3.2.1, “Service Manager Installation Common Parameters”.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Repository Configuration
    
    Please specify the following parameters for the bundled MySQL server
    
    
    Repository Username  [service_manager]:
    
    Password :
    
    Re-enter :
    
    Bundled MySQL Database Port [13306]:
    
    
  6. Before the final installation process, you will provided with the location of the file that contains a copy of all of the settings. Be sure to follow the instructions and store this report in a secure location. There is no password recovery feature.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Configuration Report
    
    Note:
    
    The settings you specified will be saved here:
    
    /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/configuration_report.txt
    
    IMPORTANT: This configuration report includes passwords stored in plain text; it
    is intended to help you install and configure your agents. We strongly advise
    you to secure or delete this text file immediately after installation.
    			
    
    Press [Enter] to continue :
    
    
  7. You you will now be asked to confirm the installation process.

    Setup is now ready to begin installing MySQL Enterprise Monitor
     on your computer.
    
    Do you want to continue? [Y/n]: Y
    
    Please wait while Setup installs MySQL Enterprise Monitor
     on your computer.
    

    The installation process may take a few minutes to complete. Upon completion you should see:

    Completed installing files
    
    Setup has completed installing MySQL Enterprise files on your computer
    
    Uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise files can be done by invoking:
    
    /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/uninstall
    
    To complete the installation, launch the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard and complete
    the initial setup and product activation information. Refer to the readme file
    for additional information and a list of known issues.
    
    
    Press [Enter] to continue :
    
    
  8. Finally, you will be given the opportunity to read a supplied Readme file that is supplied with the installation. The Readme contains important information about how to use and start your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Setup has finished installing MySQL Enterprise Monitor on your computer.
    
    View Readme File [Y/n]: n
              

    Once the Readme file has been displayed, or if you did not elect to read the file, the installation provides information about how to continue with your installation.

    Info: To access the MySQL Enterprise Monitor please visit the
    following page: http://localhost:18080/Auth.action
    
    Press [Enter] to continue :
    

The Enterprise Dashboard will not start up automatically if you perform a text mode installation. For more information on starting and stopping MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, see Section 15.3.2.6, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Unix and Mac OS X”.

15.3.2.5. Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Windows

You can choose to start up the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager on installation. The installed services are called:

  • MySQL Enterprise Tomcat

  • MySQL Enterprise MySQL

You can stop or start the services from the Microsoft Management Console Services window. Look for the MySQL Enterprise Tomcat and the MySQL Enterprise MySQL entries.

Note

On Windows Vista or later, starting these services requires administrative privileges—you must be logged in as an administrator. To start or stop a service right-click it and choose the Run as Administrator menu option. The same restriction applies to using the menu options discussed in the following and to starting the services from the command line. To open an administrator cmd window right-click the cmd icon and choose the Run as Administrator menu option.

To start or stop a service, right-click it and choose from the options in the pop-up menu.

There is also a menu entry for starting and stopping the services. Navigate to the Program, MySQL, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, Services entry to stop or start the services.

You can also stop or start a service from the command line. To start the Tomcat service type:

shell> sc start MySQLEnterpriseTomcat

or:

shell> net start MySQLEnterpriseTomcat

To stop this service type:

shell> sc stop MySQLEnterpriseTomcat

or:

shell> net stop MySQLEnterpriseTomcat

In similar fashion, you may stop or start the MySQL server from the command line. The service name is MySQLEnterpriseMySQL.

You may also start, stop, and restart a specific service or both services using the mysqlmonitorctl.bat file. To execute this file, go to the command line and navigate to the C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Monitor directory. Typing mysqlmonitorctl.bat help produces the following output:

usage: mysqlmonitorctl.bat help
       mysqlmonitorctl.bat (start|stop|restart|install|uninstall)
       mysqlmonitorctl.bat (start|stop|restart) tomcat
       mysqlmonitorctl.bat (start|stop|restart) mysql

help       - this screen
start      - start the service(s)
stop       - stop the service(s)
restart    - restart or start the service(s)
install    - install the service(s)
uninstall  - uninstall the service(s)

To stop a specific service, pass the argument tomcat or mysql in addition to the status change argument. If you wish to change the status of both services, do not specify a service name. You may also uninstall the services using this batch file.

Configuration of the dashboard begins immediately after the Service Manager is installed. To continue a Windows installation skip the next section and go to Section 15.3.2.7, “MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Configuration Settings and Advisor Installation”.

15.3.2.6. Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Unix and Mac OS X

The services incorporated into the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager are:

  • The MySQL Server

  • The Apache/Tomcat Server

Should you need to stop, start, or restart the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager call the mysqlmonitorctl.sh file located in the /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/ directory on Unix or the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor/ on Mac OS X. To see all the available options navigate to the appropriate directory and type:

shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/mysqlmonitorctl.sh help

Executing this script produces the following output:

usage: ./mysqlmonitorctl.sh help
./mysqlmonitorctl.sh (start|stop|status|restart)
./mysqlmonitorctl.sh (start|stop|status|restart) mysql
./mysqlmonitorctl.sh (start|stop|status|restart) tomcat

help       - this screen
start      - start the service(s)
stop       - stop  the service(s)
restart    - restart or start the service(s)
status     - report the status of the service

Using this script you can stop, start, or restart all the Service Manager components. To do this make a call to mysqlmonitorctl.sh start from your start-up script.

To start the service:

shell> ./mysqlmonitorctl.sh start
./mysqlmonitorctl.sh : mysql  started
nohup: redirecting stderr to stdout
Starting mysqld daemon with databases from /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/mysql/data/
Using CATALINA_BASE:   /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/apache-tomcat
Using CATALINA_HOME:   /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/apache-tomcat
Using CATALINA_TMPDIR: /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/apache-tomcat/temp
Using JRE_HOME:       /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/java

If you try to start the service and it is already running, you will be warned that the services are already running:

shell> ./mysqlmonitorctl.sh start
./mysqlmonitorctl.sh : mysql  (pid 18403) already running
./mysqlmonitorctl.sh : tomcat  (pid 18480) already running

To stop the service:

shell> ./mysqlmonitorctl.sh stop
Using CATALINA_BASE:   /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor/apache-tomcat
Using CATALINA_HOME:   /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor/apache-tomcat
Using CATALINA_TMPDIR: /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor/apache-tomcat/temp
Using JRE_HOME:       /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/Versions/1.5.0/Home
Stopping tomcat service .. [ OK ]
STOPPING server from pid file /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor/mysql/data/mysqld.pid
090209 15:37:09  mysqld ended

The restart command is equivalent to executing a stop and then start operation.

This script can also be used to check the status of the Tomcat web server or the MySQL repository.

shell> ./mysqlmonitorctl.sh status
MySQL Network MySQL is running
MySQL Network Tomcat is running

Configuration of the dashboard begins immediately after the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is installed.

15.3.2.7. MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Configuration Settings and Advisor Installation

The Enterprise Dashboard is the web-based interface to the Service Manager so the procedure for starting the dashboard is identical for all platforms. From the dashboard you can configure the settings necessary for receiving updates from MySQL Enterprise and for the initial installation of the Advisors.

If you installed the Service Manager using a graphical interface, you have the option of launching the dashboard on the final installation screen (as long as the Launch MySQL Enterprise Monitor Now checkbox is checked).

Otherwise, you can view the dashboard by typing http://localhost:18080/Auth.action into the address bar of your web browser. If you are unsure of the host name and port to use, check the configuration_report.txt file.

Under Windows it is also possible to open the dashboard by choosing the MySQL menu item and finding the MySQL Enterprise Monitor entry. Under this entry choose Start Service Manager.

15.3.2.7.1. Initial Dashboard Log-In

If this is the first time that you have attempted to log in to the dashboard you should see a screen similar to the following:

Figure 15.11. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Initial Dashboard Log-In

MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Initial
            dashboard log-in

Use this screen to perform the following tasks:

  • Install the Advisors

  • Set up your MySQL Enterprise credentials

  • Create a user name and password for the dashboard administrator

  • Create a user name and password for the Monitor Agent

If you have been provided with a MySQL Enterprise Product Key and an Advisors file click the Browse button and locate these files. The advisor file bears the name, AdvisorScript-version.jar and the product key, Subscription-level_date.xml. If you do not allow Internet access from the dashboard you must install the advisors in this way. It is strongly recommended that you install the Advisors at this point, but you may do so later. For instructions on doing this see, Section 15.3.2.7.3, “Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in”. If the product key that you provide is invalid a notification appears and you will be unable to import the advisors.

Note

If you are activating the MySQL Enterprise Monitor using a product key donot enter your MySQL credentials; entering both produces an error message.

If you have Internet access from the dashboard, activate MySQL Enterprise Monitor by supplying your MySQL Enterprise credentials. Enter your email address as the MySQL Enterprise Login and enter and confirm your MySQL Enterprise password. If you specify incorrect credentials, you receive the error message, “Unable to connect to verify credentials.

In the Create Administrator section of this screen, enter credentials for the dashboard administrator. This creates the root user described in Section 15.3.1.3, “Users Created on First Log-in”. Make note of the user name and password as these credentials are required for any future login.

In the Configure Agent Credentials section of this screen enter the credentials for the agent. This is the agent user also described in Section 15.3.1.3, “Users Created on First Log-in”. The agent needs to log in to report its findings. Make note of the agent's credentials; this information is required when installing the agent.

When all the settings have been specified, click the complete setup button. If you log in successfully you should see a message displaying the number of graphs and advisors that have been imported. This number varies depending upon your subscription level.

If importation of the advisor files fails, you will see the message:

Unable to import Advisor Jar. You may download the jar
manually from the Enterprise Portal and import it from the 'Check For Updates' page.

In this case you may download the advisor file from the Enterprise website and install it as described in Section 15.3.2.7.3, “Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in”.

15.3.2.7.2. Setting the Timezone and Locale

If this is the first time that you have launched the dashboard you are asked to set your time zone and locale. Choose the appropriate values from the drop-down list boxes. Setting the time zone ensures that you have an accurate time reference for any notifications from the MySQL Enterprise Advisors.

Warning

It is especially important that the time zone be set correctly as this may also affect the way the graphs display. For this reason, also ensure that the time reported by the operating system is correct. To change the time zone or locale see Section 15.5.2, “User Preferences”.

The locale chosen determines the user's default language when logging in to the Dashboard. Note that this will override the default browser settings whenever this specific user logs in.

After specifying your time zone and locale, the dashboard opens on the Monitor page. For a detailed examination of the Monitor Screen see, Section 15.4, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard”.

15.3.2.7.3. Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in

The Advisors interpret the data sent by the Monitor Agents and display the results in the dashboard. A minimal set of Advisors are preinstalled with the Service Manager. To obtain the full set of Advisors and get the most value from the MySQL Enterprise Monitor, you must download Advisors from MySQL Enterprise.

If you did not install the Advisors when you first logged in to the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard, open the dashboard, find the Advisors tab, and choose the Check for Updates link. Doing this downloads the latest version of the Advisors from the MySQL Enterprise web site. In order to install the advisors in this fashion you must specify your MySQL Enterprise credentials. Find instructions for doing this in Section 15.5.1, “Global Settings”.

If you do not allow Internet access from the dashboard, you must install the Advisors from a local file. To do this you need an advisor file bearing the name, AdvisorScript-version.jar. If you don't already have this file, you can find it on the MySQL Enterprise downloads page. Download the Advisors file to a location that is accessible from the dashboard. Use the Browse button to find the Advisors file and then choose import to load the advisors.

15.3.2.7.4. Upgrading and Updating Advisors

The process for upgrading advisors is exactly the same as the initial installation. Advisors are updated by choosing the update button on the Check for Updates page. If you do not have Internet access from the dashboard you can import the Advisors from a local file as described in Section 15.3.2.7.3, “Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in”.

Note

You may choose to upgrade your MySQL Enterprise Monitor subscription level at any time.

15.3.2.7.5. Outgoing Email Settings

Alert notification through email is a key component of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Advisor solution. For this reason you may want to immediately configure an SMTP account for at least one recipient.

To do this choose the Settings tab and go to the Global Settings screen by clicking the appropriate link. Here you can configure the email settings. These settings apply to the currently logged-in user.

Find the Outgoing Email Settings on the left of this page.

Figure 15.12. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Outgoing Email Settings

MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Outgoing email
            settings

Ensure that the Enable Email Notifications checkbox is checked and enter information as appropriate.

The default value for the SMTP port is 25. If your mail server runs on a different port simply specify it, separating it from the server name using a colon. For example, if your mail server runs on port 587 enter email.myserver.com:587 into the SMTP Server text box.

Note

An email server must be available for sending email alerts.

The SMTP client uses Transport Layer Security (TLS) if the SMTP server supports it.

If your SMTP server incorrectly indicates that it supports TLS, check the Disable JavaMail TLS/SSL check box.

The email settings page is dealt with in more detail in Section 15.5, “The Settings Page”.

15.3.3. Monitor Agent Installation

A MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent monitors a MySQL server and sends data to the Advisors. These data are interpreted and displayed in the dashboard. The Monitor Agent is installed on all platforms using the steps described in the next section.

Warning

The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager version 2.0 or higher requires agents with a version number of 2.0 or higher.

15.3.3.1. Creating a MySQL User Account for the Monitor Agent

Before setting up an agent to monitor a MySQL server you need to ensure that there is a user account for the agent on that server.

The privileges required for this user account vary depending on the information you wish to gather using the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent. The following privileges allow the Monitor Agent to perform its assigned duties without limitation:

  • SHOW DATABASES: Allows the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to gather inventory about the monitored MySQL server.

  • REPLICATION CLIENT: Allows the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to gather Replication master/slave status data. This privilege is only needed if the MySQL Replication Advisor Rules are employed.

  • SELECT: Allows the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to collect statistics for table objects.

  • SUPER: Allows the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to execute SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS to collect data about InnoDB tables. This privilege is also required to obtain replication information using SHOW MASTER STATUS.

  • PROCESS: When monitoring a MySQL server running MySQL 5.1.24 or above with InnoDB, the PROCESS privilege is required to execute SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS.

  • INSERT: Required to create the UUID required by the agent.

  • CREATE: Allows the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to create tables. During discovery, the agent creates the table inventory within the mysql database that is used to the UUID for the server. Without this table, the agent cannot determine the UUID of the server and therefore use this when sending information to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

For example, the following GRANT statement will give the agent the required SELECT, REPLICATION CLIENT, SHOW DATABASES and SUPER rights:

GRANT SELECT, REPLICATION CLIENT, SHOW DATABASES, SUPER, PROCESS
  ON *.*
  TO  'mysqluser'@'localhost'
  IDENTIFIED BY 'agent_password';

For security reasons, you may wish to limit the CREATE and INSERT privileges to the agent so that it can only create tables within the mysql database:

GRANT CREATE, INSERT
  ON mysql.*
  TO  'mysqluser'@'localhost'
  IDENTIFIED BY 'agent_password';

To enable replication discovery to work, you should also grant the SELECT privilege on the mysql.inventory table for each user with replication privileges on the corresponding replication master. This is required to let the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent read the replication master UUID. For example:

GRANT SELECT
  ON mysql.inventory
  TO  'replicationuser'@'%'
  IDENTIFIED BY 'replication_password';
Note

You should perform this step after after having run the agent on the corresponding MySQL server to ensure that the mysql.inventory table has been correctly created. You can do this by running the agent, shutting the agent down, running the above GRANT statement, and then restarting the agent.

If the agent is unable to access the information from the table then a warning containing this information will be written to the agent log.

Note

You may want to disable logging for the grant statement to prevent the grant information being replicated to the slaves. If this is the case, execute the statement SET SQL_LOG_BIN=0 before you execute the above GRANT statement.

In a typical configuration, the agent runs on the same machine as the MySQL server it is monitoring so the host name will be localhost. However, this will change if the agent is running on a machine other than the one that hosts the monitored MySQL server. In this case, change localhost to the appropriate value. For more information about remote monitoring see Section 15.3.3.6.4, “Configuring an Agent to Monitor a Remote MySQL Server”.

15.3.3.2. Installing the Agent on Microsoft Windows

To install the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on Windows, double-click the mysqlmonitoragent-version-windows-installer.exe (where version indicates the three-part version number) installer.

Note

To install the agent as a Windows service, you must do the installation as a privileged user.

On Windows Vista or later, if user account control is on, an operating system dialog box requests confirmation of the installation.

You may also install the Monitor Agent in unattended mode. This is especially useful if you are doing multiple installations. For more information on this topic see, Section 15.3.4, “Unattended Installation”.

  1. First, select the language for the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent installation. Click OK to continue installation.

    Figure 15.13. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Windows: Language Selection

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Windows: Language Selection
  2. Click Next to start the installation process.

  3. Select the installation directory. The default installation directory is C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Agent. Select the installation directory, or type the new directory location. Click Next to continue the installation process.

    Figure 15.14. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Windows: Installation Directory

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Windows: Installation Directory
  4. You need to specify the information about the MySQL server that you want to monitor. You must enter the IP address or host name of the host you want to monitor, and the port, user name and password that you will use to connect to the MySQL server. If you want to confirm that the MySQL server is currently reachable using the information, ensure that the Validate MySQL host name or IP address checkbox is selected.

    Note

    Currently, on Windows, the monitor agent only includes support for connecting to the server to be monitored using TCP/IP, so if the server has been started with --skip-networking it cannot be monitored.

    If the MySQL server to be monitored has been started using the command option --bind-address then the server will only listen for connections on the IP address specified, that is, the IP address of the MySQL server. If the monitor agent has been started using TCP/IP networking and the default address of 127.0.0.1 it will not be able to connect to the server to be monitored. Also, if “localhost” is specified as the host name during agent configuration, a connection will not be established, as the server will be listening for connections on the address specified with the --bind-address option, not 127.0.0.1.

    Figure 15.15. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Windows: Monitored Database Information

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Windows: Monitored Database Information

    Click Next to continue the installation.

  5. If you want to use Query Analyzer, then you need to enable the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Proxy. The Proxy is enabled by default. If you disable the Proxy during installation, you will need to enable it later before you are able to use Query Analyzer. For more information on Query Analyzer, see Section 15.10, “The Query Analyzer Page”.

    When Proxy is enabled, MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent listens on a network port for client applications, and forwards the connections to the backend MySQL server. You can change the port number that MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent listens for connections.

    The default port is 6446.

    Figure 15.16. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Windows: Query Analyzer Configuration

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Windows: Query Analyzer Configuration
  6. The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager that you want to use must be configured during installation. The host name, port and agent authentication information must be entered. If you have already installed MySQL Enterprise Service Manager then you can locate the information in the installation report file created during installation. Enter the required information and then click Next to continue.

    Figure 15.17. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Windows: MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Options

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Windows: MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Options
  7. You will be provided with a Configuration Report containing the information that you have entered during the installation. Check the information provided in the report. If you see a problem, use Back to go back to the configuration screen and change the information. If the information is correct, click Next to continue.

  8. You are given a final opportunity to change the installation parameters. Click Next to start the installation process.

  9. Once the agent has been installed, you will get a confirmation message. Click Next to finalize the installation.

  10. You can start the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent automatically now the installation has been completed. To allow the agent to be started, leave the checkbox selected. To start the agent separately, uncheck the checkbox. Click Finish to exit the installation.

Once the Monitor Agent is installed, it needs to be started. For information on how to start and stop the Agent, see Section 15.3.3.5.1, “Starting/Stopping the Agent on Windows”.

15.3.3.3. Installing the Agent on Mac OS X

To install the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on Mac OS X, decompress the mysqlmonitoragent-version-installer.app.zip and then run the mysqlenterpriseagent-version-installer application.

  1. First, select the language for the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent installation. Click OK to continue installation.

    Figure 15.18. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Mac OS X: Language Selection

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Mac OS X: Language Selection
  2. Click Next to start the installation process.

  3. Select the installation directory. The default installation directory is /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent. Select the installation directory, or type the new directory location.

    You also need to select the method that the agent will use to communicate with the MySQL server. You can choose either to use a TCP/IP (network) connection, or a Socket (local) connection. Choose the connection method, and click Next.

    Note

    The monitor agent always associates “localhost” with the TCP/IP address 127.0.0.1, not the MySQL socket. This is in contrast to the MySQL Command Line Tool, which connects using the MySQL socket by default on Unix, if the hostname “localhost” is specified.

    If the MySQL server you wish to monitor has been started with the --skip-networking command option then you will not be able to connect to it using TCP/IP, as the server will not listen for TCP/IP connections. In this case the monitor agent will need to be configured to use the MySQL socket. This can be done during installation by selecting “socket” rather than “TCP/IP” and then specifying the MySQL socket name. This can also be configured after installation by editing the agent-instance.ini configuration file, for further information on this refer to Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”.

    If the MySQL server to be monitored has been started using the command option --bind-address then the server will only listen for connections on the IP address specified, that is, the IP address of the MySQL server. If the monitor agent has been started using TCP/IP networking and the default address of 127.0.0.1 it will not be able to connect to the server to be monitored. Also, if “localhost” is specified as the host name during agent configuration, a connection will not be established, as the server will be listening for connections on the address specified with the --bind-address option, not 127.0.0.1.

    Figure 15.19. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Mac OS X: Installation Directory

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Mac OS X: Installation Directory
  4. You need to specify the information about the MySQL server that you want to monitor. The configuration information you enter will depend on the connection method selected in the previous screen.

    • If you chose TCP/IP as the connection method, you must enter the IP address or host name of the host you want to monitor, and the port, user name and password that you will use to connect to the MySQL server. If you want to confirm that the MySQL server is currently reachable using the information, ensure that the Validate MySQL host name or IP address checkbox is selected.

      Figure 15.20. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Mac OS X: Monitored Database Information

      MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
                  Agent on Mac OS X: Monitored Database
                  Information
    • If you chose Socket as the connection method, you must enter the full path name to the Unix socket created by your MySQL server, and the user name and password that will be used to authenticate with the server. Typical values include /tmp/mysql.sock and /var/mysql/mysql.sock.

      Figure 15.21. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Mac OS X: Monitored Database Information

      MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
                  Agent on Mac OS X: Monitored Database
                  Information

    Click Next to continue the installation.

  5. If you want to use Query Analyzer, then you need to enable the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Proxy. The Proxy is enabled by default. If you disable the Proxy during installation, you will need to enable it later before you are able to use Query Analyzer. For more information on Query Analyzer, see Section 15.10, “The Query Analyzer Page”.

    When Proxy is enabled, MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent listens on a network port for client applications, and forwards the connections to the backend MySQL server. You can change the port number that MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent listens for connections The default port is 6446.

    Figure 15.22. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Mac OS X: Query Analyzer Configuration

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Mac OS X: Query Analyzer Configuration
  6. The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager that you want to use must be configured during installation. The host name, port and agent authentication information must be entered. If you have already installed MySQL Enterprise Service Manager then you can locate the information in the installation report file created during installation. Enter the required information and then click Next to continue.

    Figure 15.23. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing Agent on Mac OS X: MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Options

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Installing
              Agent on Mac OS X: MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Options
  7. You will be provided with a Configuration Report containing the information that you have entered during the installation. Check the information provided in the report. If you see a problem, use Back to go back to the configuration screen and change the information. If the information is correct, click Next to continue.

  8. You are given a final opportunity to change the installation parameters. Click Next to start the installation process.

  9. Once the agent has been installed, you will get a confirmation message. Click Next to finalize the installation.

  10. You can start the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent automatically now the installation has been completed. To allow the agent to be started, leave the checkbox selected. To start the agent separately, uncheck the checkbox. Click Finish to exit the installation.

Once the Monitor Agent is installed, it needs to be started. For information on how to start and stop the Agent, see Section 15.3.3.5.2, “Starting/Stopping the Agent on Mac OS X”.

15.3.3.4. Installing the Monitor Agent on Unix

As a prerequisite for installing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on Linux systems you must have the Linux Standards Base (LSB) initialization functions installed.

Note

You can check the existence of the LSB components by looking for an LSB package within your Linux package management environment. For example, on RedHat and other RPM-based distributions:

shell> rpm -qa | grep -i lsb
redhat-lsb-3.1-19.fc8.x86_64

Under Debian/Ubuntu:

shell> dpkg -l|grep -i lsb
ii  lsb-base                                   3.2-20ubuntu4                     
    Linux Standard Base 3.2 init script function
ii  lsb-release                                3.2-20ubuntu4
    Linux Standard Base version reporting utilit

Alternatively, you can use the lsb_release command. Existence of this command normally indicates that the current distribution is LSB compliant.

To install the agent navigate to the directory that contains the file, mysqlmonitoragent-version-installer.bin (where version indicates the three-part version number, the OS, and the architecture). Ensure that this file is executable by typing:

shell> chmod +x mysqlmonitoragent-version-installer.bin

To install to the default directory (/opt/mysql/enterprise/agent) you need to be logged in as root. Installing as an unprivileged user installs to the /home/user_name/mysql/enterprise/agent directory.

Note

If you install the agent as an unprivileged user, it will not automatically start up on rebooting.

What follows describes installation from the command line. You may install the Monitor Agent graphically by running the installer from within a windows manager. In both cases the steps are identical. You may also install the Monitor Agent in unattended mode. This is especially useful if you are doing multiple installations. For more information on this topic see Section 15.3.4, “Unattended Installation”.

Begin installation from the command line by typing:

shell> ./mysqlmonitoragent-version-installer.bin --mode text

The various options are shown in what follows. Default values are indicated by square brackets; to select them press Enter. Otherwise enter a value of your choosing.

  1. First, you must select the Language you want to use during the installation process:

    Language Selection
    
    Please select the installation language
    [1] English
    [2] Japanese
    Please choose an option [1] :
    
  2. Next, specify the directory where you want the agent installed:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Welcome to the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Setup Wizard.
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Please specify the directory where MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent will be installed
    
    Installation directory [/opt/mysql/enterprise/agent]:
    
  3. Specify the MySQL server that you want to monitor. First, you must specify whether you want to use a TCP/IP or socket-based connection to communicate with the MySQL Server:

    How will the agent connect to the database it is monitoring?
    
    
    [1] TCP/IP
    [2] Socket
    Please choose an option [1] :

    If you select TCP/IP, then you will be asked to enter the TCP/IP address and port number:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Monitored Database Information
    
    IMPORTANT: The agent user account specified below requires special MySQL privileges.
    
    Visit the following URL for more information:
    https://enterprise.mysql.com/docs/monitor/2.0/en/mem-install.html#mem-agent-rights
    
    MySQL hostname or IP address [127.0.0.1]:
    
    
    
    Validate MySQL hostname or IP address [Y/n]:
    
    
    MySQL Port [3306]:
    
    

    If you select Socket, then you will be asked to provide the path name to the MySQL socket. Typical values are /tmp/mysql.sock, /var/lib/mysql.sock, or /var/run/mysql.sock.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Monitored Database Information
    
    IMPORTANT: The agent user account specified below requires special MySQL privileges.
    
    Visit the following URL for more information:
    https://enterprise.mysql.com/docs/monitor/2.0/en/mem-install.html#mem-agent-rights
    
    MySQL Socket []:
    
    Note

    The monitor agent always associates “localhost” with the TCP/IP address 127.0.0.1, not the MySQL socket. This is in contrast to the MySQL Command Line Tool, which connects using the MySQL socket by default on Unix, if the hostname “localhost” is specified.

    If the MySQL server you wish to monitor has been started with the --skip-networking command option then you will not be able to connect to it using TCP/IP, as the server will not listen for TCP/IP connections. In this case the monitor agent will need to be configured to use the MySQL socket. This can be done during installation by selecting “socket” rather than “TCP/IP” and then specifying the MySQL socket name. This can also be configured after installation by editing the agent-instance.ini configuration file, for further information on this refer to Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”.

    If the MySQL server to be monitored has been started using the command option --bind-address then the server will only listen for connections on the IP address specified, that is, the IP address of the MySQL server. If the monitor agent has been started using TCP/IP networking and the default address of 127.0.0.1 it will not be able to connect to the server to be monitored. Also, if “localhost” is specified as the host name during agent configuration, a connection will not be established, as the server will be listening for connections on the address specified with the --bind-address option, not 127.0.0.1.

  4. Specify the user credentials for the MySQL server that you want to monitor:

    MySQL Username []: service_agent
    
    MySQL Password :
    
    Re-enter :
    
  5. Select whether you want to enable Query Analyzer. If you disable the Query Analyzer during installation, you will need to manually edit the configuration file to re-enable the Query Analyzer functionality. If you enable Query Analyzer (Proxy), you must specify the port on which the agent will listen for queries.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Query Analyzer Configuration
    
    MySQL Proxy enables query monitoring and analysis by listening on a specified port for client connections that are then passed through to a backend MySQL database server. It is not needed for basic monitoring functionality.
    
    Click here for more information.
     [Y/n]:
    
    Enable Proxy (recommended) [Y/n]:
    
    
    Proxy Port [6446]:
    
    Backend Host: 127.0.0.1   (cannot be changed)
    
    Backend Port: 3306   (cannot be changed)
    

    For more information on enabling Query Analyzer if you disabled it during installation, see Section 15.10, “The Query Analyzer Page”.

  6. Enter the details of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager that you want to use with this agent. The configuration information required is available within the installation report generated when you installed MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    MySQL Enterprise Monitor Options
    
    
    Hostname or IP address []: 192.168.0.197
    
    Tomcat Server Port [18080]:
    
    Tomcat SSL Port [18443]:
    

    The agent and MySQL Enterprise Service Manager support using SSL for communication. If you want to enable SSL communication between the agent and the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, you must reply Y to the following question.

    Use SSL? [y/N]:
    
    Agent Username [agent]:
    
    Agent Password :
    
    Re-enter :
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
        
  7. Before installation starts, you will be provided with a summary of the installation settings that you have specified:

    Here are the settings you specified:
    
    Installation directory: /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent
    
    Monitored MySQL Database:
    -------------------------
    Hostname or IP address: 127.0.0.1
    Port: 3306
    MySQL username: mysql_user
    MySQL password: password
    
    Query Analyzer Configuration
    -------------------------
    Proxy Enabled: yes
    Proxy Port: 6446
    
    MySQL Enterprise Manager:
    ------------------------------
    
    Hostname or IP address: 192.168.0.197
    
    Tomcat Server Port: 18080
    Tomcat SSL Port: 18443
    Use SSL: 0
    Agent username: agent
    
    Press [Enter] to continue :
    
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Setup is now ready to begin installing MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on your computer.
    
    Do you want to continue? [Y/n]: y
        
  8. The installer will copy the necessary files and create the configuration file required to run the agent:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Please wait while Setup installs MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on your computer.
    
     Installing
     0% ______________ 50% ______________ 100%
     #########################################
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Info to start MySQL Agent
    
    The MySQL agent was successfully installed. To start the MySQL Agent please
    invoke:
    /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d/mysql-monitor-agent start
    Press [Enter] to continue :
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Setup has finished installing MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on your computer.
    
  9. Finally, you can read the supplied README file when prompted. The file is provided within the share/doc/README_en.txt file within the agent installation directory if you would like to read this file separately.

For information on starting the agent, see Section 15.3.3.5.3, “Starting/Stopping the Agent on Unix”.

15.3.3.5. Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent can be started and stopped at any time. When not running, information about the current status of your server will not be available, and MySQL Enterprise Service Manager will provide a warning if an agent and the MySQL server that it monitors is unavailable.

Warning

If you are using Query Analyzer, then turning off the agent will prevent your applications from communicating with the MySQL server. See Section 15.10, “The Query Analyzer Page”.

15.3.3.5.1. Starting/Stopping the Agent on Windows

You have the option of starting the Monitor Agent from the final installation screen. Otherwise you can do this by going to the Start Menu and under Programs find MySQL and then the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent entry. Simply select the Start MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent option.

Note

On Windows Vista or later, starting the agent requires administrative privileges—you must be logged in as an administrator. To start or stop the agent right-click the menu item and choose the Run as Administrator menu option. The same restriction applies to starting the agent from the command line. To open an administrator cmd window right-click the cmd icon and choose the Run as Administrator menu option.

Warning

To report its findings, the agent needs to be able to connect to the dashboard through the port specified during installation. The default value for this port is 18080; ensure that this port is not blocked. If you need help troubleshooting the agent installation see, Section 15.3.3.7, “Troubleshooting the Agent”.

Alternately, you can start the agent from the command line by entering:

shell> sc start MySQLEnterpriseMonitorAgent

or:

shell> net start MySQLEnterpriseMonitorAgent

You can also start the agent by issuing the command, agentctl.bat start. Stop the agent by passing the argument, stop. This batch file is found in the Agent directory.

For confirmation that the service is running you can open the Microsoft Management Console Services window. To do this go to the Control Panel, find Administrative Tools and click the link to Services. Locate the service named MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent and look under the Status column.

You may also start the agent from this window rather than from the Start menu or the command line. Simply right-click MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent and choose Start from the pop-up menu. Starting the agent from this window opens an error dialog box if the agent cannot connect to the MySQL server it is monitoring. No error is displayed if the agent is unable to connect to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

The pop-up menu for starting the agent also offers the option of stopping the agent. To stop the agent from the command line you only need type:

shell> sc stop MySQLEnterpriseMonitorAgent

or:

shell> net stop MySQLEnterpriseMonitorAgent
Note

MySQLEnterpriseMonitorAgent is the default name of the Monitor Agent service. If you have added an additional agent as described in Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”, replace MySQLEnterpriseMonitorAgent with the appropriate agent name.

15.3.3.5.2. Starting/Stopping the Agent on Mac OS X

The script to start the agent on Mac OS X is located in the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d directory. To start the agent navigate to this directory and at the command line type:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent start

To stop the agent, use the stop command:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent stop

If the agent cannot be stopped because the pid file that contains the agent's process ID cannot be found, you can use kill to send a TERM signal to the running process:

shell> kill -TERM PID

If you are running more than one agent on a specific machine, you must also specify the path to the ini file when you are stopping the agent. Executing mysql-monitor-agent stop without an ini file will only stop the agent associated with the default ini file.

To verify that the agent is running use the following command:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent status

The resulting message indicates whether the agent is running or not. If the agent is not running, use the following command to view the last ten entries in the agent log file:

shell> tail /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/log/mysql-monitor-agent.log

For further information on troubleshooting the agent see Section 15.3.3.7, “Troubleshooting the Agent”.

Installation creates the directory /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent with the settings stored in the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file located directly below this directory in the etc directory. The log directory is also located immediately below the agent directory.

To see all the command-line options available when running the monitor agent, navigate to the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d directory and execute mysql-monitor-agent help. You should see the message:

Usage: ./mysql-monitor-agent {start|stop|restart|status} [ini-file-name]

The ini-file-name option only needs to be used if the ini file is not installed to the default location or you have changed the name of the ini file. You will need to use this option if you are installing more than one agent on the same machine. Pass the full path to the ini file. For example, after navigating to the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d directory, issue the command:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent start /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/new-mysql-monitor-agent.ini

If you installed the agent as root, on reboot the mysql-monitor-agent daemon will start up automatically. If you installed the agent as an unprivileged user, you must manually start the agent on reboot or write a script to perform this task. Likewise, if you have added an additional agent as described in Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”, and you wish to start this agent on reboot, create a system initialization script appropriate to your operating system. To determine whether the agent is running or not navigate to the init.d directory and issue the command ./mysql-monitor-agent status.

Warning

To report its findings, the agent needs to be able to connect to the dashboard through the port specified during installation. The default value for this port is 18080; ensure that this port is not blocked. If you need help troubleshooting the agent installation see, Section 15.3.3.7, “Troubleshooting the Agent”.

15.3.3.5.3. Starting/Stopping the Agent on Unix

When installation is finished, you can start the monitor agent from the command line by typing:

shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d/mysql-monitor-agent start

For a non-root installation the command would be:

shell> /home/<user name>/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d/mysql-monitor-agent start

To stop the agent, use the stop command:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent stop

If the agent cannot be stopped because the pid file that contains the agent's process ID cannot be found, you can use kill to send a TERM signal to the running process:

shell> kill -TERM PID

If you are running more than one agent on a specific machine, you must also specify the path to the ini file when you are stopping the agent. Executing mysql-monitor-agent stop without an ini file will only stop the agent associated with the default ini file. Likewise, when checking the status of an agent specify its ini file.

To verify that the agent is running use the following command:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent status

The resulting message indicates whether the agent is running or not. If the agent is not running, use the following command to view the last ten entries in the agent log file:

shell> tail /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/log/mysql-monitor-agent.log

For further information on troubleshooting the agent see Section 15.3.3.7, “Troubleshooting the Agent”.

Installation creates the directory /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent with the settings stored in the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file located directly below this directory in the etc directory. The log directory is also located immediately below the agent directory.

To see all the command-line options available when running the monitor agent, navigate to the /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d directory and execute mysql-monitor-agent help. You should see the message:

Usage: ./mysql-monitor-agent {start|stop|restart|status} [ini-file-name]

The ini-file-name option only needs to be used if the ini file is not installed to the default location or you have changed the name of the ini file. You will need to use this option if you are installing more than one agent on the same machine. Pass the full path to the ini file. For example, after navigating to the /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d directory, issue the command:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent start /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/new-mysql-monitor-agent.ini

If you installed the agent as root, on reboot the mysql-monitor-agent daemon will start up automatically. If you installed the agent as an unprivileged user, you must manually start the agent on reboot or write a script to perform this task. Likewise, if you have added an additional agent as described in Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”, and you wish to start this agent on reboot, create a system initialization script appropriate to your operating system. To determine whether the agent is running or not navigate to the init.d directory and issue the command ./mysql-monitor-agent status.

Warning

To report its findings, the agent needs to be able to connect to the dashboard through the port specified during installation. The default value for this port is 18080; ensure that this port is not blocked. If you need help troubleshooting the agent installation see, Section 15.3.3.7, “Troubleshooting the Agent”.

15.3.3.6. Advanced Agent Configuration

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent is configured through files located within the etc directory within the directory where you installed the agent.

Configuration is stored in multiple files, according to a predetermined file and directory layout. The primary configuration file contains specific information about the agent and how the agent communicates with MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. The main configuration is located within the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file.

Additional configuration files contain information about the MySQL server that is being monitored. You can configure which directory is used for storing this information within the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file. The default location is the etc/instances directory within the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent directory.

The server you want to monitor should have a directory within the specified location, optionally using the name of the server you are monitoring, and within that directory, an agent-instance.ini file. This file contains the configuration information for connecting to the MySQL server, including the host name, port, user credentials and display name.

You can see an example of the file layout of the etc directory:

.
./init.d
./init.d/mysql-monitor-agent
./instances
./instances/agent
./instances/agent/agent-instance.ini
./mysql-monitor-agent.ini

For more information on the configuration of the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file, see Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”. For details on the content of the individual MySQL instance configuration files, see Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”.

15.3.3.6.1. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration

The mysql-monitor-agent.ini files contains the base configuration information for the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent. The file sets the core information about the supported functionality for the entire agent.

You can see a sample of the configuration file below:

# WARNING - the UUID defined below must be unique for each agent.
#
# To use this .ini file as a template for configuring additional
# agents, do not simply copy and start a new agent without first
# modifying the UUID.
#
# Refer to the documentation for more detailed information and
# instructions.
#
# Version: 20080718_230416_r7011

[mysql-proxy]

plugins=proxy,agent
agent-mgmt-hostname = http://agent:[email protected]:18080/heartbeat
mysqld-instance-dir= etc/instances
agent-item-files = share/mysql-proxy/items/quan.lua,share/mysql-proxy/items/items-mysql-monitor.xml
proxy-address=:6446
proxy-backend-addresses = 127.0.0.1:3306
proxy-lua-script        = share/mysql-proxy/quan.lua


agent-uuid = 8770ead5-3632-4b29-a413-4a7c92437e26
log-file = mysql-monitor-agent.log
pid-file=/Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/mysql-monitor-agent.pid
Note

Do not copy the agent configuration information from one machine to another without changing the agent-uuid. Each agent instance must have a unique agent id.

The main configuration information must be located within the [mysql-proxy] section of the configuration file. The main configurable parameters within this file are:

  • plugins: Configures the plugins to be used by the agent. When monitoring servers you must have the agent plugin configured. If you want to support Query Analyzer then you must also have the proxy module enabled. Plugins should be specified as a comma separated list of plugin names.

    If you selected to support Query Analyzer during installation of the agent, the default value will be proxy,agent. If you disabled Query Analysis during installation, the default value will be agent.

  • log-level: Sets the logging level of the agent. The default level is critical.

    Valid values for log-level are as follows:

    • debug: Provides detailed information about what the agent is doing and the information being provided by the agent to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

    • critical: Lists critical messages highlighting problems with the agent.

    • error: Lists error messages.

    • warning: Provides only warning messages generated by the agent.

    • message: Provides information about the agent and basic processing information.

    • info: Provides messages used for informational purposes.

    Warning

    Be careful when setting the log-level to debug. Doing this will rapidly increase the size of your mysql-monitor-agent.log file. To avoid disk space problems, put the log files on a different drive from your MySQL server and the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard.

    It is strongly recommended that you use a log-level of critical or error in a production server. Use the higher-levels to provide more detailed information only for debugging problems with your agent.

    Under Windows, if you restart the agent from the command line after setting the log-level to debug, extensive debug information is displayed to the console as well as to the log file.

  • agent-mgmt-hostname: Sets the URL to use when reporting information. This value will be automatically set to your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager during installation.

  • mysqld-instance-dir: Sets the directory where the configuration files that specify the MySQL servers to be monitored can be located.

  • agent-item-files: Sets the information that is provided up to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager when the agent is reporting status information. You should leave this item with the default setting of the share/mysql-proxy/items/quan.lua (which provides Query Analyzer data) and share/mysql-proxy/items/items-mysql-monitor.xml (which provides the core agent monitoring data).

  • proxy-address: Sets the address, port number, or both for the proxy to listen to for connections. The setting is used when employing Query Analysis as the address/port that you must configure your application to use in place of your normal MySQL server. By default this item is set during installation.

    The default value is 6446. If you want to support a different local host name/IP address and port, specify the host name and the port number, separated by a colon.

  • proxy-backend-addresses: Sets the host name and port number to be used when communicating the backend MySQL server when employing query analyzer. This is the MySQL server where packets from the client are sent when communicating with the proxy on the host name/port set by the proxy-address.

  • proxy-lua-script: Sets the Lua script to be used by the proxy when forwarding queries. To use Query Analyzer, this parameter should be set to share/mysql-proxy/quan.lua. This is the default value.

  • agent-uuid: Sets the UUID (Universally Unique ID) of the agent. This value should be unique for all agents communicating with the same server, as the UUID is used to uniquely ID the agent within MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

    If you are setting up multiple hosts and copying the configuration between hosts, make sure that the agent-uuid is unique. You can have the agent create a new UUID by leavig this configuration property blank.

  • log-file: Sets the location of the log file used to record information about the agent when it is running. If you do not specify a full path name, then the log file location is considered to be relative to the installation directory of the agent.

  • pid-file: Sets the location of the file used to record the Process ID of the agent. This is used by the script that shuts down the agent to identify the process to be shutdown. The default value is the mysql-monitor-agent.pid file within the base installation directory as created by the agent installer.

15.3.3.6.2. MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration

For the MySQL server that you want to monitor, you must create an agent-instance.ini within the directory specified by the mysqld-instance-dir configuration parameter within the main mysql-monitor-agent.ini file.

The agent-instance.ini file contains the host name and user credentials for connecting to the MySQL server that you want the agent to monitor. The format of the file is as follows:

# To use this .ini file as a template for configuring additional
# instances to monitor, do not simply copy and start a new agent
# without first modifying the displayname.
#
# Refer to the documentation for more detailed information and
# instructions.
#
# Version: 20080718_230416_r7011

[mysqld]
hostname = 127.0.0.1
port     = 3306
user     = root
password =

The individual configuration parameters can be defined as follows:

  • hostname: The host name of the MySQL server that you want to monitor.

  • port: The TCP/IP port of the MySQL server that you want to monitor.

  • user: The user to use when connecting to the MySQL server that you want to monitor.

  • password: The corresponding password to use when connecting to the MySQL server that you want to monitor.

It is also possible to configure the agent to use sockets. This can be done during installation by selecting “socket” rather than “TCP/IP” from the menu and then specifying the socket name. This can also be configured after installation by editing the agent-instance.ini configuration file, and adding the line:

socket = /full/path/to/mysql.sock
15.3.3.6.3. Monitoring Multiple MySQL Servers

You can monitor multiple MySQL servers (either on the same machine, or across different machines) using two different methods:

  • By using a single agent instance to monitor multiple MySQL servers. You can use this method if you want to monitor multiple servers, but do not want or need to support Query Analysis on the additional servers.

  • By using multiple copies of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to monitor each server individually. Using this method requires additional overhead to monitor each server, while also allowing you to supply Query Analyzer data.

Using a Single Agent Instance

Warning

Do not use the single agent instance method if you want to use Query Analyzer. If you set your application to use the proxy port provided by the single instance then the queries may not be directed to the correct server. Using Query Analyzer, the proxy, and the single agent instance method is not supported.

Warning

When using the single agent instance method, the agent will attempt to determine the right information about the backend server that it is monitoring to use the information when applying rule and advisor information. Currently, this operation is performed for only one of the servers in the list of configured servers. If the servers being monitoring are using different MySQL versions then the rules applied to the servers may be incorrect, and you could get wrong or misleading advice about issues or problems on a given server.

To use a single agent to monitor multiple instances, you can create additional directories and configuration files within the instances directory for the agent. For example, you can see the default structure of the agent configuration directory:

./init.d
./init.d/mysql-monitor-agent
./instances
./instances/agent
./instances/agent/agent-instance.ini
./mysql-monitor-agent.ini

Within the instances directory, you can add further directories, one for each monitored server. Each additional directory must have a suitable agent-instance.ini file containing the connection information for the new MySQL server instance. For example, the following structure demonstrates an agent monitoring four MySQL servers:

./init.d
./init.d/mysql-monitor-agent
./instances
./instances/agent
./instances/agent/agent-instance.ini
./instances/mysql2
./instances/mysql2/agent-instance.ini
./instances/mysql-rep
./instances/mysql-rep/agent-instance.ini
./instances/mysql-backup
./instances/mysql-backup/agent-instance.ini
./mysql-monitor-agent.ini

To add another MySQL monitored server, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure that the MySQL instance that you want to monitor has a suitable user to use for connecting to the server. For more information, see Section 15.3.3.1, “Creating a MySQL User Account for the Monitor Agent”.

  2. Copy an existing configuration directory and configuration files to the new directory:

    shell> cp -R etc/instances/agent etc/instances/mysql2
  3. Edit the configuration file within the new directory, for example mysql2/agent-instance.ini, and set the user, password and either the hostname and port, or socket parameters.

  4. Restart the agent:

    shell> mysql-monitor-agent restart

Using Multiple Agent Instances

To use multiple agents to monitor multiple MySQL servers you need to create a new configuration structure for both the agent and the MySQL server instances you need to monitor, including the binaries and configuration files, and then update the configuration to set the corresponding parameters to monitor the new server. Using this method allows you to enable query analyis by redirecting requests to the target server using the built-in proxy service within the agent.

For example, the directory structure below shows the configuration directory for two agents monitoring a single MySQL server each:

./init.d
./init.d/mysql-monitor-agent
./instances
./instances/agent
./instances/agent/agent-instance.ini
./instances-second/agent
./instances-second/agent/agent-instance.ini
./mysql-monitor-agent.ini
./mysql-second-agent.ini

The mysql-monitor-agent.ini file contains the configuration for the first agent, with the MySQL servers monitored defined within the instances directory. The mysql-second-agent.ini file contains the configuration information for the second agent, with the MySQL servers monitor defined within the instances-second directory.

To set up multiple agents:

  1. Make sure that the MySQL instance that you want to monitor has a suitable user to use for connecting to the server. For more information, see Section 15.3.3.1, “Creating a MySQL User Account for the Monitor Agent”.

  2. You need to generate a new UUID for the new agent:

    shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/bin/mysql-monitor-agent --agent-generate-uuid
    ee9296d7-f7cd-4fee-8b26-ead884ebf398
    2009-03-05 11:49:37: (critical) shutting down normally
    

    Keep a record of the UUID to update the configuration file.

    Note, the agent should not be running when the UUID is generated.

  3. Copy the main agent configuration file, which is by default in /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/mysql-monitor-agent.ini:

    shell> cp mysql-monitor-agent.ini mysql-second-agent.ini
  4. Edit the new configuration file, changing the following settings:

    • Change the mysqld-instance-dir to the new directory that will contain the individual MySQL server configuration files.

    • Change the proxy-address to a different value than the first agent configuration.

    • Change the proxy-backend-addresses to specify the IP address and MySQL port number for the MySQL server.

    • Change the agent-uuid to the new value obtained in an earlier step.

    • Change the log-file parameter to specify a different file to use when logging errors and problems. You cannot log to the same file from two different agents.

    • Change the pid-file parameter to specify the file that will be used to store the process ID of the agent.

  5. Copy an existing configuration directory and configuration files to the new directory:

    shell> cp -R etc/instances etc/instances-second
  6. Edit the configuration file, instances/second/agent/agent-instance.ini within the new directory, and set the user, password and either the hostname and port, or socket parameters.

  7. With multiple instances, you must start each agent individually, specifying the location of the main configuration file. For example, to start the original (default) service:

    shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d/mysql-monitor-agent start /opt/mysql/monitor/agent/etc/mysql-monitor-agent.ini

    To start the second instance:

    shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/etc/init.d/mysql-monitor-agent start /opt/mysql/monitor/agent/etc/mysql-second-agent.ini
15.3.3.6.4. Configuring an Agent to Monitor a Remote MySQL Server

Typically, the agent runs on the same machine as the MySQL server it is monitoring. Fortunately, this is not a requirement. If you want to monitor a MySQL server running on an operating system for which there is no agent available, you can install the agent on a machine other than the one hosting the MySQL server.

The process for installing an agent to monitor a MySQL server on a remote machine is identical to the process described in Section 15.3.3, “Monitor Agent Installation”. Follow the directions given there, being careful to specify the correct IP address or host name for the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and likewise for the MySQL server—since the agent is not running on the same machine as the MySQL server, it cannot be the default, localhost.

Don't forget that the agent must be given rights to log in to the MySQL server from a host other than localhost and that the port used by the MySQL server, typically 3306 must be open for remote access. For more information about the database credentials required by agents see, Section 15.3.3.1, “Creating a MySQL User Account for the Monitor Agent”.

The agent also needs to be able to log in to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, typically using port 18080, so ensure that the appropriate port is open.

Note

Remote agents do not report the OS information for either the host or the agent.

If your subscription level entitles you to replication autodiscovery, do not use remote monitoring with replication slaves or masters. The agent must be installed on the same machine as the server you are monitoring for discovery to work properly. For more information, see Section 15.11, “The Replication Page”.

15.3.3.6.5. Monitoring Outside the Firewall with an SSH Tunnel

If you run an SSH server on the machine that hosts the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and an SSH client on the machine that hosts the agent, you can create an SSH tunnel so that the agent can bypass your firewall. First, you need to make an adjustment to the hostname value specified in the [mysql-proxy] section of the .ini file. (For more information about the contents and location of the .ini file see Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”.) Stop the agent and change the hostname value as shown in the following:

hostname = http://agent_name:password@localhost:18080/heartbeat

Replace the agent_name and password with suitable values. Likewise replace port 18080 if you are not running the dashboard on this port. Use localhost for the host name, since the agent is connecting through an SSH tunnel.

Next, execute the following command on the machine where the agent is running:

shell> ssh -L 18080:Dashboard_Host:18080 -l user_name -N Dashboard_Host

When prompted, enter the password for user_name.

If you are not running the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager on port 18080, substitute the appropriate port number. Likewise, replace Dashboard_Host with the correct value. user_name represents a valid operating system user on the machine that hosts the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

Be sure to restart the agent so that the new value for the hostname takes effect. For instructions on restarting the agent see:

15.3.3.6.6. Generating a new UUID

For MySQL Enterprise Monitor to operate correctly, each agent must have a unique UUID to uniquely identify the agent with the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

Warning

Ensure that you do not reuse or duplicate a UUID. Running two agents with the same identification number yields unpredictable results

In Unix go to the command line and type:

shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/bin/mysql-monitor-agent --agent-generate-uuid

In Mac OS X go to the command line and type:

shell> /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/bin/mysql-monitor-agent --agent-generate-uuid

This should display a line similar to the following:

ee9296d7-f7cd-4fee-8b26-ead884ebf398

Paste this line into the [mysql-proxy] section of the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file for the agent-uuid parameter:

[mysql-proxy]
...
agent-uuid=ee9296d7-f7cd-4fee-8b26-ead884ebf398

In Windows, go to the command line and change to the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent installation directory and update the UUID by executing mysql-monitor-agent -uf mysql-monitor-agent-3307.ini. For example:

C:\> cd C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Agent
C:\> mysql-monitor-agent -uf mysql-monitor-agent.ini (or your .ini file name)

This updates the configuration file directly with the new UUID.

15.3.3.7. Troubleshooting the Agent

The first step in troubleshooting the agent is finding out whether it is running or not. To do this see:

If incorrect credentials are specified for the agent login to the MySQL server that it is monitoring, then the agent will not run on start-up. Log in to the monitored MySQL server and check the agent's credentials. Compare the values of the Host, User, and Password fields in the mysql.user table with the values shown in the [mysqld] section of the etc/instances/mysql/agent-instance.ini. If incorrect credentials are specified in the ini file, simply correct them and restart the agent. Remember, changes to the ini file do not take effect until the agent is restarted.

The agent will not start up if incorrect credentials are specified for the service manager login. Using incorrect credentials for logging in to the service manager creates an entry in the agent log file. For the location of this log file see Agent Log and PID Files.

If the agent starts up but no server appears in the dashboard, check the hostname specified in the [mysql-proxy] portion of the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file. Incorrect credentials, IP address, or port will all cause the MySQL server to fail to appear in the dashboard. Also, ensure that the port specified in this file is not blocked on the machine hosting the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

An easy way to confirm that the agent can log in to the service manager is to type http://Dashboard_Host:18080/heartbeat into the address bar of your web browser, substituting the appropriate host name and port. When the HTTP authentication dialog box opens, enter the agent user name and password. If you log in successfully, you should see the following message:

<exceptions>
<error>E1031:  Agent payload parameter NULL.</error>
</exceptions>
Note

Despite the fact that the preceding listing shows an error, you have logged in successfully. This error appears because you have logged in but with no “payload”.

If you can log in successfully in the way described above and the agent is running, then there are errors in the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file. Compare the host name, port, agent name, and password found in the ini file with the values you entered into the address bar of your web browser.

If HTTP authentication fails then you are using incorrect credentials for the agent. Attempting to log in to the service manager using incorrect credentials creates an entry in the agent log file. For the location of this log file see Agent Log and PID Files.

If no HTTP authentication dialog box appears, and you are unable to connect at all, then you may have specified an incorrect host name or port. Confirm the values you entered against those described as the Application hostname and port: in the configuration_report.txt file. Failure to connect could also indicate that the port is blocked on the machine hosting the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

To check if a blocked port is the problem, temporarily bring down your firewall. If the agent is then able to connect, open up the port specified during installation and restart the agent. If necessary you can monitor outside the firewall using an SSH tunnel. For more information, see Section 15.3.3.6.5, “Monitoring Outside the Firewall with an SSH Tunnel”.

You can also check the agent error log file to help determine any problems. An error such as the following might indicate a blocked port:

(critical) connection to  merlin-server
'http://agent:[email protected]:18080/heartbeat' failed:
"connect() timed out!" error.

For the location of the agent error log file see, Agent Log and PID Files.

Setting the log-level entry in your ini file is also a good debugging technique. For more information on this subject see, Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”.

Running the agent from the command line sometimes displays errors that fail to appear in the log file or on the screen when the agent is started from a menu option. To start the agent from the command line see the instructions given at the start of this section.

If you have more than one agent running on the same machine, the UUID must be unique and the log-file and pid-file values must be different. For more information, see Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”.

If the agent is not running on the same machine that hosts the MySQL server it is monitoring, then you must ensure that the correct host is specified for the agent account. The correct port, typically 3306, must also be open for remote login. For more information about remote monitoring see, Section 15.3.3.6.4, “Configuring an Agent to Monitor a Remote MySQL Server”.

If the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent has been ungracefully terminated and restarted (for example after being terminated using kill), then you may see a DuplicateAgentUuidException error until the original registration of the previous instance of the agent has expired.

15.3.4. Unattended Installation

It is possible to install the MySQL Enterprise Monitor without any direct user interaction. This is done by passing the command-line option --mode unattended to the installation file.

Using this mode and other command-line parameters means the user will not be prompted for input during installation. This is especially useful when doing multiple installations of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

However, rather than passing numerous parameters from the command line, it is usually more convenient to save your options in a text file and invoke the installer using the optionfile option. This is a more reusable and less error-prone solution.

Before attempting an unattended installation, it is recommended that you install the MySQL Enterprise Monitor interactively at least once. Failing this, as a minimum, read the regular installation instructions since some tasks still remain after an unattended installation; you must configure the MySQL Enterprise settings, import the advisors, and start up all the services/daemons.

15.3.4.1. Command-Line Options

To view the available options for the monitor installer or for the agent installer, at the command line type the executable file name along with the --help option.

On each platform, for each installer, the installer supports a number of different installation modes. Some of these are unique to an individual platform, others are available on all platforms. The table below summarizes the different options available for each platform.

PlatformDefault Modewin32gtkxwindowosxtextunattended
Windowswin32YNNNNY
UnixgtkNYYNYY
LinuxgtkNYYNYY
Mac OS Xwin32NNNYYY
15.3.4.1.1. MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Options

The following listing shows the command line options for the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

--help                         Display the list of valid options

--version                      Display product information

--optionfile <optionfile>      Installation option file

                               Default:

--mode <mode>                  Installation mode
                               Default: win32
                               Allowed: win32 unattended

--debugtrace <debugtrace>      Debug filename
                               Default:

--installer-language <installer-language> Language selection
                               Default:
                               Allowed: en  jp

--installdir <installdir>      Installation directory
                               Default:/opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/

--tomcatport <tomcatport>      Tomcat Server Port
                               Default: 18080

--tomcatshutdownport <tomcatshutdownport> Tomcat Shutdown Port
                               Default: 18005

--tomcatsslport <tomcatsslport>Tomcat SSL Port
                               Default: 18443

--usessl <usessl>              Should communication between the Dashboard »
                                      and Service Manager be encrypted?
                               Default: 0


--adminuser <adminuser>        Repository Username
                               Default: service_manager


--adminpassword <adminpassword>Password
                               Default:

--dbport <dbport>              Bundled MySQL Database Port
                               Default: 13306

The options and their effect on installation are detailed below:

  • --help

    Display the list of valid options.

  • --version

    Display product and version information.

  • --optionfile

    The path to the option file containing the information for the installation.

  • --mode

    The installation mode to be used for this installation.

  • --debugtrace

    The filename to be used for a debug trace of the installation.

  • --installer-language

    The installer language; supported options are en for English and jp Japanese.

  • --installdir

    The installation directory for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

    The default on Windows is C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Monitor

    The default on Unix is /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor/

    The default on Mac OS X is /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor/

  • --tomcatport

    The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager port;

    The default is 18080.

  • --tomcatshutdownport

    The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Tomcat shutdown port.

    The default is 18005.

  • --tomcatsslport

    The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager SSL port.

    The default is 18443.

  • --usessl

    Enable support for SSL communication between the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent and MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

    The default is 0.

  • --adminuser

    The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager user name.

    The default is service_manager.

    Warning

    The repository user name and password are stored in unencrypted form in the config.properties file. To locate this file on your operating system see The config.properties File.

  • --adminpassword

    The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager password.

  • --dbport

    The TCP/IP port for the Bundled MySQL database.

    The default is 13306.

15.3.4.1.2. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Options

To view all the options available for an unattended agent installation, invoke the agent installer file passing in the help option. (Under Windows you must redirect the output to a file. You should see a listing similar to the following:

Note

The exact options may vary depending on the operating system on which you are executing the installer.

Usage:

 --help                         Display the list of valid options

 --version                      Display product information

 --optionfile <optionfile>      Installation option file
                                Default: 

 --unattendedmodeui <unattendedmodeui> Unattended Mode UI
                                Default: none
                                Allowed: none minimal minimalWithDialogs

 --mode <mode>                  Installation mode
                                Default: osx
                                Allowed: osx text unattended

 --debugtrace <debugtrace>      Debug filename
                                Default: 

 --installer-language <installer-language> Language selection
                                Default: 
                                Allowed: en ja

 --installdir <installdir>      Installation directory
                                Default: 

 --mysqlconnmethod <mysqlconnmethod> 
                                Default: tcpip
                                Allowed: tcpip socket

 --mysqlhost <mysqlhost>        MySQL hostname or IP address
                                Default: 127.0.0.1

 --checkmysqlhost <checkmysqlhost> Validate MySQL hostname or IP address
                                Default: yes

 --mysqlport <mysqlport>        MySQL Port
                                Default: 3306

 --mysqlsocket <mysqlsocket>    MySQL Socket
                                Default: 

 --mysqluser <mysqluser>        MySQL Username
                                Default: 

 --mysqlpassword <mysqlpassword> Password for mysql user
                                Default: 

 --enableproxy <enableproxy>    Enable Proxy (recommended)
                                Default: 1

 --proxyport <proxyport>        Proxy Port
                                Default: 6446

 --managerhost <managerhost>    Hostname or IP address
                                Default: 

 --managerport <managerport>    Tomcat Server Port
                                Default: 18080

 --managersslport <managersslport> Tomcat SSL Port
                                Default: 18443

 --usessl <usessl>              Use SSL?
                                Default: 0

 --agentuser <agentuser>        Agent Username
                                Default: agent

 --agentpassword <agentpassword> Agent Password
                                Default: 

 --proxyuser <proxyuser>        User Account
                                Default: root

The options and their effect on installation are detailed below:

  • --help

    Display the list of valid options

  • --version

    Display product information, including the version number of the installer.

  • --optionfile <optionfile>

    Specify the location of an option file containing the configuration options for this installation.

  • --unattendedmodeui <unattendedmodeui>

    The UI elements to use when performing an unattended installation. The options are none, show now UI elements during the installation; minimal, show minimal elements during installation; minimalWithDialogs, show minimal UI elements, but include the filled-dialog boxes.

    The default is none.

  • --mode <mode>

    Specify the installation mode to use for this installation.

  • --debugtrace <debugtrace>

    Set the filename to use when recording debug information during the installation.

  • --installer-language <installer-language>

    Set the language to be used for the installer.

  • --installdir <installdir>

    Specify the directory where the software will be installed.

    The default on Windows is C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Agent

    The default on Unix is /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/

    The default on Mac OS X is /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent/

  • --mysqlconnmethod <mysqlconnmethod>

    Specify the connection method to use to connect to MySQL.

    Options are tcpip and socket.

    The default is tcpip.

  • --mysqlhost <mysqlhost>

    MySQL hostname or IP address

    The default is 127.0.0.1.

  • --checkmysqlhost <checkmysqlhost>

    Validate the MySQL hostname or IP address

    The default is yes.

  • --mysqlport <mysqlport>

    Specify the TCP/IP port to use when connecting to MySQL.

    The default is 3306.

  • --mysqlsocket <mysqlsocket>

    Specify the filename of the MySQL socket to use when communicating with the monitored MySQL instance.

  • --mysqluser <mysqluser>

    Specify the username to use when connecting to the MySQL instance.

  • --mysqlpassword <mysqlpassword>

    Specify the password to use when connecting to the MySQL instance.

  • --enableproxy <enableproxy>

    Enable the Proxy. This is recommended and is required if you want to use Query Analyzer.

    The default is 1 (use the proxy).

  • --proxyport <proxyport>

    Specify the TCP/IP port to use for the proxy interface.

    The default is 6446.

  • --managerhost <managerhost>

    The hostname or IP address of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

  • --managerport <managerport>

    The port number of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

    The default is 18080.

  • --managersslport <managersslport>

    The port number of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager for SSL-based communication

    The default is 18443.

  • --usessl <usessl>

    Specifies whether SSL should be used to communicate with the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

  • --agentuser <agentuser>

    Specify the agent username to be used when communicating with the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

  • --agentpassword <agentpassword>

    Specify the agent password to be used when communicating with the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

  • --proxyuser <proxyuser>

    The user account for the proxy server.

    The default is root.

15.3.4.2. Unattended Windows Installation

For unattended installation on Windows, create an option file named options.server.txt. The following is an example of what the contents of an option file might be.

debugtrace=C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\install.debugtrace.log
mode=unattended
installdir=C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise
tomcatport=8080
tomcatshutdownport=8005
tomcatsslport=8443
adminpassword=myadminpassword
dbport=3300

This file identifies a directory and file name for a log file, sets the mode to unattended, and uses the installdir option to specify an installation directory. The meaning of the other options is fairly self-evident.

Note

Set the installdir and debugtrace options to values appropriate to your locale and operating system.

The only options that must be specified in an option file when installing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager are mode (if not specified at the command line), installdir, and adminpassword.

Check the options in your option file closely before installation; no warnings will be issued if there are errors.

Ensure that the monitor installer file and the options file are in the same directory and, if you saved the options file as options.server.txt, you can invoke an unattended installation from the command line by typing:

  C:\ mysqlmonitor-version-windows-installer.exe --optionfile options.server.txt

You can install the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent in exactly the same fashion. Create an agent option file and call the agent installer using the optionfile option.

As a minimum for the agent installation, you must specify the mode (if not specified at the command line), mysqluser, installdir, mysqlpassword, installdir, managerhost, and agentpassword options. Create a file containing these values and use it with the optionfile option for unattended agent installation.

If you wish, you can create one script that calls both the Service Manager and the Monitor Agent programs passing appropriate optionfile options.

15.3.4.3. Unattended Unix and Mac OS X Installation

For unattended installation on Unix, create an option file named options.server.txt. The following is an example of what the contents of an option file might be for installation on Unix.

debugtrace=/opt/mysql/enterprise/install.debugtrace.monitor.log
mode=unattended
installdir=/opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor
tomcatport=8080
tomcatshutdownport=8005
tomcatsslport=8443
adminpassword=myadminpassword
dbport=3300

This file identifies a directory and file name for a log file, sets the mode to unattended, and uses the installdir option to specify an installation directory. The meaning of the other options is fairly self-evident.

Note

Set the installdir and debugtrace options to values appropriate to your locale and operating system.

The only options that must be specified in an option file when installing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager are mode (if not specified at the command line), installdir, and adminpassword.

Check the options in your option file closely before installation; no warnings will be issued if there are errors.

Ensure that the monitor installer file and the options file are in the same directory and, if you saved the options file as options.server.txt, you can invoke an unattended installation from the command line by typing:

  shell> mysqlmonitor-version-installer.bin --optionfile options.server.txt

You can install the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent in exactly the same fashion. Create an agent option file and call the agent installer using the optionfile option.

As a minimum for the agent installation, you must specify the mode (if not specified at the command line), mysqluser, installdir, mysqlpassword, and agentpassword options. Create a file containing these values and use it with the optionfile option for unattended agent installation.

If you wish, you can create one script that calls both the Service Manager and the Monitor Agent programs passing appropriate optionfile options.

Note

The Service Manager does not automatically start up on rebooting. For more information, see Bug#31676.

The procedure for unattended agent installation under Mac OS X is identical to the procedure under Unix.

15.3.4.4. Starting the Services

For instructions on starting the services needed by the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager see, Section 15.3.2.5, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Windows” for Windows and, Section 15.3.2.6, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Unix and Mac OS X” for Unix and Mac OS X.

For instructions on starting the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent see:

If you wish, you can script the startup of these services.

15.3.5. Postinstallation Considerations

Depending upon how you plan to use the MySQL Enterprise Monitor, there are some tasks you may want to perform after installation. Find some suggestions in the following list:

  • Email settings: Test email notification by deliberately triggering an alert.

  • Auto Startup: On Unix systems, the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager does not automatically restart when the system is rebooted. You may wish to create a system initialization script appropriate to your operating system.

  • Log files: Check the log files for any irregularities. For the locations of the various log files see Files Associated with The MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

  • Agent Log file rotation: Implement log file rotation for the monitor agent.

  • Back up the repository: For a back-up strategy suitable to your circumstances, see the MySQL reference manual documentation.

  • Configuration backup: Back up the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file and the associated instances directory and contents.

    For more information about the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file see Section 15.3.3.6, “Advanced Agent Configuration”.

  • Configuration file: Store the configuration_report.txt in a safe place. There is no mechanism for retrieving the password stored in this file.

  • Repository credentials: The repository user name and password are stored in unencrypted form in the config.properties file. Take care to protect this file.

  • Disk management: Remove installation files, and monitor the space used by the repository. Ensure that you have adequate disk space by regularly purging data. For more information, see Data Purge Behavior.

  • Firewall changes: You may want to limit or expand access to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

  • Open ports: As with firewall changes, you may want to limit or expand access to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. The dashboard uses nonstandard ports, none of which are usually open by default.

  • Server upgrades: See Section 15.3.6.3.1, “Upgrading the Monitored MySQL Server” for instructions on upgrading a server.

  • Repository access: You may want to add other users.

15.3.6. Upgrading, Re-Installing or Changing Your Installation

You can upgrade MySQL Enterprise Monitor in a number of different ways:

15.3.6.1. Upgrading MySQL Enterprise Monitor

From time to time there may be updates to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager or the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent. This section describes how to perform an update for either of these components.

You cannot use the update installers to change to a different operating system or chip architecture. For example, you cannot update a 32-bit Linux installation to a 64-bit version using an update installer—in cases such as this you must do a fresh installation.

The installation and configuration of MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent must be standard before you start the installation. The update installer will not upgrade agents where you have changed or modified the filenames or directory layout of the installed agent, configuration files, or the startup files.

The name of the update file varies but it shows the target operating system and the version the update applies to. If a specific component is being updated it may also appear in the file name. For example, a file named mysqlenterprisemanager-2.0.0-windows-update-installer.exe would indicate a Windows update to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager version 2.0.0.

You may install an update in the same way that you initially installed the service manager or the agent; in win32 or unattended mode on Windows in gtk, text, xwindow, or unattended mode on Unix and in osx, text , or unattended mode on OS X.

Warning

The method you use for upgrading MySQL Enterprise Monitor components will depend on the upgrade you are performing.

  • If you are upgrading between major versions (for example, from MySQL Enterprise Monitor 1.3 to merlin 2.0), you should shutdown the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and each connected MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent. Once you have shutdown each component, start by updating the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, and then updating the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on each monitored client.

  • If you are upgrading between the same major version, for example, MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0 to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.1, or a minor version, such as MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.1.1 to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.1.2, you can shutdown only the component (agent, or server) you are updating. Using this method, you can perform a 'rolling' upgrade, where you shutdown a single MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent, upgrade it to the latest agent version, and then restart the agent before moving on to the next monitored instance.

Important

The upgrade installer will overwrite items-mysql-monitor.xml. On Windows this file is found in the C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Agent\share\mysql-monitor-agent directory and on Unix in the /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/share/mysql-monitor-agent directory. You should back this file up if you have made any changes to it.

Warning

If you use the Upgrade installer to update MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and you have made any changes to the my.cnf within your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation, any changes will be lost. You should copy the existing my.cnf file before starting the upgrade installer.

Otherwise, updating is a fairly straightforward process. Run the installation file and choose the directory of your current installation and whether or not you wish to back up your current installation. The time required to complete the process varies depending upon the nature of the update.

If you chose to back up your current installation, a directory named backup will be created in the current installation directory. This directory will contain copies of the directory or directories that were replaced during the update. In cases where only specific files are replaced, the backup directory may contain only these files. If you are unhappy with the update simply overwrite the new files or directories with the originals found in the backup directory. Be sure to stop both the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent before restoring the original files. You can delete or archive this directory when you are satisfied that the update was successful.

If you choose to back up your current installation, the installer checks that there is adequate disk space for your repository backup. If there is not enough space, you are given the option of choosing another location; you may also choose not to back up the repository.

To update your Advisors see, Section 15.3.2.7.3, “Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in”.

15.3.6.1.1. Upgrading from MySQL Enterprise Monitor 1.3 to 2.0

To upgrade your existing installation from MySQL Enterprise Monitor 1.3 to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0, you need to upgrade both your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and your MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on each machine that you are monitoring.

To perform the update process you must use an update installer. This ensures that your current configuration information is migrated to the new version of MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

Before you start the migration, shutdown your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent on each monitored host. Then install the updated MySQL Enterprise Service Manager application to migrate the configuration and data of the main application and repository. Once the new MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is running, you can start to update and migrate each agent.

For more information on upgrading your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, see Section 15.3.6.1.1.1, “Upgrading to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager 2.0”. For more information on upgrading an MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent, see Section 15.3.6.1.1.2, “Upgrading to MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent 2.0”.

15.3.6.1.1.1. Upgrading to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager 2.0

Upgrading MySQL Enterprise Service Manager requires you to use on of the update installers. The update installer performs a number of operations during installation:

  • A new database, required to support 2.0 functionality, is created.

  • You core dashboard, user, and rule information is migrated from the old database to the new database.

  • The core configuration parameters for the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager are migrated from MySQL Enterprise Monitor 1.3 are migrated to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0.

The installation of the new software using the update installer follows this basic sequence:

  1. Request the installation language.

  2. Confirm the location of the current MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation.

  3. Specify whether you want to keep a copy of the old server, application, and database files.

  4. Configure the Tomcat server settings, including whether the new server should support SSL connections from agents.

  5. If requested, the application and database information is backed up and upgraded, before the new application is installed.

The installation process is consistent for all platforms. A sample of the process for Max OS X has been provided below:

  1. Double-click the update installer. The update installer will have update in the file name. For example, mysqlmonitor-2.0.0.7101-osx-update-installer.app.

  2. Confirm the language you want to use when installing the software.

    Figure 15.24. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server Update: Language Selection

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server
                  Update: Language Selection

    Click OK

  3. You will be presented with an information screen showing the application you are installing. Click Next to continue.

  4. Specify, or locate, the previous installation of MySQL Enterprise Service Manager If you installed the server within the default location, the current version of the application should be located automatically.

    Figure 15.25. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server Update: Previous Installation

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server
                  Update: Previous Installation
  5. The installer can keep a backup copy of your existing application, including keeping a complete backup of the data stored within your MySQL Enterprise Monitor repository database.

    Figure 15.26. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server Update: Backup of Previous Installation

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server
                  Update: Backup of Previous Installation

    Specify the location of the backup (default is to use the backup directory within your installation directory). Note that backing up the database in addition to the main application will increase the installation time as the files have to be copied. The larger the size of your repository data, the longer the installation process will take.

  6. Specify the Tomcat Server options. The Tomcat Server Port is the default port you will use to access the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard. If you want to support agents using SSL to communicate to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, you must check the Is SSL support required?

  7. Confirm that you want to continue the installation. Once installation has started, the backup of you existing application (and database) will start, although the process may take some time. Wait until the process completes.

  8. Once the process has completed you will be provided with a notification of the installation process, including how to uninstall the application if you want to do so in the future. If any errors occurred, they will be reported here.

    Figure 15.27. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server Update: Completed installing files

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server
                  Update: Completed installing files
  9. The installation has now completed. You can automatically start the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and view the attached Readme file by ensuring the checkboxes on this page are selected.

  10. You can now quit the installer.

Once the installation has completed, the first time you login to MySQL Enterprise Dashboard you will be asked to provide your login credentials, if they do not already exist in the server configuration, or to provide a copy of the Advisor jar suitable for your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager version.

Figure 15.28. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server Update: Final Setup

MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Server Update:
              Final Setup

MySQL Enterprise Monitor has now been updated. You must update each of your agents to MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent 2.0 to ensure that they are providing the correct information to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

15.3.6.1.1.2. Upgrading to MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent 2.0

To upgrade an agent you should use a update installer. This will migrate your configuration information, simplifying the upgrade process significantly.

Note

The agent log file, mysql-monitor-agent.log, if it exists, will be retained during the upgrade. A new log file, mysql-monitor-agent.log is used by MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent 2.0.

The core sequence is the same on all platforms, the update process on Linux is shown below:

  1. Start the update installer.

    shell> ./mysqlmonitoragent-2.0.0.7101-linux-glibc2.3-x86-32bit-update-installer.bin
  2. Set the language for the installation process.

    Language Selection
    
    Please select the installation language
    [1] English
    [2] Japanese
    Please choose an option [1] :
    
  3. Confirm or update the location of the installation directory of the previous version.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Welcome to the setup wizard for the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Update
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Please specify the directory that contains the previous installation of
    the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent
    
    Installation directory [/opt/mysql/enterprise/agent]:
        
  4. Specify whether you want to create a backup of the current application and configuration information, and if so, where the backup directory should be created.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Current installation backup
    
    Do you want to create a backup during the update process?
    
    Backup the current installation [Y/n]: Y
    
    
    Backup directory [/opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/patchbackup]:
    
          
  5. You will be asked whether you want to enable the Query Analyzer. The Query Analyzer enables you to monitor the execution stateistics for individual queries executed through your MySQL servers. To enable, you must specify the proxy port, MySQL server and MySQL server port that you want to use. If you do not enable Query Analyzer now, you can enable it later. See Section 15.10, “The Query Analyzer Page”.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Query Analyzer Configuration
    
    MySQL Proxy enables query monitoring and analysis by listening on the port
    specified below for client connections that are then passed through to a
    backend MySQL database server. It is not needed for basic monitoring
    functionality, but is required for query monitoring and analysis.
    
    Visit the following URL for more information:
    https://enterprise.mysql.com/docs/monitor/2.0/en/mem-query-analyzer.html
    
    
    
    Enable Proxy (recommended) [Y/n]:
    
    
    Proxy Port [6446]:
    
    Backend Host: 127.0.0.1   (cannot be changed)
    
    Backend Port: 3306   (cannot be changed)
          
  6. You are now ready to complete the installation. Confirm that you want to continue.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Setup is now ready to begin installing MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Update on your computer.
    
    Do you want to continue? [Y/n]:
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Please wait while Setup installs MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Update on your computer.
    
     Installing
     0% ______________ 50% ______________ 100%
     #########################################
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Setup has finished installing MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Update on your computer.
    
    Restart MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent now [Y/n]:
    
    View Readme File [Y/n]: n
          

Before connecting your MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to your MySQL server you must update the grants for the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent. Connect to the MySQL server and run this statement to update the required grants:

GRANT CREATE, INSERT
  ON mysql.*
  TO  'mysqluser'@'localhost'
  IDENTIFIED BY 'agent_password';

Replacing the mysqluser and agent_password parameters with the values used for connecting your agent to your MySQL server.

Once the update agent has communicated with the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager the core information about the agent and the MySQL server it is monitoring will be migrated to the new data format required by MySQL Enterprise Service Manager 2.0. To migrate the existing stored data, see Section 15.12.9, “Migrating 1.3.x Historical Data to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0”.

15.3.6.1.2. Upgrading to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.1

When upgrading to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.1 you should be aware of the following issues:

  • During the upgrade process, if you had previously set a Query Analyzer data purge value that was greater than the standard data purge value, the historical data collection purge period will be set to the Query Analyzer purge period. This will be logged in the upgrade log with the following notice:

    getDataCollectionPurgeLifespan now: 4 weeks (was: 2 weeks)
15.3.6.1.3. Unattended MySQL Enterprise Monitor Update

The options available when performing an unattended MySQL Enterprise Service Manager update are as follows:

--help                         Display the list of valid options

--version                      Display product information

--optionfile <optionfile>      Installation option file
                               Default:

--mode <mode>                  Installation mode
                               (Windows)Default: win32
                               (Unix)Default: gtk
                               (Mac OS X)Default: osx
                               (Windows)Allowed: win32 unattended
                               (Unix)Allowed: gtk text xwindow unattended
                               (Mac OS X)Allowed: osx text unattended

--debugtrace <debugtrace>      Debug filename
                               Default:

--installer-language <installer-language> Language selection
                                Default:
                                Allowed: en  jp

--installdir <installdir>      Previous Installation
                               Default:

--createDataBackup <createDataBackup>

                               Default: 1

--backupDir <backupDir>        Backup directory
                               Default:

The options for an unattended update of the agent differ only in that the createDataBackup option is replaced by createBackup.

If you did not install the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager to the default directory the installdir option must be specified. mode must also be specified when performing an unattended update. Otherwise, performing an unattended update is identical to the process described in Section 15.3.4, “Unattended Installation”.

15.3.6.2. Reinstalling MySQL Enterprise Monitor

In some cases you may want to reinstall MySQL Enterprise Monitor rather than updating your current installation. To reinstall rather than update MySQL Enterprise Monitor follow these steps:

  1. Stop all the Monitor Agents

  2. Run the uninstall programs for both the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent

  3. Begin the new installation

To stop the Monitor Agents see:

Instructions for removing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent are given in Section 15.3.7, “Uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Monitor”.

15.3.6.3. Changing Your MySQL Enterprise Monitor Installation

This section describes the best practices to employ when changing your MySQL Enterprise Monitor installation.

15.3.6.3.1. Upgrading the Monitored MySQL Server

When upgrading a monitored MySQL server first stop the agent. To stop the agent see:

Stop the MySQL server and perform the upgrade. For instructions on stopping and restarting the MySQL service under Windows see Section 15.3.2.5, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Windows”.

To stop and restart the MySQL daemon under Unix and Mac OS X, see, Section 15.3.2.6, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Unix and Mac OS X”.

Once the service/daemon is stopped you may upgrade your server. For instructions on upgrading your MySQL server see the reference manual pertaining to your server version. When the upgrade is complete restart the MySQL server.

Note

The agent's log file will show that the server was down.

15.3.6.3.2. Changing the Server That an Agent Monitors

You need not reinstall the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to change the MySQL server that it monitors. It is possible to adapt an existing agent so that it monitors a different server.

To do this you must stop the monitor agent and then remove the server that it is monitoring. To stop the agent see:

For instructions on removing a server see, Section 15.5.3.3, “Removing a Server From the Dashboard”.

Once the agent is stopped and the server is removed from the Dashboard, changes may be made to the mysql-monitor-agent.ini, or the agent-instance.ini file within the agent instances instances directory. You can find the location of the directory by examining the content of the mysql-monitor-agent.ini and checking the value of the mysqld-instance-dir parameter.

If you want to make changes to the monitored MySQL server, edit the agent-instance.ini file. Change the user, password, hostname, and port values if required. For more information, see Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”.

To change other settings, such as enabling proxy support (required for Query Analyzer), the management host, or the port number used by the agent, modify the mysql-monitor-agent.ini file. For more information, see Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”.

To restart the agent see:

Note

If you are adapting an existing agent to monitor a remote server make sure that the agent has the credentials for remote access and that the port on the remote MySQL server instance is open. For more information, see Section 15.3.3.6.4, “Configuring an Agent to Monitor a Remote MySQL Server”.

If you experience difficulties starting the agent, check Section 15.3.3.7, “Troubleshooting the Agent”.

Log in to the Dashboard and you should find your new server in the All Servers group.

15.3.6.3.3. Temporarily Suspending the Agent

In some situations you may need to bring down a monitored server. When this is necessary, it is good practice to stop the agent first—doing so will avoid generating a “Server is unreachable” event.

For instance, suppose you need to stop the server to do a backup. The steps to follow are:

  1. Stop the agent

  2. Stop the service/daemon

  3. Perform the backup

  4. Restart the service/daemon

  5. Restart the agent

To stop or start the agent see:

To stop the MySQL service/daemon see the MySQL reference manual for your server version. You can find the manual online at http://dev.mysql.com/doc.

Follow these steps and there will be no “noise” associated with backing up your server. In contrast, if you leave the agent running while bringing down the server, you will generate a “Server is unreachable” event.

As an alternative to stopping the agent, you can change the logic associated with a rule. For instance, you could alter the threshold of the rule “Server is unreachable”:

%server.reachable% == THRESHOLD

to:

%server.reachable% == THRESHOLD  && CURTIME() NOT BETWEEN '22:00:00' AND '23:00:00'

This would effectively blackout the rule between 10 and 11 pm, during which time you could perform a backup.

For more information about editing rules see Section 15.7.3, “Editing Built-in Rules”. To blackout all events associated with a specific server or group of servers see Section 15.7.7, “Advisor Blackout Periods”.

15.3.7. Uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Monitor

Removal of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor requires removal of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Service. In some circumstances, when running multiple agents on one machine for instance, you may not want to remove the entire MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Service but only a single monitored server.

15.3.7.1. Removing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Windows

Removing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

Remove the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager by going to the Control Panel and choosing Add or Remove Programs. Find the entry for MySQL Enterprise Monitoring and Advisory Service and remove it. During the uninstall process you will be given the option of saving existing data and log files. Choose this option if you plan to reinstall the MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

If you are not saving existing data, after MySQL Enterprise Service Manager has been removed you may delete the C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Monitor directory.

Warning

If you chose not to remove existing data and log files when uninstalling MySQL Enterprise Service Manager do not remove the C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Monitor directory. Doing so will delete these files.

If you added the Tomcat/Apache web server to the list of Windows firewall exceptions, remove this service by opening the Windows Firewall from the Control Panel. Choose the Exceptions tab and delete the Tomcat/Apache entry.

Removing MySQL Enterprise Monitor Services Only

When the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is installed, the Tomcat/Apache and MySQL server services are started. It is possible to remove these services without also removing your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation. For more information about these services see, Section 15.3.2.5, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Windows”.

Do this by finding the MySQL Enterprise Monitor menu option and choosing Services and then Uninstall MySQL Enterprise Monitor Services. This will remove all the services associated with MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

You can confirm that these services have been removed by checking services in the Microsoft Management Console Services window.

If you wish to reinstall these services you can do this by using the Install MySQL Enterprise Monitor Services menu option.

It is also possible to remove services using the mysqlmonitorctl.bat file found in the C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Monitor directory. To see the available options, go to the command line and type: myqlnetworkctrl help. This batch file is discussed in more detail in Section 15.3.2.5, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Windows”.

Removing the Monitor Agent

To remove the Monitor Agent itself, open the Control Panel and choose Add or Remove Programs. Find the entry for MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent and remove it. This will execute the uninstall program located in the C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL\Enterprise\Agent directory.

Warning

If you are running more than one agent on the same machine and wish to remove only one of the agents, do not remove the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent entry from the Add or Remove Programs menu. To remove a single agent see Removing a Single Agent.

After removing the Monitor Agent you may also need to remove the directories, C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise and C:\Program Files\MySQL\Enterprise\Agent.

Removing the Monitor Agent in this fashion will remove the default service. However, if you are running additional Monitor Agents as described in Section 15.3.3.6.2, “MySQL Server (agent-instance.ini) Configuration”, you will have to remove those agents manually. See the next section for instructions on doing this.

Removing a Single Agent

If you are running more than one agent on the same machine and wish to remove only one of the agents, do not remove the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent entry from the Add or Remove Programs menu. To remove a single agent and leave other agents intact follow these steps:

  1. Stop the agent

  2. Confirm the location of the log files

  3. Remove the agent as a service

  4. Remove/Archive the associated files

It is best to stop the agent before removing it; for instructions on stopping an agent see, Section 15.3.3.5.1, “Starting/Stopping the Agent on Windows”.

You can confirm the location of the agent log files by checking the ini file. For more information on this topic see Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”.

Go to the command line and remove the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent as a Windows service by typing:

shell> sc delete AgentName

You can confirm that the agent has been removed by checking the Microsoft Management Console Services window. There should no longer be an entry for the removed agent.

You should also remove or archive any log or configuration files associated with this agent. If you have installed any additional agents, remove them in the same fashion.

15.3.7.2. Removing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Unix

Removing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

To remove the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, find the uninstall file in the /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor directory.

Execute this file by typing:

shell> ./uninstall

During the uninstall process you will be given the option of saving existing data and log files. Choose this option if you plan to reinstall the MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

If you are not saving existing data, after uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager you may remove the /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor directory.

Warning

If you chose not to remove existing data and log files when uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Monitor do not remove the /opt/mysql/enterprise/monitor directory; doing so will delete these files.

On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 and Fedora Core 4, the uninstall script may not stop the Tomcat server. Do this manually if necessary. To do this see, Section 15.3.2.6, “Starting/Stopping the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Service on Unix and Mac OS X”.

There may be other Java processes running on your system. Be careful not to accidentally stop them.

On some Unix platforms, inluding HP-UX, you may have to manually delete the uninstall application and the installation directory after you have execute the uninstall process.

Removing the Monitor Agent

Prior to removal of the Monitor Agent Service you should stop any agents. Do this by changing to the init.d directory and issuing the command, ./mysql-monitor-agent stop.

You will find the uninstall file in the /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent directory. Execute this file by navigating to this directory and typing:

shell> ./uninstall

After uninstalling the Monitor Agent you may remove the /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent directory.

Removing the Monitor Agent in this fashion will remove the default service, and all the configuration files for different instances.

Removing a Single Agent

If you are running more than one agent on the same machine and wish to remove only one of the agents, do not run the uninstall program. To remove a single agent and leave other agents intact follow these steps:

  1. Stop the agent

  2. Confirm the location of the log files

  3. Remove the agent as a service

  4. Remove/Archive associated files

It is best to stop the agent before removing it; for instructions on stopping an agent see Section 15.3.3.5.3, “Starting/Stopping the Agent on Unix”.

You can confirm the location of the agent log files by checking the ini file. For more information on this topic see Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”.

You may then remove the agent as a daemon by removing its entry in the init.d directory. You should also remove or archive any log or configuration files associated with this agent.

If you have installed any additional agents, remove them in the same fashion.

15.3.7.3. Removing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Mac OS X

Removing the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

To remove the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, run the uninstall.app located in the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor/ directory, or the root directory of your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation.

During the uninstall process you will be given the option of saving existing data and log files. Choose this option if you plan to reinstall the MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

If you are not saving existing data, after uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager you may remove the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor directory.

Warning

If you chose not to remove existing data and log files when uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Monitor do not remove the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/monitor directory; doing so will delete these files.

Removing the Monitor Agent

Prior to removal of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent you should stop any agents. Do this by changing to the init.d directory and issuing the command:

shell> ./mysql-monitor-agent stop

Run the uninstall.app file located in the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent directory.

After uninstalling the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent you may remove the /Applications/mysql/enterprise/agent directory.

Removing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent in this fashion will remove the default service, and all the configuration files for different instances.

Removing a Single Agent

If you are running more than one agent on the same machine and wish to remove only one of the agents, do not run the uninstall program.

To remove a single agent and leave other agents intact follow these steps:

  1. Stop the agent

  2. Confirm the location of the log files

  3. Remove the agent as a daemon

  4. Remove/Archive associated files

It is best to stop the agent before removing it; for instructions on stopping an agent see Section 15.3.3.5.2, “Starting/Stopping the Agent on Mac OS X”.

You can confirm the location of the agent log files by checking the ini file. For more information on this topic see Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”.

You may then remove the agent as a daemon by removing its entry in the init.d directory.

You should also remove or archive any log or configuration files associated with this agent.

If you have installed any additional agents, remove them in the same fashion.

15.4. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

The purpose of the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard is to provide you with information about your MySQL servers. It provides a list of the latest MySQL Enterprise Advisor reports, server status information, MySQL Enterprise alerts, and updated views of monitored MySQL servers. The Monitor screen gives a quick overview of the status of your MySQL servers.

The MySQL Enterprise Dashboard interface is provided through a standard web browser. For more details on the supported browsers, see Section 15.12.2, “Supported Browsers”.

You can open the Dashboard and connect to the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard either using the standard HTTP protocol, or using an SSL connection (HTTPS). By default, you can connect to MySQL Enterprise Dashboard using http://host:18080, where host is the hostname or IP address of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. The default SSL URL is http://host:18443. These values can be overridden during installation. You can check the configured values by looking at the configuration_report.txt file within your installation directory.

Note

If you are connecting using SSL, the built-in certificate has been self-signed and may be highlighted as 'unsafe' within the browser on initial connection. You should add an exception for the certificate on this server to prevent problems accessing the site.

The Monitoring page provides an instant health check for all of the MySQL servers across the enterprise.

From this page users can:

  • View monitoring data and all critical MySQL Advisor Rule violations for all or selected servers.

  • Close and annotate MySQL Advisor Rule violations.

  • Quickly determine if there is a Monitor Agent that is not communicating with the Service Manager.

  • Quickly determine if there is a server that is in trouble or completely down.

  • View indicator value graphs for key MySQL and operating system (OS) level metrics. Graph presentation will default to a thumbnail view but will open into a larger image upon being clicked.

The monitored server or servers are displayed in a tab on the left known as the Server Tree. You can navigate to a number pages that provide more detailed information. These pages include:

  • Monitor: The overview page providing you with a quick summary of the servers, their status, events, availability and load. The remainder of this chapter details the contents of this page.

  • Advisors: Shows the various advisors configured in your installation and allows you to schedule their execution on different servers, apply and manage rules and manage the advisor installation itself. For more information, see Section 15.7, “The Advisors Page”.

  • Events: Provides an interface into the event system that highlights specific issues and problems on your monitored servers. For more information on using Events, see Section 15.8, “The Events Page”.

  • Query Analyzer: Interfaces to the query monitoring system that can be used to monitor and track the individual queries that are being executed on a system and help to highlight problem queries that may need optimization or that may be affecting server load. For more information, see Section 15.10, “The Query Analyzer Page”.

  • Graphs: Enables you to view and configure a number of individual graphcs covering a range of different statistics. For more details on how to view and use these graphs, see Section 15.9, “The Graphs Page”.

  • Replication: Provides information on the status and structure of your servers that are using replication. This page is only available if you have a suitable subscription level. For more information, see Section 15.11, “The Replication Page”.

  • Settings: Controls the settings for the server, including email configuration, passwords, and server and user management. For more information, see Section 15.5, “The Settings Page”.

Graphs are shown in the center of the page beneath the tabs. If applicable, you'll also find a list of critical events.

On the right is the color-coded Heat Chart, showing the advisors that are installed by default. The Heat Chart shows the most important advisors, allowing a quick overview of the state of your servers. You may open the Heat Chart in its own window by clicking the Standalone Heat Chart link. If applicable, you'll also find a list of critical events.

The Show/Hide Legend link toggles display of the key to the icons used in the Heat Chart.

Note

Find colorblind-accessible icons in the alternate directory. On Linux this directory is immediately below the /monitor/apache-tomcat/webapps/ROOT/web/resources/images/ directory. These images are stored in the same directory on Windows. To use them, backup the originals and then copy and paste the alternate set into the images directory.

If a specific server is selected in the Server Tree details about this server are shown beneath the legend in the Meta Info area. The information shown in this area is the host name, the MySQL version number, the number of scheduled rules, the operating system, and the CPU.

The Meta Info section also shows how long the agent has been running, when it last contacted the MySQL server it is monitoring, and the last time the agent contacted the dashboard. Mouse over the date shown beside Up Since and a pop-up box displays the time that has elapsed since the server instance was last started. You can also mouse over the Last MySQL Contact and the Last Agent Contact dates.

Note

In the case of remote monitoring, the agent runs on a different machine than the MySQL server that it is monitoring. The Hostname, MySQL, and Rules information applies to the system being monitored. The OS and CPU information applies to the machine on which the agent is running. For more information about remote monitoring see, Section 15.3.3.6.4, “Configuring an Agent to Monitor a Remote MySQL Server”.

The top of the screen shows the refresh cycle and Help and Log Out links. Click the Help link to open the documentation in a separate browser window. Choose Log Out if you wish to leave the Dashboard or to log in as a different user. Different refresh rates are available from the drop-down listbox.

In the footer are external links to MySQL Enterprise and information about the current user. Users can remain connected to the Dashboard and update their subscription, use the Enterprise Knowledge Base, and contact technical support. Your subscription information is also displayed here, showing the number of days remaining and the number of licenses. The number of licenses indicates to the number of machines that may be monitored; any number of MySQL servers may be running on a specific machine.

The footer also contains a link to the Settings page. If your subscription is current it reads Subscription is up-to-date. More info..... For more information about the Settings page see Section 15.5.7, “The Product Information Screen”.

15.4.1. The Server Tree

The tab on the left displays the Server tree. By default the first group of servers is selected. This selection determines the information shown on the Monitor page.

If a server group is selected, the information presented on the Monitor page is aggregate information for this group; if only one server is selected the information applies to that server only.

Change your server selection and the information shown in the graphs and in the Heat Chart changes.

Note

For more information about server groups see, Section 15.5.3.2, “Grouping Servers”.

The individual server, or server group, selected in the Server Tree also determines what information appears when the Advisors tab or the Events tab is selected.

The Server Tree presents an easy way to navigate to different groups or to specific servers.

15.4.2. The Server Graphs and Critical Events

The center of the Monitor page gives a visual representation of the state of your servers.

Figure 15.29. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: The Graphs Screen

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: The Graphs panel

The graphs present information about the currently selected server or server group. The default graphs show the hit ratios, CPU utilization, connections, and database activity for a specific interval.

Graphs also provide an entry point for examining the operations on a server in relation to the queries that were being on the server at the time. The plots of the graph are correlated with the queries that are being executed at that time, enabling you to monitor your server usage more effectively. By clicking and dragging on a graph you can zoom in on the graph content and then view the queries that were being executed during the specified period to gain a better insight into the operation of your servers. This information is only available if you have configured query analysis, and have enabled query analysis for the servers you are monitoring. For more information, see Section 15.10, “The Query Analyzer Page”.

To set the interval click the configure graphs link immediately below the graphs. This opens a dialog box where you can choose the default interval for the x-axis of the graphs. Defining a shorter or longer interval gives you a shorter or longer term view of server activity. The thumbnail and full-size graph dimensions can also be adjusted from this dialog box. Save any changes that you have made and the values chosen will be the defaults whenever you log in.

You can also choose the default graphs shown on the Monitor page. To do this click the edit favorites link and choose the graphs you want from the drop-down list box. To choose contiguous graphs, hold down the Shift key and click the desired graphs. For a noncontiguous selection, click the desired graphs while holding down the Ctrl key. The maximum number of graphs that can be displayed on the Monitor page is six. Save your changes and these will be the default graphs whenever you log in.

Color coding helps distinguish different aspects of each graph. With Database Activity for example, you can readily distinguish SELECT statements from database insertions.

Clicking a graph opens a detailed view with Graph Display and Configure tabs. Choose the Configure tab to temporarily change the way that a graph displays. Changes made from this tab only apply to the standalone graph while it is open. Persistent changes are made as described above.

Dismiss the enlarged graph by clicking the hide button.

Alerts from the event system will be displayed immediately below the charts. For more information on the events display, see Section 15.8, “The Events Page”.

15.4.3. The Heat Chart

The Heat Chart is found on the right side of the Monitor page and shows the status of critical rules. Monitored servers are organized by groups. To view the status of a specific server, click the + button next to the appropriate server group.

Whenever a new agent contacts the Service Manager for the first time, all the rules in the Heat Chart Advisor are automatically activated. These Advisors monitor the status of the server and agent, critical operating system indicators, and important events related to your MySQL servers. An example follows.

Figure 15.30. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: The Heat Chart

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: The Heat Chart

To interpret the Heat Chart see the following legend.

Figure 15.31. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: The Heat Chart Legend

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: The Heat Chart
          legend

The status unknown will typically apply when an agent is down and can no longer report the status of the server that it is monitoring. The status unknown may also apply if the data collection that should be collected is not available on the server being monitored.

You may open the Heat Chart in its own browser window by clicking the Standalone Heat Chart link immediately below the Heat Chart on the left. If you like, the refresh rate can be set to a different rate than the setting on the Monitor page.

In addition to showing the most important advisors, the Heat Chart also has columns that display the number of critical, warning, and informational alarms. Clicking the hyperlink in any one of these columns takes you to the Event screen, which gives more detailed information. For more information about events see, Section 15.8, “The Events Page”.

When the Dashboard is first installed no notification groups are associated with the Advisors shown in the Heat Chart. For more information on this topic see, Section 15.3.2.7.3, “Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in” and, Section 15.5.5, “Manage Notification Groups”.

15.5. The Settings Page

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

Upon initial installation you may have configured your MySQL Enterprise credentials and also outgoing email settings. This section explores the configuration settings in more detail, and also shows how to manage servers, users, notification groups, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) traps, log files, and the product information screen.

Knowledge of server management is a prerequisite for properly configuring advisors—the subject of Section 15.7, “The Advisors Page”.

To get to the Settings page open the Dashboard and choose the Settings tab.

15.5.1. Global Settings

The Global Settings control the main confirguration parameters for the entire MySQL Enterprise Monitor system, including your email notifications, data purge, and Enterprise website credentials.

Figure 15.32. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Settings

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Settings

The Global Settings page is divided into a number of different sections:

  • Outgoing Email Settings

    Configures the settings for email notifications by MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. You must configure the From Address SMTP Server settings. If your server requires authorization, complete the necessary server login details, and whether SSL is required.

    You can test your configuration immediately by adding an email address to the On Save, Send Test Email Message to box.

    For more information about Outgoing Email Settings see, Section 15.3.2.7.5, “Outgoing Email Settings”.

  • SNMP Traps

    The SNMP Traps section of the Global Settings tab allows you to enable Simple Network Management Protocol so that your Network Management System (NMS) can handle events created by the MySQL Enterprise Monitor. SNMP notifications are off by default. You can enable them by clicking the Enable SNMP Notifications checkbox.

    MySQL Enterprise Service Manager includes support for both SNMPv1 and SNMPv2. You can select the SNMP version to use by clicking the corresponding Use SNMPv1 or Use SNMPv2 radio button.

    In the Target 1 or Target 2 text box enter the IP address or hostnames of your NMS listeners. The port number defaults to the well-known SNMP port, 162. If you are not using this port, enter the port that your Network Management System is listening on.

    Enter the appropriate community string in the Community String text box. The default value for this string is public.

    For the trap address for Advisor traps, you can optionally elect to use the address of the agent that triggered the alert, rather than the address of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. To do this, click the Use the remote MySQL agent host IP address as the SNMP trap agent address for Advisor traps. For internally generated SNMP traps (i.e. with MySQL Enterprise Service Manager) you can also specify an alternate address by putting the IP address in the SNMP trap agent address for internally generated traps box.

    To ensure that the target you have specified is valid, check the On Save, Send Test Trap check box. The remaining check boxes help you to configure how your NMS responds to MySQL Enterprise Monitor. Check the Up/Down Application check box to configure NMS for starting up or shutting down the MySQL Enterprise Monitor. For configuration of advisor events choose a level of severity and check the Advisor event with the severity of Critical check box. Finally, choose the Application Error check box to configure NMS to support application error traps. Be sure to save your settings before exiting.

    If you wish to enable SNMP traps globally, check the Enable SNMP Notifications checkbox. To enable SNMP traps only for specific rules run against specific servers or server groups leave this checkbox unchecked—enabling specific SNMP traps is done as rules are scheduled. For instructions on doing this see Section 15.7.2, “Scheduling Rules”.

    The Management Information Base (MIB) file associated with SNMP trapping is called MONITOR.MIB. For the location this file see The Management Information Base (MIB) File.

    Note

    The MIB file supplied with MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is not directly compatible with OpenNMS. For a sample of the modifications that need to be made, please see the comments for Bug#41714.

  • Server Locale

    The Server Locale setting determines the language of notification for the following items:

    • Email notifications

    • SNMP traps

    • The naming conventions for shared resources such as a replication group name prefix

    The initial value in this drop down list box is the locale for the OS on which the Dashboard is running.

  • Server Hostname

    You can alter the hostname and port used to identify the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager when reporting notifications. This can be useful if the server hostname, and the hostname you want to use when connecting to your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

    Note

    Only change the Port setting if you have altered or redirected the original port used when installing MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. Entering the incorrect information will not affect the accessibility of your system, except when clicking links within the notification messages.

    You can also alter the name for the server displayed in the login page by changing the value in the Login Display Name. You may want to use this to display an organizational or divisional title, rather than the hostname, of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

  • Data Purge Behavior

    The Data Purge Behavior section of the Global Preferences page lets you remove old log files and also old data from the repository. The default purge interval is 28 days. If you wish to purge data, change this setting by choosing from the drop-down list. Choosing 52 weeks, for example, will remove all data that is older than a year.

    Warning

    Purging data will permanently remove information from the repository. Since events are derived from data contained in the repository, they will be purged along with the data.

    Ensure that there is adequate disk space for the repository. If you are monitoring numerous servers and running many rules the size of the repository can increase rapidly. Choose purge behavior accordingly.

    The default value for purging, never, is the safest option. However, please choose a purge setting that makes sense for your environment.

    Note

    The purge process is started approximately once every minute. If you change the purge duration from a larger timespan to a smaller one, the data may start to be purged immediately.

    You can configure the data purge behavior for a number of different systems individually:

    • Remove Historical Data Collection Older Than configures the duration that the main data about your servers is retained. This includes all data collections, including CPU, memory and connections and activity statistics.

    • Remove Service Manager Logs Older Than configures the duration that the main MySQL Enterprise Service Manager logs are retained.

    • Remove Query Analyzer Data Older Than configures the duration that the query analyzer statistics and information about individual queries is retained.

    Notes for setting purge behavior:

    • Purging can be carried out manually by enabling the innodb_file_per_table for the repository database and then using an OPTIMIZE TABLE operation to reclaim space from deleted rows in the table.

    • If you set the purge value to a very low timespan value when the previous setting was quite high then the space used for the data that was purged will not be reclaimed from the InnoDB tablespaces. You can do this by running OPTIMIZE TABLE on the MySQL tables for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager to reclaim the space from the purged rows.

    • You cannot set the Query Analyzer purge period to a value greater than historical data collection purge period. If you attempt to do so you will get a warning: An invalid Query Analyzer data life span was given. Value may not be larger than data life span..

  • Remote Server Inventory Schedule

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor keeps track of all the databases and tables in a server, as well as the amount of RAM, disk space, and other items. A re-inventory updates this information in case you have added or dropped databases and tables. Depending upon the configuration of your system, this operation can tax resources. If you are monitoring many remote servers this is an operation you may want to perform in off-peak hours only.

  • MySQL Enterprise Credentials

    You can specify the credentials for logging into the MySQL Enterprise Website. These should match the user name and password that you have registered with MySQL for your enterprise subscription.

    Note

    Only administrators can change the MySQL Enterprise Credentials section or enter a product key; for other users, this section does not show up in the interface. For more information about different users and their rights see Section 15.5.4, “Managing Users”. Specifying incorrect credentials results in the error message, “Your credentials do not appear to be valid.

  • HTTP Proxy Settings

    You may want to update your HTTP Proxy Settings if your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is not directly connected to the internet. The proxy settings will be used when updating the information within the What's New page and when accessing the MySQL Enterprise Website for authentication of your license and product key information. For more information, see Section 15.6, “The What's New Page”.

  • MySQL Enterprise Product Key

    You may update your MySQL Enterprise Product Key. If you do not have access to the Internet from the Dashboard, this provides an alternate way to update or activate the MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

    To enter your product key first download it from the MySQL Enterprise website. Copy the key to a location accessible from the Dashboard. Use the Browse button to locate the key and then press the save button.

    If you wish to switch from using your MySQL Enterprise credentials to using a product key to update MySQL Enterprise Monitor, you must first clear your credentials. Do this by removing the email address from the MySQL Enterprise Credentials section and then clicking the save button. You may then enter and save your MySQL Enterprise product key.

    Note

    Only administrators can change the MySQL Enterprise Credentials section or enter a product key; for other users, this section does not show up in the interface. For more information about different users and their rights see Section 15.5.4, “Managing Users”. Specifying incorrect credentials results in the error message, “Your credentials do not appear to be valid.

  • Advisor Bundle

    You can update your Advisor Bundle and the associated rules and graphs by importing a new Advisor Bundle. To update your Advisor Bundle using a bundle file that you have previous downloaded:

    1. Click Choose File and locate your Advisor Bundle on your computer.

    2. Click save to upload the updated bundle and validate the contents.

    To update the Advisor Bundle automatically from the MySQL Enterprise Website using your existing MySQL Enterprise Credentials, click the update advisors button.

15.5.2. User Preferences

On this page users can change their passwords, user names, and locale information.

Figure 15.33. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: User Preferences

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: User Preferences

Change your password by entering a new value into the Password text box. To change your user name enter a new value into the Username text box. Click the save user properties button to commit this change.

You may also adjust your time zone and locale information from this page. The settings on this page apply only to the user who is currently logged in.

The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager determines the default value for the locale by looking at your browser settings. Changing this value, determines the language setting for any future logins to the Dashboard, overriding your browser settings.

Note

Be sure to set the correct time zone so that alerts are time stamped correctly.

This setting applies only to the specific user.

15.5.3. Manage Servers

To help with server management, the Service Manager supports the logical grouping of MySQL servers. This allows you to group servers in any fashion you choose. For example, you can manage servers according to purpose. You can group servers by whether the servers handle Internet or intranet data, by whether they power finance or HR applications, or, if you prefer, you may organize them by physical location rather than by functionality.

Figure 15.34. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Manage Servers

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Manage Servers

For a server to appear in the Dashboard there must be an agent monitoring it. If you wish to add a server to the Dashboard follow the procedure for installing an agent found at Section 15.3.3, “Monitor Agent Installation”. Instructions for adding a remote server are found at Section 15.3.3.6.4, “Configuring an Agent to Monitor a Remote MySQL Server”.

The Manage Servers panel also allows you control the Query Analyzer and Data Migration. For more information, see Section 15.10.7, “Query Analyzer Settings” and Section 15.12.9, “Migrating 1.3.x Historical Data to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0”.

Note

The All Servers group is built in and every monitored server is a member of this group.

15.5.3.1. Renaming a Server

You can rename an existing server without losing the current historical data or configuration information. Renaming the server also allows you to modify the name of the server to be more descriptive according to the server's role within your organization. For example, you may want to rename a server from the default host name to include the department and application for the MySQL server.

Figure 15.35. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Server Renaming

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Server Renaming
Note

Renaming a server using the Manage Servers tab overrides all other settings, including changes made within the agent configuration.

15.5.3.2. Grouping Servers

All monitored servers are automatically included in the top level server grouping, All Servers. Other server groupings are replication groups or user-defined groups.

You can create a user-defined group by clicking the Manage Servers link. Add a group name and then click the create group button. The new group will be displayed immediately.

Replication groups are automatically discovered by MySQL Enterprise Monitor and in this respect differ from user-defined groups. For more information about replication groups see Section 15.11, “The Replication Page”. However, like user-defined groups you can edit the name of a replication group and add other servers to it.

To add to a group, select the add to group link. Choose the server or servers you wish to add and then complete the operation by choosing the add to group button. You can add a server to a group even if the agent is down.

To remove a server from a group expand the server group tree and click the remove from group link. To delete a server altogether see Section 15.5.3.3, “Removing a Server From the Dashboard”.

Note

Slaves removed from a replication group will be rediscovered and re-added to that group.

To delete an group, you can use the Delete Group link. This will delete the group and remove the servers from being part of the deleted group.

Warning

You cannot delete automatically created groups, such as those built during replication discovery, unless the group is empty. If the group is not empty, you will get a error.

There are three ways to modify an existing group; by renaming it, adding to it, or removing it. Select the rename link to change the name of a group and add to group to add servers. Deleting a group simply requires clicking the remove all from group link. This removes the server group but has no effect on individual servers.

15.5.3.3. Removing a Server From the Dashboard

If you no longer wish to monitor a MySQL server you can remove it from the Dashboard. There is no provision for deleting an active server from the Dashboard—to remove a server you must make it inactive by stopping the agent.

For instructions on stopping an agent see:

Once the agent is stopped you may delete the monitored server. Deleting a server simply means that it will no longer show up in the Dashboard.

Remove a server by choosing the Settings tab and then the Manage Servers link. Find the server you wish to remove and delete it by clicking the delete link within the pop-up menu. Deleting a server from the All Servers group or from any other group will remove it from the Dashboard entirely.

Note

A delete link will not be available for an active server. You must stop the agent before this link will appear.

You may remove a server from any group at any time. Removing the last server from a group also removes that group.

15.5.4. Managing Users

The Manage Servers panel allows to create, delete and manage individual users that have access to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

Figure 15.36. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Manage Users

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Manage Users

To log in to the Dashboard a user account is required. There are three types of users with varying privileges; Administrators, Database Administrators, and Agents. The Administrator can create additional users and differs from a DBA in this respect. For this reason the Manage Users does not display if a DBA user logs in. Additionally, only administrators can change the MySQL Enterprise Credentials section or enter a product key on the Global Settings page. These sections do not appear when DBA users log in. For more information on this subject see Section 15.5.1, “Global Settings”. The Agent account simply allows the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent to communicate with the Dashboard. There is no need for more than one agent account but defining an account for each server that is monitored can be an advantage since this minimizes exposure should any one agent be compromised. You cannot log in to the Dashboard using the agent's credentials.

When the Dashboard is first launched there are two default users, Administrator and Agent, both created during installation. Their default user names are respectively, admin and agent. The Administrator defined during installation as having the root role is unique; this user cannot be deleted.

If you are logged in as an Administrator, you can add a new user by choosing the Manage Users link from the Settings page. To create a user click the create user button, select a role for the user, and enter a user name and password.

When a new user first logs in, a dialog box opens requesting time zone and locale information. This information may be changed later from the User Preferences page. For more information, see Section 15.5.2, “User Preferences”.

If you installed the Advisors through the Dashboard you should have already configured the settings for the root role user. (See Section 15.5.1, “Global Settings” and following for more information about this topic.)

Warning

To receive MySQL Enterprise and Advisor updates configure the MySQL Enterprise settings for at least one user. The MySQL Enterprise settings were set up on the first login to the Dashboard. For information on changing these settings see, Section 15.5.1, “Global Settings”.

To edit an existing user's information, select the Manage Users link, then select the user you wish to edit. Make your desired changes in the fields provided and then save your changes.

To delete an existing user, merely select the delete link.

15.5.5. Manage Notification Groups

The Manage Notification Groups panels allows you to create and manage the notification groups used when different notifications and warnings are distributed.

Figure 15.37. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Manage Notification Groups

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Manage Notification
          Groups

Notification groups are collections of users who should be notified when advisor alerts occur. These users may have login credentials for the Dashboard but this is not a requirement.

You can create a group by clicking the create group link. Specify a group name and add recipients. When adding a user an email address must be specified. If you are adding multiple users separate them with commas.

To modify an existing notification group, select the edit link next to the group name. Deleting a group simply requires clicking the delete link.

Figure 15.38. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Edit Notification Groups

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Edit Notification
          Groups

If a rule triggers an alarm, an email will be sent to the members of the notification group specified when the rule was scheduled. For more information about scheduling rules see Section 15.7.2, “Scheduling Rules”.

To use this group for notification using the SMS interface, select the checkbox next to SMS. This will force the messages to be encoded suitable for sending using SMS. Messages will be sent using the configured SMS service.

You can also optionally select a notification group to be used when sending critical error messages (such as MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent or MySQL Enterprise Service Manager failures) by selecting the checkbox next to MEM Admin.

Note

You should ensure that there is a mail server available for sending out alerts and that there is an account configured for receiving any alerts that are created. For SMS messages, you must ensure that you have configured your SMS service settings.

15.5.6. Logs

Use the Logs link to inspect the various log files associated with the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. The following image is an example of this screen.

Figure 15.39. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Logs

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Logs

The various categories of logs are shown in alphabetic order. The most recent changes to each log are shown in the Last Modified column. The number of entries in any specific log is shown under the Entries column.

To view detailed information click the Log Name. This will open a separate browser window showing the date, time, alert type, and accompanying message.

On this screen you can filter log information in a couple of ways; by the message type and by time period .

To filter by message type select from the options in the level drop-down box. These are, in order of decreasing severity:

  • All

  • Error

  • Warning

  • Information

  • Trace

  • Debug

You can also adjust the number of items that appear on each page.

Press the clear all logs link to remove all log entries. To remove entries of a specific kind click the clear logs link associated with the specific log you would like to remove. A confirmation dialog box allows you to back out of this operation and avoid accidentally removing log information.

To clear log files of a specific age see the Data Purge Behavior section of the Global Preferences page. For more information on this topic see Data Purge Behavior.

Use the edit log level link to change the type of error logged. The value selected from the Edit Log Level dialog box determines what appears under the Threshold column (second from the left in Data Purge Behavior).

Selecting Error from the list box will create the least number of log entries and Debug the most. Choosing None turns off logging altogether.

It is also possible to download a compressed version of all the log files. For more information, see Section 15.5.7, “The Product Information Screen”.

15.5.7. The Product Information Screen

Use the Product Information link to view detailed information about your subscription level and contract status.

  • Subscription Warnings

    The Subscription Warnings section contains information unique to your subscription. Information provided here will relate to your subscription settings and the servers currently being monitored. For more information, see Section 15.5.7.1, “Subscription Warning”.

  • Contract Status

    The Contract Status section displays the subscription level, expiration date, contract number, the number of servers supported, and your MySQL Enterprise user name. The Subscription Level section gives more detailed information, including features and any restrictions that may apply. You may update your subscription at any time by clicking the update button.

  • Subscription Information

    The Subscription Information section contains detailed information about your subscription level and the numbger of hosts currently monitored within your subscription level.

  • Enterprise Dashboard Server Info

    The Enterprise Dashboard Server Info section provides detailed information about the running of your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, including information about the Java environment, hostname and version information.

    The section also includes detailed information about the current status of your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, showing information on the agents, rules, and outstanding status of the various components. The information provded in this section is listed below:

    • Pending Heartbeats

    • Processed Heartbeats

    • Pending Jobs

    • Number of Agents

    • Monitored mysqld Instances

    • Build Version

    • Advisor Version

    • Number of Rules

    • Number of Graphs

    • Last Successful Email

    • Last Email Failure

    • Last Failure Message

    You can monitor the status of the email messages sent by MySQL Enterprise Service Manager by looking at the values of the Last Successful Email and Last Email Failure sections. Any failure by MySQL Enterprise Service Manager to send an email will be reported, with the failure date recorded in Last Email Failure. You can examine the Last Failure Message field to determine the precise reason for the failure.

  • Readme

    The Readme section contains a copy of the text Readme file provided with each release, and provides release specific information about your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation.

  • Diagnostic Report

    The page includes a hyperlink, Download diagnostic report. Click this link to download a compressed version of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager log files. All the log files found on the Logs page (for more information about logs see Section 15.5.6, “Logs”) are contained in this file. It also contains the Java properties file, the monitored MySQL servers property file, information about the status of the JDBC connection and Java threads, and the subscription.xml file. This report is especially useful for debugging the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent.

15.5.7.1. Subscription Warning

The Subscriptions Warning section on the product information page displays any warnings relative to your subscription. For example, if your subscription has expired you may receive a message such as the following:

Your Subscription Needs to be Updated
* Your Platinum subscription expired 3 days ago on Feb 14, 2008 11:59:59 PM.
If the subscription information on this page is not current, you can
update it by going to the Enterprise Monitor Global Settings page and
providing MySQL Enterprise credentials or by importing a new product
key that you downloaded from http://www.mysql.com/enterprise/download.php.
To update or renew your subscription, please contact your MySQL
Account Representative at [email protected] or visit
http://www.mysql.com/about/contact/renew.html.  After the update or
renewal is complete you can then follow the above instructions for
updating your subscription.

Follow these instructions to update your subscription. If you see this message and your subscription has already been updated, simply click the update button in the Contract Status section of this page. This should update your subscription and remove the warning.

Note

After updating your subscription remember to also update your advisors. For instructions on doing this see Section 15.7.1, “Installing and Updating Advisors”.

15.6. The What's New Page

The What's New Page provides a simplified interface for providing updates and news related to your MySQL Enterprise Subscription. By default, the information is automatically updated every hour. To disable the updates, or force an update, see Section 15.6.1, “Setting What's New Configuration”.

Figure 15.40. The What's New Tab

The What's New Tab

The What's New page is divided into three main sections:

  • The area on the left-hand side of the page is used to provide information about the major new features and functionality in MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

  • Open Support Issues provides a quick interface to the list of currently open issues with MySQL Support as identified through the MySQL Enterprise and Support websites. Issues that are currently marked in the system as Waiting On Customer are also added to the main MySQL Enterprise Dashboard above the Heat Chart.

    To use the Open Support Issues functionality, you must have set your MySQL Enterprise credentials within MySQL Enterprise Dashboard. For more information, see Section 15.5.1, “Global Settings”.

  • Important Product Release Announcements provides a list of news items from the news feed provided on the MySQL Enterprise website. The news feed will contain important information, including, but not limited to:

    • New releases of MySQL Products, including MySQL Server and MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

    • End-of-life and support changes.

    • Urgent errors and notifications.

    When items are new (unread), they will be indicated with a star icon. Unread items on the What's New page will also be notified with a number in the tab title within the main Dashboard. Items are automatically marked as read when you visit the What's New page.

    The announcements information is made available in two ways, using either a connection to the MySQL Enterprise website, when the information will be updated at a set interval, or through information included with the MySQL Enterprise Advisor bundles.

    Note

    To use poll the MySQL Enterprise site directly your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager must have access to the MySQL Enterprise website. If your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is not directly connected to the Internet, you can set an HTTP Proxy to be used to access the information. For more information on configuring an HTTP Proxy, see Section 15.5.1, “Global Settings”.

Note

You can disable the display of your open Support issues and product notifications by using the Configure What's New link on the What's New page. For more information, see Section 15.6.1, “Setting What's New Configuration”.

15.6.1. Setting What's New Configuration

You can configure the operation and forcibly update the information on the What's New page by clicking the configure what's new button at the top-right of the What's New page.

Figure 15.41. What's New Configuration

What's New Configuration

The configurable options are:

  • Automatically check for New Announcements?

    To disable the New Announcements updates, deselect the checkbox. Updates are enabled by default.

    The last time an update of the New Announcements information was successfully executed is displayed below the title.

    You can force an update of the New Announcements information by selecting the yes radio button next to Force check now?. A check will be executed when you click the save button to close the configuration dialog.

  • Automatically check to Support Issues?

    To disable the Support Issues updates, deselect the checkbox. Updates are enabled by default.

    The last time an update of the Support Issues information was successfully executed is displayed below the title.

    You can force an update of the Support Issues information by selecting the yes radio button next to Force check now?. A check will be executed when you click the save button to close the configuration dialog.

  • Automatically check for Advisor and Product Key Updates?

    The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager can automatically look for changes to your MySQL Enterprise Advisor and product key information by polling the MySQL Enterprise website.

    To disable the Advisor and Product key updates, deselect the checkbox. Updates are enabled by default.

    You can force a check for updates to the Advisor and Product key information by selecting the yes radio button next to Force check now?. A check will be executed when you click the save button to close the configuration dialog.

Click save to save your settings. If you selected any system to force an update, the update will take place in the background. To cancel your changes, click cancel.

15.7. The Advisors Page

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

MySQL Enterprise Advisors are a series of scripts that gather information from your MySQL servers using the Service Manager and the Monitor Agents, analyze that information based on custom rules developed by MySQL AB, and then offer alerts and advice when necessary. As new rules are introduced, the MySQL Enterprise Advisors can be updated through the MySQL Enterprise website.

The MySQL Enterprise Advisors fall into the following categories:

  • Administration

    • Better manage databases

    • Suggest improvements for smoother operation

  • Heat Chart

    • Drive the status indicators in the Heat Chart

    • Identify up/down status and performance issues

  • Performance

    • Identify potential performance bottlenecks

    • Make suggestions for improved database speed

  • Replication

    • Identify replication bottlenecks

    • Improve replication design

  • Schema

    • Identify schema changes

    • Find security loopholes

  • Security

    • Protect MySQL servers

    • Find security loopholes

An advisor category provides a set of rules designed to enforce MySQL best practices for that specific category. Rules can be targeted to run at the individual server or group level and, upon rule violation, provide alerts and expert advice on how to address and correct a problem before it becomes a costly outage.

Individual rules are defined in the items-mysql-monitor.xml file. On Windows this file is found in the C:\Program Files\mySQL\Enterprise\Agent\share\mysql-monitor-agent directory and on Unix in the /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/share/mysql-monitor-agent directory. Find below the rule for discovering a root account with no password.

<ITEM>
  <NAME>no_root_password</NAME>
  <FIELD>no_password</FIELD>
  <SCOPE>table</SCOPE>
  <CODE>
    <![CDATA[SELECT COUNT(*) AS no_password FROM mysql.user WHERE user='root' AND password='']]>
  </CODE>
  <NAMESPACE>mysql</NAMESPACE>
  <RETURNS>INTEGER</RETURNS>
  <SOURCE>table</SOURCE>
  <INSTANCE>mysql.user</INSTANCE>
</ITEM>

Your MySQL Enterprise subscription level determines which rules are available to you. Subscription levels are cumulative, meaning that higher MySQL Enterprise levels have access to all the rules of the lower levels.

When the Dashboard is first installed, the only rules that are scheduled are those that belong to the Heat Chart group.

Go to the Advisors screen by logging in to the Dashboard and choosing the Advisors tab.

15.7.1. Installing and Updating Advisors

Instructions for installing Advisors are given in Section 15.3.2.7.3, “Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in”, and following. Principally, you need to configure your MySQL Enterprise login or enter your product key before you can update your Advisors.

If your MySQL Enterprise login is configured, you can download the latest Advisors by navigating to the Advisors page and finding the Check for Updates link. You can periodically update advisors in this way.

Note

If you do not have Internet access and cannot use the online update option you can manually import advisors. This process is described in Section 15.3.2.7.3, “Installing Advisors After Initial Log-in”.

15.7.2. Scheduling Rules

Once the MySQL Enterprise Advisors have been installed, you can configure which advisors you would like to run on a scheduled basis.

You can schedule rules by individual server or by group. This is done by first selecting the desired server or server group from the Server tree found on the left side of the screen. Next select the Advisors tab.

Opening the Advisors tab takes you to the Current Schedule page. If you have only just installed the MySQL Enterprise Monitor then you will only see the Heat Chart group of advisors. Clicking the + button will show all the rules in the Heat Chart group.

Clicking the + button beside any specific rule will show the servers that this rule is running on, its frequency, and its status. Initially, all the Heat Chart rules are enabled.

For a more complete description of a rule, click the rule's name. This opens a dialog box that gives detailed information about the rule.

To view the advisors other than the Heat Chart group, select the Add to Schedule link. This will show all the advisors available for your subscription level.

Rules are grouped by functionality and displayed in alphabetic order. To expand a group click the + button to the left of the advisor name.

You may activate all the rules in a group by selecting the checkbox beside the group name. Once selected you may apply rules against a specific server or a group of servers. A message showing the group of servers or the specific server you have selected will display immediately below the schedule button. For example, if the All Servers group is selected in the server tree, then the message will read, “Schedule Advisors Against All Servers”.

To select a specific rule, expand the group tree by clicking the + button. Select the checkbox to the left of the rule you wish to schedule. Click schedule to display the following dialog box:

Figure 15.42. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Scheduling Dialog

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Scheduling Dialog

The Schedule dialog box allows you to configure the following fields:

  • Frequency: Dictates how often the rule will run. The default value for different rules varies but a rule can be set to run at any interval desired.

    Warning

    Setting the frequency of a rule involves tradeoffs. Rule evaluation consumes system resources—CPU, memory, and disk space. While the amount consumed is small, if you run all the rules against dozens of servers on a very frequent basis, you may put a significant load on the Service Manager. So select an appropriate frequency. For example, unless you are stopping and restarting your servers frequently, rules that check server configuration variables probably don't need to run very often.

    Another consideration is that certain status variables increase monotonically until a server is restarted. Examples of these are Key_reads, Qcache_hits, Questions, Table_locks_waited, and similar variables. The value returned by SHOW STATUS for these variables is the value since the server was started (or since the last FLUSH STATUS command), which is not very useful for performance tuning, especially if the server has been running for an extended period of time. For performance tuning it is much better to know the change in state (for example, delta) of these values over the last 10 minutes, 1 hour, or whatever time frame is appropriate for your application. The frequency at which you schedule a rule is the time frame used to calculate the delta values of these variables, and it is the delta that is used in expression evaluation, not the absolute value. Consequently, select a frequency that is appropriate for the metrics being used in the expression.

  • Notifications: A listbox of users, notification groups, or both who will be emailed when an advisor reaches an alert level. Single or multiple selections are allowed. For instructions on setting up notification groups see, Section 15.5.5, “Manage Notification Groups”.

Set the frequency, identify whomever you wish to notify, and click schedule to schedule the advisor. Upon completion, you should see the message, Successfully scheduled.

If you haven't set up global SNMP traps and would like your Network Management System (NMS) to handle events related to a specific rule then check the Use SNMP Traps checkbox. For more information about Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) see Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Traps.

Scheduling rules using the checkbox and the schedule button is an effective way to schedule multiple rules. To schedule a single rule you may also use the schedule link.

When scheduling more than one rule, you have the option of selecting a checkbox to use the default frequency of each rule or you may choose a frequency that will apply to all selected rules. When customizing the frequency, take care that you choose a value that is appropriate to all the rules selected.

Note

If the agent does not have the SUPER privilege and InnoDB-related rules are scheduled, a warning will appear in the DataCollection log. This also occurs if mysqld is started with the skip-innodb option. For more information about agent rights see Section 15.3.3.1, “Creating a MySQL User Account for the Monitor Agent”.

15.7.2.1. Heat Chart Notifications

It is particularly important that Notifications be set for the Heat Chart group of rules. This is easily done from the Current Schedule page by clicking the + button beside a rule and then clicking a server.

Doing this opens a window with three tabs—Overview, Settings, and Advanced.

The Overview tab shows which advisor group a rule belongs to, a description of its purpose, and a link to the history of this alert.

In the Settings tab you can adjust the frequency of this rule and also specify a notification group. To select more than one contiguous group press the Shift key and click the desired groups. (Some web browsers may require that you drag your selection.) Noncontiguous selections are made by holding down the Control key and clicking the desired groups.

If you haven't set up global SNMP traps and would like your Network Management System (NMS) to handle events related to a specific rule then check the Use SNMP Traps checkbox. For more information about Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) see Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Traps.

The Advanced tab gives detailed information about how this rule is implemented.

15.7.3. Editing Built-in Rules

The frequency and thresholds defined for a rule are default recommendations. To edit these properties choose the Create/Edit Rule link.

The following image shows the screen used to edit rules:

Figure 15.43. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Editing Rules

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Edit Rules

Beside the rule name is the Advisor drop-down list box, used for setting the advisor group. This list box shows existing groupings and any you may have added. The Expression textarea shows the advisor rule, Variable Assignment the data item associated with variable(s) used in the rule and Thresholds determines when to trigger each alert type.

The three levels of Thresholds are Info Alert, Warning Alert, and Critical Alert indicating increasing levels of severity. Levels can be triggered by the expression result being equal to a certain value, greater than a certain value, or less than a certain value.

The data items that variables are associated with are operating system (OS) properties such as available RAM or MySQL characteristics such as the InnoDB buffer pool. To see all available data items drop down the Data Item list box. For a listing of these data items see Data Collection Items.

In Figure 15.43, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Editing Rules” the drop-down Data Item list box within the Variable Assignment frame shows the various MySQL server status or operating system specific variables that may be used in expressions. The text boxes below Thresholds define the levels at which informational, warning, or critical alerts are issued.

To lower the threshold for an informational alert, simply increase the number given in the Info Alert text box.

When a data item can apply to multiple objects, you need to specify which instance to use for that item, hence the Instance text box. In almost all cases this should be set to local. The exceptions are as follows:

  • For CPU-related items set Instance to cpu0. Additional CPUs on a system are referred to as cpu1, cpu2 and so on.

  • There can be multiple disks mounted on a system. To refer to a specific drive set Instance to the name of of the mounted drive. On Windows this would be C:, D:, and so on. On Unix systems, use whatever is valid for the df command.

  • For RAM-related items set Instance to mem.

  • Where there are table-specific variables, the database name and table name must be specified in the Instance text box. This topic is discussed in detail in what follows.

Note

It is not possible to have a data item that is unrelated to an instance. This raises the error, You must map "<variable>" to an instance, and you will be unable to save the rule.

An agent can only collect data from one MySQL server, so the instance entry for a variable in a rule does not need to specify which MySQL server to use; no matter how many servers are being monitored there is always a one-to-one relationship between an agent and its monitored server.

However, on one server there may be multiple occurrences of a variable. For example, there are multiple possible occurrences of table-specific variables such as Avg_row_length because there can be multiple databases and tables defined in a MySQL server. In this case, the “instance” refers to the database and table that a data item should be associated with, specified in the form databasename.tablename. So, for example, if you want to reference the Avg_row_length of the mysql database user table in an expression, select the mysql:tablestatus:Avg_row_length from the Data Item list box and specify mysql.user in the Instance text box.

On the other hand, in the case of a global server variable, there is only one possible target. For example, there can only be one instance of delay_key_write because this variable is global and applies to the server as a whole. In this case specify local in the Instance text box.

To save your changes click the save button at the bottom of the page.

Note

You can change only the thresholds and the frequency of built-in rules. So that rules function properly when updated, other changes are prohibited.

Should you wish to make other changes to a built-in rule, copy it and modify it as desired.

You can edit a rule even if it is currently scheduled. Your changes will not be overwritten when new rules are imported using the Check for Updates link.

15.7.4. Creating Advisors and Rules

In addition to using and editing the advisors and rules provided by MySQL Enterprise, users can create their own advisors and rules to meet their own unique needs. To do this go to the Advisors page and choose the Create/Edit Rule link.

15.7.4.1. Creating Advisors

Similar existing rules are grouped together in advisor groups.

The built-in advisors are:

  • Administration

  • Heat Chart

  • Performance

  • Replication

  • Schema

  • Security

The ability to create your own advisor group allows you to create groupings suitable to your circumstances.

You can create your own grouping by simply clicking the create advisor button. Enter an appropriate name and click the add button. The newly created group will appear in the Advisor column.

The newly created advisor is added to the list box of advisors shown in Figure 15.43, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Editing Rules”. You can now use this category of advisors when you create a new rule.

15.7.4.2. Overview of Rule Creation

Rules are created using the same screen seen in Figure 15.43, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Editing Rules”. To begin creating a rule from scratch, click the create rule button. However, the simplest way to create a new rule is to copy an existing one. Unlike editing an existing rule, when you copy a rule, every element of that rule is editable.

You can change the rule name, the advisor group that a rule belongs to and you can set your own version number. In Figure 15.43, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Editing Rules”, you have already seen how the threshold and frequency of a rule may be altered.

Most importantly you can alter a rule's expression. Expressions are the core of a MySQL Enterprise Advisor and are used to define the scenario being monitored. An expression can be as simple as a single server parameter or can be quite complex, combining multiple parameters with various mathematical operations.

An expression has two main characteristics:

  • An expression defines a situation where a best practice is not being followed

  • The result of an expression must always be 1 or 0 (that is, true or false)

If an expression evaluates to true for a specific server, an alarm is raised, indicating that a best practice is not being followed. If an expression evaluates to false no alarm is raised because the best practice is indeed being followed.

For example, if having binary logging enabled is considered a best practice for a production server (which we believe it is), then this best practice is being violated if log_bin is OFF. Consequently, the expression for the “Binary Logging Not Enabled” rule is “%log_bin% == OFF”. If this evaluates to 1, an alarm is raised because the best practice is not being followed.

An expression is made up of one or more variables and zero or more mathematical operators. The MySQL Enterprise Monitor uses the MySQL database server's expression parser and evaluator For a complete list of operators and functions see Chapter 11, Functions and Operators. For a complete list of the built-in variables used when creating rules see Section 5.1.1, “Server Option and Variable Reference”.

Creating an expression is dependent on variables defined in the Variable Assignment frame. This frame links variables used in the expression field with data gathered from the target MySQL server instance—server status variables, operating system status information, and table information. Variable names are associated with elements in the Data Item drop-down list. If you need to define more than one variable simply click the add row button. For a complete listing of the data collection items used in creating rules see Data Collection Items.

The remaining fields determine the information that displays in a notification email or the informational pop-up window associated with each advisor.

Note

When saving a new rule ensure that you do not duplicate the name of an existing rule.

15.7.4.3. Variables

When an expression is evaluated variables get replaced by values. For example, part of the expression for the “MyISAM Key Cache Has Sub-Optimal Hit Rate” rule calculates the hit rate as follows:

100-((%Key_reads% / %Key_read_requests%)*100)

If the current value of %Key_reads% is 4522 and the current value of %Key_read_requests% is 125989, the hit ratio assesses to 96.4%:

100 -((4522 / 125989) * 100)

By convention, the Advisors supplied by MySQL use ‘%’ as the delimiter, for example, %Key_reads%. This makes variables more readily identifiable.

In addition to being used in an expression, variables may also be used in the Description, Advice, Action, and Links attributes of a rule. This allows you to report the current value of an expression.

For instance, you can add the message, “The current value of Key_reads is %Key_reads%.” to the Advice text box. When this is displayed on the screen, the value of %Key_reads% is substituted into the text. Supposing %Key_reads% has a value of 4522, the message becomes “The current value of Key_reads is 4522.

15.7.4.4. Thresholds

Each expression has a threshold value that triggers an alert. The THRESHOLD keyword is used to associate that value with an alert level—either an Info, Warning, or Critical alert.

For example, the expression for the performance advisor, “Thread Cache Size May Not Be Optimal”, is:

100-((%Threads_created% / %Connections%) * 100) < THRESHOLD

The THRESHOLD is set at 95% for an Info level alert, 85% for a Warning alert, and 75% for a Critical alert; producing alerts of three different levels.

Expressions can be quite simple. The expression for “Binary Logging Not Enabled” (one of the Administration alerts) is:

%log_bin% == THRESHOLD

When the result is OFF, only one alert is triggered—a Warning level alert. In this situation you might think we could just use the expression %log_bin% == "OFF". However, doing this would not test binary logging against a threshold so would not result in an alert.

When you create an expression, think carefully about the conditions under which it should be evaluated and the conditions under which it should not. For example, the expression for the “MyISAM Key Cache Has Sub-Optimal Hit Rate” rule is:

(%Uptime% > 10800) && (%Key_read_requests% > 10000) »
 && (100-((%Key_reads% / %Key_read_requests%) * 100) < THRESHOLD)

The essence of the rule is really: (100-((%Key_reads% / %Key_read_requests% ) * 100) < THRESHOLD). However, when a server is first starting up, it may take a while to reach a state that is representative of normal operations. For example, the key cache and the query cache may need some period of time before they have cached typical application data as opposed to start-up and initialization data. In this case, the first part of the expression, (%Uptime% > 10800), holds off evaluating this expression until the system has been running for 10800 seconds (3 hours).

In addition, if some part of the system is not heavily used an alert may be triggered based on limited data. For example, if your application does not use the MyISAM storage engine, the “MyISAM Key Cache Has Sub-Optimal Hit Rate” rule may be triggered based on very limited use of other MyISAM tables such as the mysql.user table. For this reason, this advisor has a second part— (%Key_read_requests% > 10000)—meaning the rule won't be evaluated unless there is plenty of activity associated with the key cache.

In other circumstances, there may be periods of time during which you don't want a rule to be evaluated—a blackout period. For example, the expression for the “Slave Too Far Behind Master” rule is: %Seconds_Behind_Master% > THRESHOLD. However, suppose you run a backup process between 6 and 7 pm on a replication slave, and it's normal for that slave to get behind the master by an amount more than the THRESHOLD during that time. In that case you don't want to receive an alert because the rule violation is expected. You can achieve this by adding the following to the expression: && CURTIME() NOT BETWEEN '18:00:00' AND '19:00:00' In essence, this means “don't trigger an alert between 18:00:00 and 19:00:00 (6 pm and 7 pm)”.

15.7.4.5. Using Strings

String values may appear in the Expression or the Thresholds text boxes. In both cases, they must be enclosed within quotation marks. For example, the expression for the “Slave I/O Thread Not Running” rule is:

(%Slave_running% == "ON") && (%Slave_IO_Running% != THRESHOLD)

In similar fashion the Critical Alerts threshold text box is set to a value of "Yes".

When the expression is evaluated, either "OFF" or "ON" will be substituted for %Slave_running%, and "Yes" or "No" for %Slave_IO_Running%, depending on the state of your system. If the slave is running but the I/O thread is not, the expression then becomes:

("ON" == "ON") && ("No" != "Yes")

Without quotation marks this expression would not evaluate to TRUE as it should.

Note

So that it is interpreted properly, the == operator is converted to = before being passed to the MySQL expression parser.

15.7.4.6. Wiki Format

When editing or defining a rule, the text entered in the Problem Description, Advice, Recommended Action, and Links and Further Reading text boxes may be formatted in Wiki format. This allows you to format text and add hyperlinks when creating or editing your own rules.

Find a brief introduction to using Wiki formatting in the following table.

Table 15.1. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Wiki Formatting

ExampleDescription
__bold__boldface text
~~italic~~italicize text
\\create a line break
\\ \\create a double line break
\\\\Gcreate a backslash
*item 1create a bulleted list item
#item 1create a numbered list item
\_use the ‘\’ to escape special characters
{moreInfo:name|url}create a hyperlink

So the following Wiki text:

Replication is a __very nice feature__ of MySQL.  Replication can be very
useful for solving problems in the following areas:
* Data Distribution
* Load Balancing
* Backup and Recovery
You can check replication status and start a slave using the following
commands: SHOW SLAVE STATUS \\\\G\\START SLAVE;
{moreInfo:MySQL Manual: Replication
      FAQ|http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/replication-faq.html}

Would be translated into the following HTML markup:

Replication is a <b>very nice feature</b> of MySQL.  Replication can be very
useful for solving problems in the following areas:
<ul>
  <li>Data distribution</li>
  <li>Load Balancing</li>
  <li>Backup and recovery</li>
</ul>You can check replication status and start a slave with the following
commands: SHOW SLAVE STATUS \G;<br/>START SLAVE;
<a href="../mysql-monitor-common/http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/replication-faq.html"
  target="_blank" >MySQL Manual: Replication FAQ</a>

To find out more about this format go to the wikipedia.org web site.

15.7.4.7. Creating a New Rule: An Example

This section documents the steps required to create a rule. Before attempting to create a rule, please review the preceding sections of this chapter.

This example creates a rule that checks the number of rows in a table. Having 50,000 rows in this table is deemed to warrant a critical alert. Lesser numbers are assigned to informational and warning level alerts.

Begin by navigating to the Advisors tab and clicking the manage rules link. Then choose the create rule button.

Create your custom rule by following these steps:

  1. Using the Rule Name text box, give the rule an appropriate name. Something such as "Excessive number of records in table_name table", may be appropriate.

  2. From the Advisor drop down list box choose an advisor group for your rule. The Administration group of rules might be suitable but if you wish, create your own group of advisors. For instructions on doing this see Section 15.7.4.1, “Creating Advisors”.

  3. Enter the following expression in the Expression text area: '%table_name_num_rows% > THRESHOLD'. Replace table_name with the name of the table you wish to monitor. Note that the variable %table_name_num_rows% has not yet been defined.

  4. Set the Thresholds.

    1. Set the Critical Alert level to 50000.

    2. Set the Warning Alert level to 10000.

    3. Set the Info Alert level to 5000.

  5. Define your variable in the Variable Assignment frame.

    1. In the Variable text box enter '%table_name_num_rows%, the variable used in the Expression text box

    2. In the Data Item drop down list box find and select the mysql:table:numrows entry. (For a description of all the data items available see Data Collection Items.)

    3. In the Instance text box enter database_name.table_name.

  6. Add appropriate entries for the Problem Description, the Advice, and the Links text areas. If you wish, use Wiki markup for these text areas. See Section 15.7.4.6, “Wiki Format” for more information. Note that you can also reference the '%table_name_num_rows% variable in these text areas. For example, you can display the current number of rows with a message such as 'table_name currently has %table_name_num_rows% rows.'

  7. Save the rule.

Once the rule is created it needs to be scheduled against the server that contains the database table you wish to monitor. For instructions on scheduling rules see Section 15.7.2, “Scheduling Rules”.

15.7.5. Creating a Custom Data Collection Item

Section 15.7.4.7, “Creating a New Rule: An Example” shows how to create a custom rule and Data Collection Items shows the data items that can be used in rule creation. However, in some circumstances you may want to create a rule that uses a custom data collection item.

You can create additional custom data collection items by editing the share/mysql-proxy/items/custom.xml custom rule file added during installation. The custom.xml is installed automatically, but is not affected when running an upgrade installation. The rules file is listed last in the agent-item-files configuration parameter, which means that any rules and data collection items added to this file will supercede the standard data collection definitions.

Once you have made changes to the custom.xml, you must restart the agent to load the custom definitions.

15.7.5.1. Modifying the Custom Data Item XML File

As an example, this section shows how to create a data item for monitoring the amount of free InnoDB tablespace. You can have multiple items in your custom.xml file, just specify additional class entries. A sample entry is provided in the custom.xml file that is included during installation. You can replace, or add the following definition to the file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<classes>
  <class>
    <classname>innodb_min_free</classname>
    <namespace>mysql</namespace>
    <query><![CDATA[SELECT MIN(substring_index(substring_index(table_comment," ",3)," ",-1)/1024/1024)
      as Free FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE engine = 'InnoDB']]></query>
  </class>
</classes>

After saving the file, ensure that the agent-item-files parameter within the configuration includes the custom.xml file. For example:

[mysql-proxy]
 ...
agent-item-files = share/mysql-proxy/items/quan.lua,share/mysql-proxy/items/items-mysql-monitor.xml,»
      share/mysql-proxy/items/agent-allocation-stats.lua,share/mysql-proxy/items/custom.xml
 ...

For this change to take effect you must restart the agent. To do this see:

Once the agent has restarted, you will find the new data item in the Data Item drop down list box on the Rule Definition page. Its fully qualified name is mysql:table:innodb_min_free.

15.7.6. Disabling and Unscheduling Rules

In some circumstances you may no longer wish to apply a rule against a specific server or group of servers and in other circumstances you may want to suspend a rule for a short length of time. With this in mind, it is possible to disable or unschedule a rule.

To disable or unschedule an advisor choose the Current Schedule screen of the Advisors tab.

Rules may be disabled or unscheduled using the buttons on the upper or lower left of the screen. You may also change a rule by clicking the enabled or unschedule hyperlink to the right of a rule. The buttons are particularly useful when you are altering more than one rule.

To no longer run a rule against a specific server, expand the advisor group and the specific rule by clicking the + button. You may then click the unschedule button. When the dialog window opens, choose the unschedule button and that rule will no longer be applied. If you wish to back out of the operation choose cancel. If, at a later date, you wish to institute this rule again, you may do so from the Add to Schedule page.

If you want to suspend a rule temporarily, use the disable button and follow the same process you would for unscheduling. Once a rule is disabled the link under the status column changes to red and reads disabled. When a rule is disabled, data is no longer collected for that rule. A disabled rule is easily re-enabled by clicking the disabled link or by using the enable button.

Multiple rules may be altered for one or more servers by selecting the appropriate checkbox and then clicking the unschedule, enable, or disable button.

Note

Rules associated with the heat chart cannot be disabled or unscheduled as they are required by MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

15.7.7. Advisor Blackout Periods

Database servers require regular maintenance and during these periods you may wish to stop Monitor Agents from reporting their findings. During a blackout period rules are not evaluated and notifications are put on hold but Monitor Agents continue to collect data . In this respect blacked-out rules differ from disabled rules; data continues to be collected and stored in the repository.

Blackout periods are enabled by entering the following URL into the address bar of your browser, substituting the appropriate host name, port and server name:

http://localhost:18080/rest?command=blackout »
 &server_name=SuSE:3306&blackout_state=true

If you are unsure of the host name and port to use, check the configuration_report.txt file. Be sure to specify the correct port for the Tomcat server. Specify the server you wish to blackout using the name that appears in the Server Tree, being sure to include a colon and port number as shown in the preceding example.

An HTTP authentication dialog box requesting your Dashboard user name and password will open. Specify the administrator's credentials. The default user name is admin; use the password you specified when you initially logged in to the Dashboard.

You can also blackout a server group by entering the following URL into the address bar of your browser, substituting the appropriate host name, and server group name:

http://localhost:18080/rest?command=blackout »
 &group_name=Finance&blackout_state=true
    

When the HTTP authentication dialog box opens, enter the administrator's credentials.

You can confirm that a server is blacked out by looking at the server name in the Dashboard; the name of a blacked out server is greyed.

To reactivate the blacked-out server or server group, use the appropriate URL and query string, changing the blackout_state=true name/value pair to blackout_state=false. Again, this must be done by a user with administrative privileges.

Note

Restarting MySQL Enterprise Monitor will not reactivate a blacked out server.

15.7.7.1. Scripting Blackouts

Rather than opening your web browser and blacking out a server by typing entries into the address bar, you can write a script to achieve the same effect. This section documents a sample blackout script that can be run from the command line.

Create the following file and save it as blackout.pl.

  #!/usr/bin/perl
  use LWP 5.64;
  # USAGE: blackout.pl servicemanager:18080 admin password servername:3306 true
  # $ARGV[0] = management server hostname:port
  # $ARGV[1] = management server username
  # $ARGV[2] = management server password
  # $ARGV[3] = mysqld managed instance server name and port
  # $ARGV[4] = blackout state (true/false)
  my $browser = LWP::UserAgent->new;
  $browser->credentials(
    $ARGV[0],
    '',
    $ARGV[1],
    $ARGV[2]
  );
  my $url = URI->new('http://'.$ARGV[0].'/rest');
  $url->query_form( # And here the form data pairs:
    'command' => 'blackout',
    'server_name' => $ARGV[3],
    'blackout_state' => $ARGV[4]
  );
  my $response = $browser->post( $url );
  if (!$response->is_success) {
    die $response->status_line . "\n";
  }
Note

Windows users can omit the shebang line.

On Unix systems use the chmod +x blackout.pl command to make the file executable.

At the command line enter blackout.pl servicemanager:18080 admin password servername:3306 true.

If you are unsure of the host name and port to use, check the configuration_report.txt file. Be sure to specify the correct port for the Tomcat server. Specify the server you wish to blackout using the name that appears in the Server Tree, being sure to include a colon and port number as shown in the preceding example. Make sure that the user you specify is a "manager". Specifying a user with "dba" rights only will not black out a server and no error will be displayed.

You can confirm that a server is blacked out by looking at the server name in the Dashboard; the name of a blacked out server is greyed. To end the blackout, run the same script, changing the final argument to false.

Note

Restarting MySQL Enterprise Monitor will not reactivate a blacked out server.

15.8. The Events Page

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

Once an advisor has been scheduled, it will run at set intervals. If it finds nothing of interest no alerts or emails will be created.

Events are defined using a number of different levels according to the severity of the alert. The seven levels are

  • Failure: Indicates a failure for the given rule or event. Usually this indicates that the rule on which the event is based has failed, probably due to a typo or other error. Occasionally it can indicate a failure to retrieve the required information for a given rule.

  • Critical: The event is critical and requires immediate attention. Critical events normally indicate that a serious problem has, or is about, to occur. You should examine the event and determine the cause and fix it as soon as possible.

  • Warning: The event is a warning of something that you should be aware of, but which is not affecting the operation of your server.

  • Info: The event is for informational purposes. Info events are used to indicate issues that do not affect the operation of your server, but which may highlight a minor configuration or other issue.

  • Success: The rule has executed successfully with no issues. This is used to indicate that the result of the rule is OK and is used to indicate when an event that was previously in a Critical or Failure state has returned to normal.

  • Unknown: Indicates when the current state of the event/rule is currently unknown. This state can be issued when the current status of the event cannot be determined.

  • Closed: The issue has been corrected and marked closed.

For convenience, the event states are also represented by icons, as defined in the table below. The table also shows the relative level of the alert from the highest (Critical) to the lowest (unknown). The order represented here is used when identifying when an event has transitioned between levels (for example, from Success to Critical), hence triggering a notification, and when sorting events based on their current state.

IconDescription
An octagonal red icon indicates a critical alert.
A triangular yellow icon a warning.
A conversation bubble an informational alert.
A green tick beside an event indicates that the rule has run successfully and no alert created.
A question mark icon indicates that the status of the rule is unknown.

When alerts are triggered, they appear on the Events screen. Alerts also appear on the Monitor screen in order of severity. The notification group or groups associated with a specific rule receive email notification when an alert is triggered. For more information about creating notification groups see Section 15.5.5, “Manage Notification Groups”.

To view open events, click the Events tab. The tree-view on the left determines which server or server group these events belong to. Open events are shown in tabular format.

Figure 15.44. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Events Screen

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Events screen

The event table has the following columns:

  • Current: An icon indicating the current severity of the alert

  • Worst: An icon indicating the worst severity recorded for this alert

  • Server: The name of the server the alert applies to

  • Advisor: The category of the advisor

  • Rule: A short description of the rule that has been violated

  • Time: The approximate time the event occurred

  • Status: The status of the event

  • Unnamed Column: Provides a link to the Close dialog box

By default, all events are shown but the list of events can be filtered using the form displayed above the event list. The options include filtering by:

  • Severity

  • Date (using a range with From/To)

  • Advisor group

  • Specific rule

  • Status

Choose the options you are interested in and click the filter button to refresh the display. You may limit the number of items that appear on a page by choosing a different value from the Limit drop down listbox.

The drop down list box showing severity has the options: All, Alerts, Critical, Warning, Info, Success, and Unknown. Selecting the option All shows all alerts and also those rules that have run successfully.

A successful rule is one that has not been violated and is indicated by a green tick icon.

The Alerts shows only those rules that have been violated.

Columns can be sorted by clicking the individual column headings. The alerts shown in Figure 15.44, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Events Screen”.

The server shown in Figure 15.44, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Events Screen”, is filtered for All. Typically, when filtering by severity you would choose Alerts and, if you see a Critical, Warning, or Info alert, use the All filter to see when the rule last ran successfully. This may assist in determining the cause of the alert.

Besides filtering for severity, you can also choose to filter for a specific time period using the From and To text boxes. You also have the choice of filtering by specific rules or categories of rules. The Status drop-down list box let's you choose All, Open, or Closed events. To avoid excessive scrolling, you can also limit the number of events that show on a specific page.

For more information about an alert, click the rule name. A pop-up window will appear showing a description of the alert and the exact time of occurrence. This pop-up windows provides links to useful resources and advice for resolution. You can also view the exact expression that generated the event.

15.8.1. Closing an Event

After determining what action to take, events should be closed.

To resolve an individual alert click the close link in the Operations/Notes column. Document the resolution using the Notes text area and choose the close event(s) button.

To close a number of alerts simultaneously, select the checkbox beside the alerts you wish to close and then click the close button to the lower or upper left side of the screen.

Once an event has been closed it appears on the Events screen showing a resolution notes link. Click this link to review the notes. Events that have been closed are saved in the Repository. If you wish to view closed events filter the display by choosing Closed from the Status drop-down box.

15.8.2. Notification of Events

If you have created notification groups and then configured individual rules to send their notification to one or more groups then the notification works as follows:

  • Notification of an event takes place when a rule is executed and the severity level for a given rule changes. For example, if during execution of a rule, the result of the rule goes from severity level Success to Critical, the configured notification groups will get one email with the detail of the event and current status.

  • If the status of the event has not changed when the rule is next executed, no new email is sent.

    This is true whether the rule is executed as part of it's normal schedule or execution of the rule has been explicitly requested.

SNMP notifications are sent each time a given rule is executed, irrespective of the current or returned state.

15.9. The Graphs Page

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

Navigate to the Graphs page by choosing the Graphs tab.

By default four graphs are displayed on the Monitor page. These graphs present information about the currently selected server or server group, showing the hit ratios, CPU utilization, connections, and database activity. Color coding helps distinguish different aspects of each graph.

From the Monitor page you can make permanent or temporary changes to the way a graph is displayed. For example, you can choose to display the last hour's activity or you can choose to view a specific period of time.

Persistent changes to the way the graphs display are only made from the Monitor page. You can set the size of the thumbnails and the full-sized graphs and you can also set their refresh interval. For more information, see Section 15.4.2, “The Server Graphs and Critical Events”. As with the Monitor page, the data shown in the graphs is determined by the server or group of servers selected in the server tree.

The Graphs page shows all the available graphs and provides the capability of adjusting the scale of the graphs, allowing a more or less detailed view as the situation requires. To ensure that you have the latest versions of the various graphs click on the Check For Updates link on the top left of this page.

All graphs support the ability to drag and select a specific area of the graph. When you select an area of the graph, the display changes to the Query Analyzer tab and displays the queries that were being executed during the selected time period. You can also zoom into the graph by selecting specific time periods. For more information on using the graphs to monitor the execution of specific queries, see Section 15.10.3, “Using Graphs to Identify Queries”.

15.9.1. Displaying Graphs

The total number of graphs varies depending upon your subscription level. The four graphs that appear by default on the Monitor page are:

  • Hit Ratios

  • Database Activity

  • Connections

  • CPU Utilization

When the Graphs page is first opened, no graphs are visible. To view a graph click the + button on the left or, to view all graphs, use the expand all button.

The larger size of graphs is the primary reason for viewing graphs on the Graphs page rather than on the Monitor page. Additionally, you can only show a maximum of six graphs on the Monitor page; the remaining graphs can only be viewed from the Graphs page.

15.9.2. Setting an Interval

Change the interval for a graph by choosing values from the Hours and Minutes drop-down list boxes. If necessary adjust the width and height of the graph and then click the update button. The changes to the time span apply to all the graphs on the Graphs page but have no effect on the graphs on the Monitor page.

To change the graphs both here and on the Monitor page use the configure graphs link on the top right. This opens a dialog box for setting the default interval for the x-axis. Save any changes that you have made and the values chosen will be the defaults whenever you log in. You can also change the defaults from the Monitor page as described in Section 15.4.2, “The Server Graphs and Critical Events”; defaults for other users will be unchanged.

Use the reset button to restore the default value for the interval. Doing this will also reset the default size of the graphs.

15.9.3. Setting a Time Span

Setting a graph to display a time span gives you a historical perspective on server activity. You may want to know what was happening at a specific point in time or you may wish to look at an extended period to determine patterns or trends. Changing the time span gives you the flexibility to do this.

In the Time Display drop-down list box select the From/To option. Choosing this option updates the display to include To and From text boxes.

Set the date you wish to start viewing from by manually entering the date in year, month, and day format (2007-03-14). However, it is much easier to click the calendar icon and choose a date from the drop-down calendar. Enter a terminating date in the same way. If you wish, you may also choose the specific time of day by selecting the hour and minute.

If necessary adjust the width and height of the graph and then click the update button. The changes to the time span apply to all the graphs on the Graphs page but have no effect on the graphs on the Monitor page. You cannot change the time span of the graphs that appear on the Monitor page. Changes apply only to the current user; defaults for other users will be unchanged.

Use the reset button to cancel your changes.

15.10. The Query Analyzer Page

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

Query Analyzer enables you to monitor the statements being executed on a monitored server and retrieve information about the query, number of executions and the execution times of each query. Queries are normalized, so that the unique data defined within each query has been removed. By removing the data specific elements of the queries, the generic queries can be counted and identified more easily.

Important

MySQL Query Analyzer is designed to gather query performance information from a variety of sources. Query Analyzer uses a new agent plug-in to proxy your queries and collect performance data that is then transmitted to the Enterprise Monitor. This is a new role for the Agent: it is no longer just monitoring, it is now optionally between your MySQL client application and the mysql server.

Depending upon your system load, it is possible to overload the proxy or have the proxy/agent consume system resources needed by mysql itself. In particular, the memory needed by the MySQL Agent for basic monitoring is fairly small and consistent and depends on the number of rules you have enabled. However, when the Query Analyzer is enabled, the Agent can use significantly more memory to monitor and analyze whatever queries you direct through it. In this case, the amount of memory used depends on the number of unique normalized queries, example queries and example EXPLAINs being processed plus the network bandwidth required to send this query performance data to the Service Manager. In general, the amount of memory used for the Query Analyzer is well-bounded, but under heavy load or, in some cases under older versions of linux, RAM usage by Query Analyzer may be too high for your environment and load.

Therefore we advise you to use this release of Query Analyzer extensively in development, test and stage environments under load for an extended period of time before considering usage in a production environment. For all deployments:

  1. Carefully monitor the Agent's resource consumption using the new graph Memory Usage - Agent graphs available on the Graph tab. You can also add an SMTP or SNMP notification to the new Heat Chart rule MySQL Agent Memory Usage Excessive.

  2. If the amount of memory consumed is too high, consider sampling queries during nonpeak hours or monitoring only a subset of queries on this system.

If you experience any problems with Query Analyzer, we're interested in working with you closely and quickly to resolve them. Please open a Support issue right away. We're already working hard on optimizing Agent/proxy RAM usage and are planning a series of rapid releases to quickly distribute these and other improvements to you.

Query Analyzer works by intercepting the SQL statements that your MySQL client application sends to the MySQL server. Instead of connecting direct to the MySQL Server, queries are routed through the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent, the agent/proxy forwards the queries on to the server and sends the replies back to the client application as normal. In addition to forwarding the queries, the agent/proxy will also normalize the queries and then supply the execution information about each query to the monitor. The forwarding functionality is provided by the same module that supports the MySQL Proxy application. For information on MySQL Proxy, see Section 14.6, “MySQL Proxy”.

Important

The MySQL Proxy component, and Query Analyzer, require that clients connecting through MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent are using MySQL 5.0 or later. Clients that use the library provided with MySQL 4.1 or earlier will not work with MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent.

Once your MySQL client application has been configured to communicate using the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent, queries will be monitored and the simplified queries, without the query specific data, will be sent to the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent.

There are a number of different ways that you can enable Query Analysis. For more information on the different options, see Section 15.10.1, “Enabling Query Analyzer”.

To analyse the queries captured by the agent/proxy, change to the Query Analyzer page. You can see an example of the table on that page in the figure below.

Figure 15.45. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Query Analyzer

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Query Analyzer

The main Query Analyzer table provides the summary information for all of the queries executed using the agent/proxy. The table will track all the queries submitted to the server using the agent/proxy. The table will show a maximum of 20 rows, and you can page through the list of queries by using the page numbers, or the next, previous, first, and last buttons. To filter the list of queries that are displayed, or to change the number of queries, see Section 15.10.4, “Filtering Query Analyzer Data”.

Each row within the table provides the statistical information for one normalized query statement. If you have configured multiple agent/proxies to accept and forward queries to different servers, then you can expand the server view. The summary information displayed is different depending on whether you have selected a server group or an individual server.

If you have selected a server group, then the information displayed is aggregated from across the entire group. The same query executed on multiple servers will show average, total and minimum/maximum information for that query across all the servers. If you select an individual server, then only queries executed on that server are included within the table.

For each row, the following columns are populated according to the selected filtering options. For example, if the filter have been configured to show queries within the last 30 minutes (Interval), then only queries executed during that time will be displayed, and the corresponding statistics, such as execution times, rows returned and bytes returned will be according to that 30 minute timespan.

  • Query: The normalized version of the query. Normalization removes the query-specific data so that different queries with different data parameters are identified as the same basic query.

    The information is shown as one query per row. Each query row is expandable, and can be expanded to show the execution times for individual servers for that query.

  • Database: The default database in use at the time of the query. The database name may not match the database used within the query if you have have explicitly stated the database name in the query.

  • Exec Count: The number of times that the query has been executed.

  • Exec Time: The execution time for all the matching queries. This is the time, for every invocation of the corresponding query, as calculated by comparing the time when the query was submitted and when the results were returned by the server. Times are expressed in HH:MM:SS.MS (hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds).

    The Execution column is further subdivided into the following columns:

    • Count: The total number of executions.

    • Total: The cumulative execution time for all the executions of this query.

    • Max: The maximum execution time for an execution of this query.

    • Avg: The average execution time for the execution of this query.

    When looking at the information provided in this query, you should consider comparing the average and maximum execution times to see if there was a problem on a specific server or during a specific time period when the query took place, as this may indicate an issue that needs to be investigated. For more information, see Section 15.10.5, “Using Query Analyzer Data”.

    Note

    Due to limitations in the counters used for monitor queries on Windows, the time reported for short queries may be reported 0.000. This will be fixed in a future release.

  • Rows: The rows returned by the query. The column is sub-divided into the following columns:

    • Total: The sum total number of rows returned by all executions of the query.

    • Max: The maximum number of rows returned by a single execution of the query.

    • Avg: The average number of rows returned by all executions of the query.

  • Bytes: The number of bytes returned by each query. The column is sub-divided into the following columns:

    • Total: The sum total bytes returned by all executions of the query.

    • Max: The maximum number of bytes returned by a single execution of the query.

    • Avg: The average number of bytes returned by all executions of the query.

  • First Seen: The first time the query was seen within the given filter conditions.

You can sort the list of queries by clicking the column name. The direction of the sort (highest to lowest, or lowest to highest) is indicated by a triangle next to the currently selected column. The default is to sort the list of queries by the Total Execution time.

15.10.1. Enabling Query Analyzer

There are three different ways of enabling query analyzer:

  • Change your MySQL client application to talk to the Proxy port you configured during installation. This requires changing your MySQL client application code, and may require that you stop and restart your MySQL client application , but does not require any changes to your MySQL server. For more information, see Section 15.10.1.1, “Enabling Query Analyzer by Changing the MySQL Client Application”.

  • Change your MySQL server to listen on a different port, and configure the Agent/proxy to listen on the original MySQL server port. This does not require any changes to your MySQL client application , but will require shutting down and restarting your MySQL server, which may affect your cache and performance. For more information, see Section 15.10.1.2, “Enabling Query Analyzer by Changing MySQL Server”.

  • Use IP tables to redirect the network packets to the agent/proxy.

Important

MySQL Query Analyzer is designed to gather query performance information from a variety of sources. Query Analyzer uses a new agent plug-in to proxy your queries and collect performance data that is then transmitted to the Enterprise Monitor. This is a new role for the Agent: it is no longer just monitoring, it is now optionally between your MySQL client application and the mysql server.

Depending upon your system load, it is possible to overload the proxy or have the proxy/agent consume system resources needed by mysql itself. In particular, the memory needed by the MySQL Agent for basic monitoring is fairly small and consistent and depends on the number of rules you have enabled. However, when the Query Analyzer is enabled, the Agent can use significantly more memory to monitor and analyze whatever queries you direct through it. In this case, the amount of memory used depends on the number of unique normalized queries, example queries and example EXPLAINs being processed plus the network bandwidth required to send this query performance data to the Service Manager. In general, the amount of memory used for the Query Analyzer is well-bounded, but under heavy load or, in some cases under older versions of linux, RAM usage by Query Analyzer may be too high for your environment and load.

Therefore we advise you to use this release of Query Analyzer extensively in development, test and stage environments under load for an extended period of time before considering usage in a production environment. For all deployments:

  1. Carefully monitor the Agent's resource consumption using the new graph Memory Usage - Agent graphs available on the Graph tab. You can also add an SMTP or SNMP notification to the new Heat Chart rule MySQL Agent Memory Usage Excessive.

  2. If the amount of memory consumed is too high, consider sampling queries during nonpeak hours or monitoring only a subset of queries on this system.

If you experience any problems with Query Analyzer, we're interested in working with you closely and quickly to resolve them. Please open a Support issue right away. We're already working hard on optimizing Agent/proxy RAM usage and are planning a series of rapid releases to quickly distribute these and other improvements to you.

Note that you must have enabled Query Analyzer within the agent/proxy during installation. If you did not enable Query Analyzer during the installation of the agent/proxy, check the following elements within the main mysql-monitor-agent.ini configuration file:

  • Add the proxy plugin to the plugins parameter:

    plugins=proxy,agent
  • Ensure that the quan.lua items file is enabled in the agent-item-files configuration property:

    agent-item-files = share/mysql-proxy/items/quan.lua,share/mysql-proxy/items/items-mysql-monitor.xml
    
  • Check and set the proxy-address, proxy-backend-addresses, and proxy-lua-script settings are configured:

    proxy-address=:6446
    proxy-backend-addresses = 127.0.0.1:3306
    proxy-lua-script        = share/mysql-proxy/quan.lua
    

For more information on these configuration options, see Section 15.3.3.6.1, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent (mysql-monitor-agent.ini) Configuration”.

Note

The Query Analyzer functionality may show as being enabled on a server, even though the modules within MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent may not have been enabled.

You may also need to make some additional changes to the security configuration on your server to ensure that queries are correctly reported to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager:

  • You must ensure that each user configured within your MySQL client application that connects through the agent/proxy and is required to report query analyzer information is allowed to connect to the server from the host on which the agent/proxy is running. When the user connects to the agent/proxy, and the agent/proxy connects to the server the host of the agent/proxy will be used as the identifying client host name during the connection.

    Warning

    Because the proxy is providing the immediate connectivity to the MySQL server, authentication must use the proxy hostname, not the client hostname.

    To update your user credentials, you need to use the GRANT statement. For example:

    mysql> GRANT SELECT,UPDATE,INSERT on database.* to 'user'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';
  • The MySQL client application user must have SELECT privileges on the mysql.inventory table. This table contains the server UUID and is required to report the query analyzer data to the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. To enable this, use the GRANT option:

    mysql> GRANT SELECT on mysql.inventory to 'user'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

15.10.1.1. Enabling Query Analyzer by Changing the MySQL Client Application

Generally, changing your MySQL client application is the easiest and recommended method. For example, given a typical structure like the one shown in the figure below, the client application would need to be modified so that it no longer communicated directly with the MySQL server, but to the agent/proxy.

Figure 15.46. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Standard Agent/Monitor Topology

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Standard agent/monitor
            topology

You can see an example of the structure when communicating using the agent/proxy below.

Figure 15.47. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Query Analyzer Agent/Monitor Topology

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Query Analyzer
            agent/monitor topology

To enable query analyzer within your MySQL client application:

  1. Make sure that the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and your MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent are configured and running.

  2. Confirm the configuration of your agent by examining the contents of the etc/mysql-monitor-agent.ini file within your installed Agent directory.

    Queries will be sent to the host specified in the proxy-backend-addresses parameter, and the agent will listen for connections to be redirected to the server on the host name and port configured in the proxy-address parameter.

  3. Now modify your MySQL client application to communicate with the address specified in the proxy-address parameter.

    Alternatively, if you do not want to modify your application directly, you can use iptables or firewall rules to redirect queries from the original host/port combination to the agent's port.

    Because connections to the MySQL server will be coming from the agent/proxy, not the original host, the user credentials used must be have a suitable GRANT statement for connections from localhost, or the host on which the agent/proxy is executing. The user name and password information will be passed on directly through the agent/proxy from the client to the server.

  4. Confirm that your MySQL client application still operates normally. There should be no difference between communicating directly with the MySQL server and communicating using the agent/proxy.

Note

If you are using the mysql client to connect to the agent/proxy and your backend servers, make sure that you are communicating with the proxy over the right port. By default, if you specify localhost as the host name, then mysql will connect using the local Unix domain socket, rather than the TCP/IP socket.

You can enforce mysql to use the right port either by explicitly requesting the protocol type, or by using the IP address rather than localhost. For example, both of these command lines will start the client using the right protocol:

shell> mysql --port=6446 --protocol=tcp
shell> mysql --port=6446 --host=127.0.0.1
Note

It is recommended that you use one agent/proxy per MySQL server instance. The agent/proxy is not able to forward queries to multiple MySQL server backends.

15.10.1.2. Enabling Query Analyzer by Changing MySQL Server

When enabling Query Analyzer by changing the MySQL Server, you need to shutdown your server, edit the MySQL configuration file, and then restart MySQL. You will also need to change your Agent/proxy configuration so that the Agent/proxy is listening on the original MySQL TCP/IP port. To use this method:

  1. Edit the /etc/my.cnf or other MySQL configuration file and change or add the port setting from it's current value (default 3306), to another value. For example:

    port                                            = 3307
    
  2. Shutdown your MySQL Server.

  3. Startup your MySQL Server and confirm that is running.

  4. Edit your MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent configuration so that the agent/proxy is listening for connections on the original MySQL port:

    proxy-address=:3306
    proxy-backend-addresses = 127.0.0.1:3307
  5. Stop and restart MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent.

You should now be able to connect to your MySQL server through the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent by connecting on the original port:

shell> mysql --host=127.0.0.1

15.10.2. Getting Detailed Query Information

If you click an individual query, a pop-up window will provide more detailed information about the individual query. You can see an example of this in the figure below. The available tabs within this window will depend on whether you have configured the more detailed query information. By default, you will always be provided the Summary Details page. If enabled, you may also view Example Details, which provide more detailed data about a specific query, including the data and parameters submitted. In addition, you may also enable Example Explain, which provides you with the ability to remotely execute an EXPLAIN statement with the specified query and view the resulting information.

  • The Canonical Query tab:

    Figure 15.48. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Canonical Query Tab for a Query

    MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Canonical Query Tab for
              a Query

    In addition to the summary information given in the table, you will get detailed execution statistics, including the minimum time, maximum time, average time, total time and the standard deviation. The standard deviation will enable you to determine whether a particular invocation of a query is outside the normal distribution of times for the given query.

    Row statistics provide more detailed contents on the maximum, minimum, average, total, and standard deviation for the number of rows returned by the query, and the total size and maximum size of the data returned. The time period for the total and average figures is shown under the Summary Time Span.

    The detailed view for a query also provides three different views of the query. The truncated version is a shortened version of the query. The full version of the query is the entire query statement. Normalization removes the constants from the individual queries so that queries following the same logical structure are identified as the same basic query.

    To close the query detail window, click the Hide button.

    To simplify the identification of a given query, you can create a query alias. The alias will be used in place of the normalized query text within the Query Analyzer table. To create an alias for a query, click the create alias link against the query. The maximum length for a query alias is 255 characters.

  • The Example Query tab:

    Figure 15.49. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Example Query Tab for a Query

    MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Example Query Tab for a
              Query

    The Example Details tab provides detailed information about the most expensive query executed, as determined by the execution time.

    In addition to the full query, with data, that was executed, the tab shows the execution time, data, user, thread ID, client host and execution host for the given query.

  • The Explain Query tab:

    Figure 15.50. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Explain Query Tab for a Query

    MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Explain Query Tab for a
              Query

    The Example Explain tab enables you to view the output from running the query with the EXPLAIN prefix. For more information, see Section 12.8.2, “EXPLAIN Syntax”.

15.10.3. Using Graphs to Identify Queries

The MySQL Enterprise Dashboard supports correlated graphs so that you can compare the graphed execution parameters, such as the server load, thread statistics, or RAM usage, against the queries that were being executed by the server or servers being monitored at that time.

You can use the correlated graphs in two different ways:

  • By dragging and selecting an area on a graph as displayed within the Monitor over view tab, or the Graphs tab of the MySQL Enterprise Dashboard. When using either of these two tabs, you can drag and select any region on a displayed graph, and the display will change to the Query Analyzer tab, displaying the corresponding zoomed graph, and the associated queries being executed during the selected period.

  • You can select a graph to be displayed within the Query Analyzer tab. Open the Graph section, and use the pop-up list to select the graph to be displayed. You can see an example of this in Figure 15.51, “MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Correlated Graphs”.

When using the correlated graphs, selecting an area within the graph will set the start and end time within the query filtering selection. You can combine with other filtering options, such as the Query Type, to zero-in on the queries that you want to examine.

To use the graphs in this manner, select a starting point and click, while holding down the button, drag a selection area to set the time-range for the query display. The time range that you have selected will be displayed above the graph as you select the area.

Figure 15.51. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Correlated Graphs

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Correlated Graphs

You can also explicitly zoom in an out of the displayed graph by using the links next to the Zoom label. You can select to show just an hour of the graph material, or larger ranges up to two days. At all times, the area on the graph highlighted in blue is the actual date/time range selected within the list of analyzed queries.

For more information on filtering your queries, see Section 15.10.4, “Filtering Query Analyzer Data”.

15.10.4. Filtering Query Analyzer Data

You can filter the queries shown within the Query Analyzer table by using the form at the top of the table. The different fields of the form are used to specify the parameters for the filter process. Once you have specified a filter, all the queries and related statistics shown within the Query Analyzer table are displayed in relation to the filter settings. For example, by default, the filter settings show the queries for the last 30 minutes. All the statistics shown are relative to the last 30 minutes, including average, maximum and execution counts.

The filter fields are:

  • Search Type and Query Search support text searching of the normalized query. For the search type you can specify either a basic text match, or a regular expression match. In addition to the basic text match, you can also search for a query that does not contain a particular string. For regular expression searches, you can specify whether the regular expression should match, or not match (negative regexp) the queries. Regular expressions are parsed using the standard MySQL REGEXP() function. For more information, see Section 11.5.2, “Regular Expressions”.

    Note

    The search is performed against the canonical version of the query. You cannot search against specific text or values within the parameters of the query itself.

  • Database: Limit the queries to those executed within a specific database. The database match is performed using the LIKE match from the MySQL database, hence you can use the % and _ characters to multiple and single character matches. For more information, see Section 3.3.4.7, “Pattern Matching”.

  • The Time Display menu selects whether the time selection for filtering should be based on the time interval (only queries recorded within the displayed time period are shown, using the Hours and Minutes pop-up), or whether the selection should be based on a time period (From/To), where you can select the time range to be displayed.

    Using the Interval mode shows queries within the given time period from the point the graph was updated. For example, if you select 30 minutes, then the queries shown were captured within the last 30 minutes. If you updated the display at 14:00, then the queries displayed would have been captured between 13:30 and 14:00. Using interval mode limits the timespan for the filter selection to a maximum of 23 hours and 59 minutes.

    Using the From/To mode enables you to show queries between specific dates and times. Using this mode you can show only the queries received during a specific time span, and you can display the query history for a much longer time period, for as long as you have been recording query analysis information.

  • The View selection determines whether the information should be returned on a group basis, where an aggregate of the same query executed on all monitored servers is shown, or on a Server basis, where queries are summarized by individual server. If the latter option has been selected, the table includes an additional column showing the server.

  • Query Type lets you select the type of query on which to filter queries. Selecting All will show all queries. Additional query types you can select include SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE and other main SQL query types.

  • Limit specifies the number of queries to be displayed within each page.

When you have set your filter parameters, you can update the Query Analysis display by clicking the filter button. To reset the fields to the default settings click the reset button.

15.10.5. Using Query Analyzer Data

The information provided by Query Analyzer can be complex to understand and resolve into simple targets and resolutions for your MySQL client application. The information can be used in different ways to find problems in your queries or your servers, or both. Provided below are some tips on how to get the best out of the Query Analyzer interface, and how to identify different queries and problems based on the information shown by the Query Analyzer system.

First, consider the information provided by individual columns by your queries. In particular, the following columns can highlight specific problems with your queries or database server:

  • Execution Count: High execution counts, especially for a query that you expect to be executed very rarely, may indicate that your MySQL client application is either running a simple query to frequently, or may be running a query multiple times that could otherwise be cached. You should pay particular attention to queries where the execution count increases significantly in a short period of time compared to the normal execution rate.

    How to find: Use the sort feature to sort the queries by execution count.

  • New queries: New queries appearing in the Query Analyzer tab, especially if they appear after other queries have been in the display for a number of hours or days may indicate a number of issues:

  • Execution times: Long execution times, and a long max execution time compared to the average execution time may indicate a problem with a specific query and specific parameters.

    How to find: Use the sort feature to sort the queries by execution count.

You can also use the filtering and sort options to get specific information about potential problem queries.

15.10.6. Troubleshooting Query Analyzer

If you are having trouble with Query Analyzer, either because the information is not being shown or the full range of queries that you expect are not appearing in the Query Analyzer page then there are a number of systems you can check.

To confirm that your system is correctly configured for Query Analysis, check the following:

  • Confirm that the agent is running by checking the Agent log and the status of the server within MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

  • Check the configuration of the agent. You must confirm the following:

    • The plugins parameter within the main configuration file, mysql-monitor-agent.ini, must contain the proxy plugin:

      plugins=proxy,agent
    • The agent-item-files parameter within the main configurationfile, mysql-monitor-agent.ini, must specify the share/mysql-proxy/items/quan.lua script:

      agent-item-files = share/mysql-proxy/items/quan.lua, »
           share/mysql-proxy/items/items-mysql-monitor.xml
      
    • The proxy configuration parameters must point to the MySQL server where you want your queries to be sent. For example, if you are running your agent on the same host as your MySQL server then you might have the following lines in your mysql-monitor-agent.ini file:

      proxy-address=:6446
      proxy-backend-addresses = 127.0.0.1:3306
      proxy-lua-script        = share/mysql-proxy/quan.lua
      

      The above configuration can means:

      • The agent/proxy will listen on the current machine, using port 6446 (proxy-address).

      • The agent/proxy will send all queries received on to the host 127.0.0.1 on port 3306 (the standard MySQL port), as per the proxy-backend-addresses parameter.

    You can see a sample complete configuration file (mysql-monitor-agent.ini), using the 127.0.0.1 as the MySQL backend server, and reporting to a MySQL Enterprise Service Manager called monitor:

    [mysql-proxy]
    plugins=proxy,agent
    agent-mgmt-hostname = http://agent:[email protected]:18080/heartbeat
    mysqld-instance-dir= etc/instances
    agent-item-files = share/mysql-proxy/items/quan.lua,share/mysql-proxy/items/items-mysql-monitor.xml
    proxy-address=:6446
    proxy-backend-addresses = 127.0.0.1:3306
    proxy-lua-script        = share/mysql-proxy/quan.lua
    agent-uuid = a3113263-4993-4890-8235-cadef9617c4b
    log-file = mysql-monitor-agent.log
    pid-file=/opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/mysql-monitor-agent.pid
  • Confirm that you can connect through the agent proxy to your backend MySQL server. You can do this by checking with the MySQL client. You must specify the same options as you would if you were connecting to the original server, including specifying the same user and password information:

  • Check that your MySQL client application is configured to use the configured proxy port, instead of the real MySQL port when sending queries.

  • Confirm that Query Analyzer enabled for your host. For more information, see Section 15.10.7, “Query Analyzer Settings”.

15.10.7. Query Analyzer Settings

There are a number of settings related to the Query Analyzer data. You can configure the query analyzer operation by using the configure query analyzer link within the Query Analyzer tab, or through the configure query analyzer button within the Manage Servers tab within the Settings tab. Both methods provide you with the same dialog:

Figure 15.52. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Query Analyzer Configuration

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Query Analyzer
          Configuration

Through either solution, the configuration options that you select are applied to the individual server or server group selected within the Serversnavigation panel.

There are three configuration options available through either method:

  • Enable Query Analyzer configures whether query analyzer should be enabled for this server or server group. If selected, query analyzer will be enabled. To disable, delect the check box.

    If Query Analyzer has been enabled, then you can additional configure the Example Query function by selecting the Enable Example Query checkbox. Enabling this option provides an additional tab when you open the Canonical Query window when clicking a query.

  • Enable Example Query allows the Query Analyzer to display more information about individual queries. When enabled, queries and their data items (rather than the canonical form shown by default) will be provided. Enabling this option may expose the full query statements and therefore may present a security issue.

    With the Example Query option enabled, an additional tab within the query summary details is made available. For more information, see Section 15.10.2, “Getting Detailed Query Information”.

    If you have enabled Example Query, then you can additional enable Example Explain, To enable this tab, select the Enable Example Explain checkbox.

  • Enable Example Explain provides another tab when viewing a query where you can view the output from EXPLAIN output from MySQL for the selected query. This will show the full query and how the query was executed within the servers.

    When the EXPLAIN functionality has been enabled, the Auto-Explain Threshold controls when the EXPLAIN output for a query is triggered. Queries that take longer than the Auto-Explain Threshold will have the EXPLAIN output generated and stored in the database to be display in the Example Explain tab.

    Enabling this option may add overhead to the execution of your server, as the server will run an EXPLAIN statement each time it identifies a long running query. For more information, Section 15.13, “MySQL Enterprise Monitor Frequently Asked Questions”.

To enable or disable query analyzer for an individual server, go to the Settings page and click the Manage Servers link. To configure all the properties, click the configure query analyzer link next to server you want modify.

Alternatively, for each server, the Query Analyzer column shows the current setting, On or Off, and whether the Example and Explain functionality is enabled. To change any setting, click the current status to toggle between the On/Off position.

To disable or enable Query Analyzer for the selected servers, use the disable query analyzer or enable query analyzer buttons within the Settings page. You must have selected one or more servers from the list of available servers before selecting these buttons.

You can use the options that you have just selected as the default for all new servers that register with MySQL Enterprise Service Manager by using select the Make this the default for all new servers checkbox. By default, when a new server registers with MySQL Monitor, the server is automatically configured to supply Query Analyzer data. This can have impact on the performance of your monitor and agent as it increases the amount of information supplied to the MySQL Monitor.

Configuration of Query Analyzer occurs through the configure defaults button from within the Query Analyzer page.

15.11. The Replication Page

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

Navigate to the Replication page by choosing the Replication tab. This page provides a quick summary view of the state of your replication servers or, if you wish, you can drill down and determine specifics about any master or slave.

Note

Servers, whether masters or slaves, must be monitored for them to appear on this page.

Note

There will be no Replication page if your subscription level does not support this feature.

The Replication page groups all master servers with their slaves. Masters and their slaves are autodiscovered and a grouping is created. This grouping shows up on the replication page and also in the Heat Chart on the Monitor page. Scans run on a five minute interval, so depending upon the order of discovery, it can take as long as 2 polling intervals to create a complete group.

Figure 15.53. MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Replication Groups

MySQL Enterprise Dashboard: Replication groups

Discovery events are logged to the Replication log. To view this log navigate to the Settings page and choose the Logs link. View all replication-related events by clicking the Replication link. This log can be a useful tool should you need to debug the replication topology discovery process.

Warning

The agent must be installed on the same machine as the server you are monitoring for discovery to work properly. Do not use remote monitoring.

Replication groups can be managed from the Manage Servers page in the same way as other groups. However, any slaves removed from a server group will automatically be restored to that group. It is also possible to add nonslaves to a replication grouping. For more information about server groupings see Section 15.5.3.2, “Grouping Servers”.

15.11.1. Replication Page Details

Choose a value from the refresh drop-down list box to set the rate at which information is updated. This refresh rate applies only to the information presented on this page: It is independent of the rate set for the Monitor page.

The following columns describe replication servers and their slaves:

  • Servers: Displays the group name and any master servers and slaves

  • Type: Indicates the topology of a server group or in the case of individual servers, whether a server is a master, a master/slave, or a slave

  • Slave IO: Reports the status of the slave I/O thread

  • Slave SQL: Reports the status of the slave SQL thread

  • Seconds Behind: The number of seconds the slave is behind the master. This column is blank if a server is a master.

  • Binlog: The binary log file name

  • Binlog Pos: The current position in the binary log file

  • Master Binlog: The master binary log file name

  • Master Binlog Pos: The current position in the master binary log file

  • Last Error: The most recent error

  • Unlabeled Column: Use the rename group link on the server group line to edit the server group name

Levels of indentation in the Servers column show the relationship between master servers and their slaves. Most column headings are active links that allow you to change the order of display by clicking the header. Sorting works differently for different column groupings. Click the Seconds Behind header to order servers by the number of seconds they are behind their master. However, in all cases, the server topology is respected. For example, in a TREE topology, ordering occurs within branches only.

If the agent is down, servers show in bold red in the Servers column. The Slave IO and the Slave SQL columns display stopped in red text if these threads are not running. If an agent is down, italics is used to display the last know status of the I/O or SQL threads.

Clicking a master server opens a dialog box that displays information about the server. The information shown includes:

  • The number of slave servers

  • The binary log file name

  • The binary log position

  • Which databases are replicated and which not

The dialog box also includes a link that allows the user to hide or show the slave servers.

Clicking a slave server opens a dialog window showing extensive information about the slave.

15.12. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Reference

This appendix contains reference information for MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

15.12.1. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Limitations

The following list provides information on known limitations within MySQL Enterprise Monitor

  • The maximum size for data stored within the mysql.inventory table is 64 bytes.

  • The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent when operating for Query Analyzer as a proxy cannot handle queries greater than 16MB.

  • The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent when operating for Query Analyzer as a proxy does not support clients using the MySQL protocol older than MySQL 5.0.

  • The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent when operating for Query Analyzer as a proxy does not support clients affects the authentication of clients. As the proxy is the real client connecting to the backend MySQL server, authentication should use the hostname of the proxy, not the original client.

  • When viewing the graphs generated by MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, the fonts used for the graphs may not be displayed properly if the required font is missing.

    You can specify a custom font by setting a custom property within the embedded MySQL Server to a known working font. To do this, connect to your embedded MySQL sever using the information provided by the configuration_report.txt file. Once connected, execute the following statment:

    mysql> INSERT INTO map_entries VALUES (1,'Helvetica','graph.font');

    Replacing Helvetica with the font you want to use.

    The font used for graph rendering will be selected as follows, in this order:

    1. The user override value.

    2. The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager default of Arial.

    3. The graph engine default of SansSerif.

  • It is not possible to monitor more than one MySQL Enterprise Dashboard instance hosted on the same machine simultaneously within the same browser, even if each MySQL Enterprise Dashboard uses a different port for access. The effect of this limitation may be more significant on certain browsers.

  • When monitoring multiple MySQL instances with one MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent, if any of the MySQL instances are down at the point when the agent is started, the agent will not attempt to reconnect to the servers. This could lead to indications that MySQL instances were down when in fact they were running and available. To avoid this problem, ensure all of the monitored instances are available before starting the agent.

15.12.2. Supported Browsers

The MySQL Enterprise Dashboard is known to work within the following browser environments:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.x, 8.x

    Note

    MySQL Enterprise Dashboard is not compatible with the Compatibility View option within Internet Explorer 8.x. Please make sure this option is disabled before using MySQL Enterprise Dashboard

  • Safari 3.2, 4.x

  • Firefox 3.0, 3.5

The MySQL Enterprise Dashboard is known not to work within the following browser environments:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.x

  • Opera

  • Google Chrome

15.12.3. Installation Requirements

The Service Manager is available for Windows, Mac OS X, and a variety of Unix and Linux operating systems. In most cases, the standard operating system and packages are supported without further libraries and modules. All the required components are installed automatically.

  • Mac OS X Notes

    • The Mac OS X Service Manager is only supported on Intel architecture. However, the Mac OS X agent is supported for both Intel and the PowerPC.

    • Installation requires approximately 450MB of disk space for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

  • Windows Notes

    • Installation requires approximately 260MB of disk space for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

  • Unix/Linux Notes

    • Installation requires approximately 450MB of disk space for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

    • On FreeBSD, you must have bind8 installed.

Note

Disk-space usage requirements are approximate for the base application. During usage, the service manager records detailed information about your MySQL servers and environment, and disk space usage will increase with time to record this historical data. You can control how long information is stored once the service manager has been installed.

The minimum recommended requirements for the service manager are at least a 2GHz CPU, with two or more CPU cores, and at least 2GB of RAM. If you are monitoring a large number of services, then there will be an increased load on the server manager. Running the service manager on a machine that is already running other tasks is only recommended if you are monitoring a small number of agents. For monitoring five or more agents simultaneously, you should dedicate a machine to the process. For more information, see Section 15.12.5, “Choosing Suitable MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Hardware Configurations”.

The Monitor Agent is available for a wide range of operating systems. For an up-to-date list please see the http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/. The agent can be used to monitor any MySQL server from version 4.0.x through 6.0.x.

Production support is not currently available for MySQL Enterprise Monitor (Service Manager component) in virtualized environments.

15.12.4. Creating a new SSL KeyStore

The SSL certificate that is provided with the server during installation is a sample certificate only. If you want to use SSL for communicating with your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and MySQL Enterprise Dashboard you should replace the supplied certificate with your own certificate.

The certificate keystore is located in the apache-tomcat/conf/myKeyStore file within your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation.

To create a new, self-signed, certificate, use the keytool command (provided with Java SE Security) to create a new certificate file:

shell> keytool -genkey -alias tomcat -keyalg RSA -validity 1825 -keystore newKeystore

You will be prompted to fill in the certificate information and to provide a unique password for the certificate.

The -validity specifies the length of the certificate created, specified in days. The -alias is required to ensure that the certificate is associated with tomcat.

Once you have created the new keystore, you should shutdown MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, copy the new keystore file to apache-tomcat/conf/myKeyStore and restart MySQL Enterprise Service Manager.

If you have an existing certificate that you would like to import into your keystore, you need to import the certificate using the following command:

shell> keytool -import -alias tomcat -keystore newKeystore -file public.pem

For more information on using SSL certificates in Tomcat see Apache Tomcat 6.0: SSL Configuration HOW-TO.

15.12.5. Choosing Suitable MySQL Enterprise Service Manager Hardware Configurations

Running MySQL Enterprise Service Manager places a reasonable load on your system, and this load increases linearly as you add more agents monitoring more servers. Ideally, you should use a dedicated machine for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, rather than running it alongside other applications and services.

Minimum System Requirements

  • 2 or more CPU cores

  • 2 or more GB of RAM

  • Disk I/O subsystem applicable for a write-intensive database

Recommended System Requirements (if monitoring 100 or more MySQL servers)

  • 4 or more CPU cores

  • 8 or more GB of RAM

  • Disk I/O subsystem applicable for a write-intensive database (RAID10, RAID 0+1)

15.12.6. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent Reference

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent supports the following configurable options:

Table 15.2. mysql-monitor-agent Help Options

FormatOption FileDescriptionIntroductionDeprecatedRemoved
--help Show help options   
--help-admin Show options for the admin-module   
--help-agent Show agent options   
--help-all Show all help options   
--help-monitor Show monitor options   
--help-proxy Show options for the proxy-module   

Table 15.3. mysql-monitor-agent Admin Options

FormatOption FileDescriptionIntroductionDeprecatedRemoved
--admin-addressadmin-addressDefines the listening address and port for the admin module   
--admin-lua-scriptadmin-lua-scriptScript to execute by the admin module   
--admin-passwordadmin-passwordPassword for authentication for admin module   
--admin-usernameadmin-usernameUsername for authentication for admin module   
--proxy-addressproxy-addressListening address:port of the proxy server   

Table 15.4. mysql-monitor-agent Agent Options

FormatOption FileDescriptionIntroductionDeprecatedRemoved
--agent-collector-pluginsagent-collector-pluginsLoad the specified collector plugins   
--agent-force-uncorkingagent-force-uncorkingForcibly turn off corking (randomization of data collection intervals)2.1.0  
--agent-generate-uuidagent-generate-uuidGenerate a UUID for use with the agent-uuid   
--agent-heartbeat-intervalagent-heartbeat-intervalThe interval for generating heartbeat operations   
--agent-host-idagent-host-idThe host ID for the agent   
--agent-host-id-commandlineagent-host-id-commandlineThe command to use to generate the agent host id   
--agent-hostnameagent-hostnameHostname of the agent host   
--agent-item-filesagent-item-filesList of data items for additional collections   
--agent-max-response-sizeagent-max-response-sizeMaximum response size for agent data2.1.0  
--agent-mgmt-hostnameagent-mgmt-hostnameURL of the management server   
--agent-run-os-testsagent-run-os-testsRun the operating system tests and shutdown   
--agent-sync-attemptsagent-sync-attemptsSynchronize the attempts to connect at resync   
--agent-track-allocagent-track-allocEnable the tracking of the allocation sizes   
--agent-uuidagent-uuidUUID of this agent   

Table 15.5. mysql-monitor-agent Monitor Options

FormatOption FileDescriptionIntroductionDeprecatedRemoved
--monitor-intervalmonitor-intervalInterval for executing queries against the backend   
--monitor-lua-scriptmonitor-lua-scriptScript filename for the monitor   
--monitor-passwordmonitor-passwordSet the password for the monitored MySQL Server   
--monitor-usernamemonitor-usernameSet the username for the monitored MySQL Server   

Table 15.6. mysql-monitor-agent Proxy Options

FormatOption FileDescriptionIntroductionDeprecatedRemoved
--no-proxyno-proxyDon't start the proxy module   
--proxy-backend-addressesproxy-backend-addressesAddress:port of the remote MySQL server   
--proxy-fix-bug-25371proxy-fix-bug-25371Enable the fix for Bug#25371 (for mysqld > 2.0.0.12) for older libmysql versions   
--proxy-lua-scriptproxy-lua-scriptFilename for Lua script for proxy operations   
--proxy-pool-no-change-userproxy-pool-no-change-userDon't use the protocol CHANGE_USER to reset the connection when coming from the connection pool   
--proxy-read-only-backend-addressesproxy-read-only-backend-addressesAddress:port of the remote MySQL server (read-only)   
--proxy-skip-profilingproxy-skip-profilingDisabled profiling of queries   

Table 15.7. mysql-monitor-agent Application Options

FormatOption FileDescriptionIntroductionDeprecatedRemoved
--basedirbasedirSpecify the base directory to prepend to paths in the config   
--daemondaemonStart in daemon-mode   
--defaults-filedefaults-fileSpecify the configuration file   
--keepalivekeepaliveTry to restart the proxy if a crash occurs   
--log-backtrace-on-crashlog-backtrace-on-crashTry to invoke the debug and generate a backtrace on crash   
--log-filelog-fileSpecify the file for logging error messages   
--log-levellog-levelLogging level   
--log-use-sysloglog-use-syslogLog errors to syslog   
--lua-cpathlua-cpathSet the LUA_CPATH   
--lua-pathlua-pathSet the LUA_PATH   
--max-open-filesmax-open-filesSpecify the maximum number of open files to support   
--pid-filepid-filePID file to store the process ID (when in daemon mode)   
--plugin-dirplugin-dirPath to the plugin files   
--pluginspluginsList of plugins to load   
--useruserSpecify the user to use when running mysql-monitor-agent   
--versionversionShow the version information   
  • --help

    Command-Line Format--help
    -?

    Show available help options.

  • --help-all

    Command-Line Format--help-all

    Show all help options.

  • --help-admin

    Command-Line Format--help-admin

    Show options for the admin-module.

  • --help-proxy

    Command-Line Format--help-proxy

    Show options for the proxy-module.

  • --help-monitor

    Command-Line Format--help-monitor

    Show options for the monitor module.

  • --help-agent

    Command-Line Format--help-agent

    Show options for the agent module.

  • --admin-address=host:port

    Command-Line Format--admin-address
    Option-File Formatadmin-address
     Permitted Values
    Typestring
    Default:4041

    Specify the host name (or IP address) and port for the administration port. The default is localhost:4041.

  • --admin-lua-script=script

    Command-Line Format--admin-lua-script
    Option-File Formatadmin-lua-script
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name
    Default

    Specify the script to use for the administration module for the proxy.

  • --admin-password=pass

    Command-Line Format--admin-password
    Option-File Formatadmin-password
     Permitted Values
    Typestring
    Default

    Define the password to use to authenticate users wanting to connect to the administration module of mysql-monitor-agent. The administration module uses the MySQL protocol to request a username and password for connections.

  • --admin-username=user

    Command-Line Format--admin-username
    Option-File Formatadmin-username
     Permitted Values
    Typestring
    Defaultroot

    Define the username to use to authenticate users wanting to connect to the administration module of mysql-monitor-agent. The default username is root. The administration module uses the MySQL protocol to request a username and password for connections.

  • --agent-collector-plugins=user

    Command-Line Format--agent-collector-plugins
    Option-File Formatagent-collector-plugins
     Permitted Values
    Typenumeric
    Defaultcollect_lua

    A comma-separated list of the plugins to be used and loaded by the agent and used to provide collector items.

  • --agent-force-uncorking

    Version Introduced2.1.0
    Command-Line Format--agent-force-uncorking
    Option-File Formatagent-force-uncorking

    Forcibly turn off the corking of responses sent to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. The corking mechanism tries to randomize the collection intervals of data sent up to the server to prevent flooding the server with information.

    The frequency of collecting the data is not modified by this setting.

  • --agent-generate-uuid

    Command-Line Format--agent-generate-uuid
    Option-File Formatagent-generate-uuid

    Regenerates a UUID for the agent. You can use this to generate a new UUID if you have copied configuration information for an agent from one machine to another. To use:

    shell> /opt/mysql/enterprise/agent/bin/mysql-monitor-agent --agent-generate-uuid
    ee9296d7-f7cd-4fee-8b26-ead884ebf398
    2009-03-05 11:49:37: (critical) shutting down normally
    

    For more information, see Section 15.3.3.6.3, “Monitoring Multiple MySQL Servers”.

  • --agent-heartbeat-interval=#

    Command-Line Format--agent-heartbeat-interval
    Option-File Formatagent-heartbeat-interval
     Permitted Values
    Typenumeric
    Default3

    Specify the heartbeat interval. The agent sends heartbeat messages to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager to indicate that it is available and still running and monitoring servers. The MySQL Enterprise Service Manager uses this information to help identify when an agent is available or not.

  • --agent-host-id=HOSTID

    Command-Line Format--agent-host-id
    Option-File Formatagent-host-id

    Define the agent host id. The host id should be a unique identifier for the host on which the agent is running, and is different to the agent UUID. You can override the host ID for use within HA environments where you have two identical agent configurations, one on a live server, and one on a backup server to be brought into use if the primary server fails. The host ID is used to identify the host by the server, and during failover you want the host ID to remain constant as you monitor either the original or failover (replacement) server.

  • --host-id-commandline

    Command-Line Format--agent-host-id-commandline
    Option-File Formatagent-host-id-commandline

    Specify the command line to generate the host ID. By default, the host ID is generated by using a variety of methods configured for a specific platform, including using SSH keys and embedded host ID information. You can replace this with an alternative command-line

  • --basedir

    Command-Line Format--agent-hostname
    Option-File Formatagent-hostname

    Override the automatically determined hostname. You can use this to specify an alternate hostname for the agent. This can be useful if your host has multiple hostnames and you want the machine identified by a specific hostname.

  • --agent-item-files

    Command-Line Format--agent-item-files
    Option-File Formatagent-item-files

    A comma separated list of the item files used to load data items that are then collected and sent to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. For more information, see Section 15.7.5, “Creating a Custom Data Collection Item”.

  • --agent-max-response-size

    Version Introduced2.1.0
    Command-Line Format--agent-max-response-size
    Option-File Formatagent-max-response-size
     Permitted Values
    Typenumeric
    Default65536

    Specify the maximum size of the response packet sent to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

  • --agent-mgmt-hostname

    Command-Line Format--agent-mgmt-hostname
    Option-File Formatagent-mgmt-hostname

    Set the URL of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager where collected data is sent. The URL should include the username and password for the agents, for example: http://agent:[email protected]:18080/heartbeat.

    Note

    If you have the http_proxy environment variable configured within your environment, you should add the value of agent-mgmt-hostname to the no_proxy variable to ensure that data is correctly transmitted to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and not redirected through the configured proxy address.

  • --agent-run-os-tests

    Command-Line Format--agent-run-os-tests
    Option-File Formatagent-run-os-tests

    Runs the internal operating system tests, and then exits. Using this option will generate a large body of information about the various operating system information that can be collected about the host. You can use this to determine whether the agent is collecting the right amount, quantity and quality of information to the server.

    A truncated sample of the output is provided below:

    2010-01-22 16:15:45: (critical) MySQL Monitor Agent 2.1.1.1138 started.
    sigar-test-all.c.128 ():
      pid = 1353
    sigar-test-all.c.110 ():
      mem.ram = 6080,
      mem.total = 6374154240,
      mem.used = 3356090368,
      mem.free = 3018063872,
      mem.actual_free = 3018063872,
      mem.actual_used = 3356090368
    sigar-test-all.c.143 ():
      swap.total = 28523896832,
      swap.used = 710623232,
      swap.free = 27813273600
    sigar-test-all.c.169 ():
      cpu.user = 24544920,
      cpu.sys = 136764840,
      cpu.nice = 0,
      cpu.idle = 1234759920,
      cpu.wait = 0,
      cpu.total = 349015500
    sigar-test-all.c.194 ():
    [0]
      cpu.user = 8516770,
      cpu.sys = 56838970,
      cpu.nice = 0,
      cpu.idle = 283667220,
      cpu.wait = 0,
      cpu.total = 349022960
    [1]
      cpu.user = 6130420,
      cpu.sys = 12671090,
      cpu.nice = 0,
    ...
    
  • --agent-sync-attempts

    Command-Line Format--agent-sync-attempts
    Option-File Formatagent-sync-attempts

    Attempt to synchronise with the server during the resynchronization.

  • --basedir

    Command-Line Format--agent-track-alloc
    Option-File Formatagent-track-alloc

    Track the memory allocation in the various modules of the agent to help monitor the memory usage.

  • --basedir

    Command-Line Format--agent-uuid
    Option-File Formatagent-uuid
     Permitted Values
    Typestring

    Specify the agent UUID. A UUID is automatically generated for each agent during installation, with the UUID automatically added to the configuration. You can generate a new UUID using the agent-generate-uuid command line option.

  • --basedir

    Command-Line Format--basedir
    Option-File Formatbasedir
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name

    Specify a base directory that will be prepended to all other filename configuration options. The base name should be an absolute (not relative) directory. If you specify a relative directory, mysql-monitor-agent will generate an error during startup.

  • --defaults-file

    Command-Line Format--defaults-file
    Option-File Formatdefaults-file

    Specify a file to use as the file with configuration information. If not specified, configuration options are only taken from the command line.

  • --event-threads=#

    Command-Line Format--event-threads
    Option-File Formatevent-threads
     Permitted Values
    Typenumeric
    Default1

    Specify the number of event threads reserved to handle incoming requests.

  • --keepalive

    Command-Line Format--keepalive
    Option-File Formatkeepalive

    Creates a process surrounding the main mysql-monitor-agent which will attempt to restart the true mysql-monitor-agent process in thr event a crash or other failure.

  • --log-backtrace-on-crash

    Command-Line Format--log-backtrace-on-crash
    Option-File Formatlog-backtrace-on-crash

    Logs the backtrace to the error log and tries to initialize the debugger in the event of a failure.

  • --log-file=filename

    Command-Line Format--log-file
    Option-File Formatlog-file
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name

    Specify the name of a file to be used to record log information.

  • --log-file=filename

    Command-Line Format--log-level
    Option-File Formatlog-level
     Permitted Values
    Typeenumeration
    Defaultcritical
    Valid ValueserrorShow error messages
     warningShow only warning messages
     infoShow informational messages
     messageShow information about agent and basic processing
     criticalShow critical messages highlighting agent problems
     debugShow detailed information, including info provided to server

    The log level to be used when outputting error messages. The specification will output that level (or lower) of a given error message. For example, message will also output info, warning, and error messages.

  • --log-use-syslog

    Command-Line Format--log-use-syslog
    Option-File Formatlog-use-syslog

    Causes errors to be sent to the syslog (Unix/Linux only).

  • --lua-cpath=path

    Command-Line Format--lua-cpath
    Option-File Formatlua-cpath
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name

    Specify the LUA_CPATH to be used when loading compiled modules or libraries for Lua scripts.

  • --lua-path=path

    Command-Line Format--lua-path
    Option-File Formatlua-path
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name

    Specify the LUA_CPATH to be used when loading modules for Lua.

  • --max-open-files=#

    Command-Line Format--max-open-files
    Option-File Formatmax-open-files
     Permitted Values
    Typenumeric

    The maximum number of open files and sockets supported by the mysql-monitor-agent process. You may need to increase this with certain scripts.

  • --monitor-interval=#

    Command-Line Format--monitor-interval
    Option-File Formatmonitor-interval
     Permitted Values
    Typenumeric
    Default1
    Min Value1

    Execute queries against the backends at this interval. The default is 1.

  • --monitor-lua-script=SCRIPT

    Command-Line Format--monitor-lua-script
    Option-File Formatmonitor-lua-script
     Permitted Values
    Typestring

    Filename of the Lua script to use for the monitor module.

  • --monitor-password=PASS

    Command-Line Format--monitor-password
    Option-File Formatmonitor-password
     Permitted Values
    Typestring

    The password for the monitoring user account.

  • --monitor-username=USER

    Command-Line Format--monitor-username
    Option-File Formatmonitor-username
     Permitted Values
    Typestring
    Defaultmonitor

    The username for the monitoring user account.

  • --no-proxy

    Command-Line Format--no-proxy
    Option-File Formatno-proxy

    Disable the proxy module.

  • --plugin-dir=path

    Command-Line Format--plugin-dir
    Option-File Formatplugin-dir
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name

    The directory to use when loading plugins for mysql-monitor-agent.

  • --plugins=plugin,...

    Command-Line Format--plugins
    Option-File Formatplugins
     Permitted Values
    Typestring

    A comma-separated list of the plugins to be loaded.

  • --proxy-address=host:port

    Command-Line Format--proxy-address
    -P
    Option-File Formatproxy-address
     Permitted Values (>= 2.1.0)
    Typestring
    Default:6446

    The listening host name (or IP address) and port of the proxy server. The default is :6446 (all IPs on port 6446).

  • --proxy-read-only-backend-addresses=host:port

    Command-Line Format--proxy-read-only-backend-addresses
    -r
    Option-File Formatproxy-read-only-backend-addresses
     Permitted Values
    Typestring

    The listening host name (or IP address) and port of the proxy server for read-only connections. The default is for this information not to be set.

  • --proxy-backend-addresses=host:port

    The host name (or IP address) and port of the MySQL server to connect to. You can specify multiple backend servers by supplying multiple options. Clients are connected to each backend server in round-robin fashion. For example, if you specify two servers A and B, the first client connection will go to server A; the second client connection to server B and the third client connection to server A.

  • --proxy-pool-no-change-user

    Command-Line Format--proxy-pool-no-change-user
    Option-File Formatproxy-pool-no-change-user

    Disables the use of the MySQL protocol CHANGE_USER when reusing a connection from the pool of connections specified by the backend-addresses list.

  • --proxy-skip-profiling

    disables profiling of queries (tracking time statistics). The default is for tracking to be enabled.

  • --proxy-fix-bug-25371

    Command-Line Format--proxy-fix-bug-25371
    Option-File Formatproxy-fix-bug-25371

    Gets round an issue when connecting to a MySQL server later than 5.1.12 when using a MySQL client library of any earlier version.

  • --proxy-lua-script=file

    Command-Line Format--proxy-lua-script
    -s
    Option-File Formatproxy-lua-script
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name

    specify the Lua script file to be loaded. Note that the script file is not physically loaded and parsed until a connection is made. Also note that the specified Lua script is reloaded for each connection; if the content of the Lua script changes while mysql-monitor-agent is running then the updated content will automatically be used when a new connection is made.

  • --daemon

    Command-Line Format--daemon
    Option-File Formatdaemon

    Starts the proxy in daemon mode.

  • --pid-file=file

    Command-Line Format--pid-file
    Option-File Formatpid-file
     Permitted Values
    Typefile name

    Sets the name of the file to be used to store the process ID.

  • --user=user

    Command-Line Format--user
    Option-File Formatuser
     Permitted Values
    Typestring

    Run mysql-monitor-agent as the specified user.

  • --version

    Command-Line Format--version
    -V
    Option-File Formatversion

    Show the version number.

15.12.7. Configuring Tomcat Parameters

The parameters for the Tomcat hosting system used to support MySQL Enterprise Service Manager and MySQL Enterprise Dashboard can have an affect on the performance of the system.

The default settings for Java for Tomcat are as follows:

Initial heap size-Xms768MB
Maximum heap size-Xmx768MB
Java stack size-Xss128MB

You can change these parameters to higher values,by editing the JAVA_OPTS setting within the corresponding platform script.

  • On Unix/Linux and Mac OS X

    Edit the values within apache-tomcat/bin/setenv.sh file within your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager directory. You should avoid setting maximum figures higher than the physical memory of your system as this may reduce, rather than increase the performace.

    If you change these parameters, you will need to shutdown and restart MySQL Enterprise Service Manager for the changes to take effect.

  • Windows

    Edit the JAVA_OPTS settings within the apache-tomcat/bin/setenv.bat file.

    To enable the changes, you must re-install your service. To do this, shutdown your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager service and then reinstall the service by running:

    shell> mysqlmonitorctl.bat uninstall
    shell> mysqlmonitorctl.bat install
    

On all platforms, changes to the JAVA_OPTS using the above methods should be retained over an upgrade of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager service.

If you change these parameters, you must restart MySQL Enterprise Service Manager for the changes to take effect.

15.12.8. Backing up MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

If you want to backup the data stored within your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager, you can use any of the typical backup solutions, such as mysqldump, to save your data. All you need to backup the information is host name, user name and password details that were set during the installation of the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager

You can locate this information by examining the contents of the configuration_report.txt file that was generated when MySQL Enterprise Service Manager was installed. A scample of the file is provided below:

MySQL Enterprise Monitor (Version 2.0.0.7088 : 20081031_152749_r7088)
Here are the settings you specified:
Application hostname and port: http://127.0.0.1:18080
Tomcat Ports: 18080 - 18443 (SSL)
MySQL Port : 13306
Repository Credentials (bundled MySQL):
---------------------------------------
service_manager/Password
Use the following command to login to the MySQL Enterprise Monitor database:
mysql -uservice_manager -pPassword -P13306 -h127.0.0.1

The last line provides the information about how to connect to the server using the standard mysql command line client.

All the MySQL Enterprise Monitor repository information, including your configuration, rule and historical data is stored within the mem database.

To backup this information using mysqldump you might use the following command:

shell> mysqldump --single-transaction »
-uservice_manager -pPassword -P13306 -h127.0.0.1 mem >mem.dump

The above command would create a file, mem.dump, containing all of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor data.

To ensure consistency in a recovery situation, you may also want to backup the agent configuration and metadata stored on each monitored MySQL server. To do this:

  • Backup the configuration files of each agent. You should keep a copy of the etc directory for each agent. This directory contains the main configuration file, mysql-monitor-agent.ini, and the configuration information for each server being monitored, which is stored within the etc/instances directory.

  • On each server being monitored, retain a copy of the mysql.inventory table, which contains the unique ID of the MySQL server.

15.12.9. Migrating 1.3.x Historical Data to MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0

You can migrate the data generated during a MySQL Enterprise Monitor 1.3.x installation using the Data Migration functionality of the Server Configuration panel.

To use the data migration feature, you must have installed MySQL Enterprise Service Manager using an update installer. The update installer performs the initial migration of your configuration, rules, schedule, and events data. The historical data is not migrated until you explicitly request the migration of information within the Manage Servers section of the Settings panel.

Data migration works on a single server, allowing you to select on which servers you want to migrate information. The migration is subject to the following:

  • You must elect to migrate the data from each server individually.

  • Migration takes approximately 5-6 hours, for each month, for each server. Therefore, if you have six months of data on 10 servers it could take between 300 and 360 hours (15 days) to migrate all of your historical data one server at a time.

  • To limit the data migration, set the Data Purge Behavior within the Settings page. Only data more recent than the specified purge period will be migrated. Data older than the purge period will be ignored.

  • To prevent performance issues, migrate only one or a small number of servers concurrently.

  • You can start and stop the migration of the data at any time. As a general guide, you should avoid stopping the data migration process and allow it to complete unless:

    • Run out of disk space.

    • MySQL Enterprise Service Manager becomes too slow and unresponsive.

    • Migration never completes.

    With the last item, where the migration never completes, occasionally there are some aspects of the data that cannot be migrated successfully. This will prevent the migration process completing, but does not affect the conversion of any data that could be migrated.

Starting Historical Data Migration

To start data migration:

  • Switch to the Manage Servers display of the Settings panel within MySQL Enterprise Dashboard.

  • Ensure that the data migration functionality has been enabled. The Start and Stop buttons next to Historical Data Migration will be visible.

    Figure 15.54. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Historical Data Migration Availability

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Historical
              Data Migration Availability
  • Select the servers you want to migrate by using the checkbox next to each server name. You can select one or more servers to migrate. Servers that are suitable for migration will show their migration status within the Migration Status columnn. If the server is not able to be migrated, N/A will be shown.

  • Click Start next to Historical Data Migration.

  • You will be presented with a confirmation dialog box. To start the migration, click start migration. To cancel migration, click cancel.

  • The servers that have been selected for migration will show Queued for Migration in the Migration Status column.

    Figure 15.55. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Confirming Historical Data Migration

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Confirming
              Historical Data Migration

Monitoring Historical Data Migration

You can check the migration status of any individual server by examining the Migration Status column for each server. You can see an example of the migration status below.

Figure 15.56. MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Historical Data Migration Progress

MySQL Enterprise Monitor: Historical Data
          Migration Progress

Note that the migration status is shown according to the state of migration at the time the page was loaded. The actual migration continues in the background, and the current state may not match the state of the migration at the time it is viewed.

Servers showing Done in the Migration Status column have already completed their migration.

You can check the overall migration status by examining the Upgrade Status display.

Stopping Historical Data Migration

You can stop the migration process for any server that is still migrating data. The migration can be restarted at any time without causing any problems.

To stop the historical data migration:

  1. Select the servers you want to stop migrating by using the checkbox next to each server name. You can select one or more servers to stop migrating.

  2. Click Stop next to Historical Data Migration.

Confirmation that the migration has been stopped will be provided. If migration has already completed, you will be notified.

Removing Old Data

Once data migration has been completed for all the servers you want to migrate, you may want to delete or remove access to the old data within your MySQL Enterprise Monitor repository. Data for MySQL Enterprise Monitor 1.3 was stored in a database called merlin within the MySQL repository. Data for MySQL Enterprise Monitor 2.0 is stored within a database called mem.

To create a backup of the old information, use mysqldump:

shell> mysqldump -uservice_manager -pPassword -P13306 -h127.0.0.1 merlin >data-1.3.sql

The above will create a file, data-1.3.sql containg all of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor 1.3 information.

If you remove access to the old data, then the data migration options for old servers will be removed from the Manage Servers panel within MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. To remove access, you need to REVOKE access to the merlin database:

mysql& REVOKE ALL on merlin.* FROM 'service_manager';

Note that revoking access to the old data will not reclaim any of the disk space used by the old data.

To delete the data from the database and free up the space being used by the historical information, DROP the merlin database:

mysql& DROP DATABASE merlin;

Once all the data has been migrated you can hide the migration user interface by clicking the hide migration interface button.

15.12.10. Regular MySQL Enterprise Monitor Maintenance

MySQL Enterprise Monitor is generally self managing and does not need excessive maintenance. You should, however, be aware of certain maintenance tasks that you can automate or will need to manually perform to keep your MySQL Enterprise Monitor running efficiently.

  • Make sure you have set the purge interval for your data to an appropriate value according to duration and history of data that you want to keep. For more information, see Data Purge Behavior.

  • Check, and delete, the contents of the temporary directory with your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation directory.

15.12.11. Advisor/Graph Reference

Basic

Silver

Gold

Platinum

15.12.11.1. Advisors

Individual Advisor information is show below.

  • 32-Bit Binary Running on 64-Bit AMD Or Intel System

    The chip architecture and operating system installed on a machine both impact the performance of software running on the system. While it is possible to run 32-bit software on many 64-bit systems, in general, software built to run on a 64-bit system will run better on such a system than software built to run on a 32-bit system.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Account Has An Overly Broad Host Specifier

    The MySQL server has user accounts with overly broad host specifiers. A MySQL account is identified by both a username and a hostname, which are found in the User and Host columns of the mysql.user table. The User value is the name that a client must supply when connecting to the server. The Host value indicates the host or hosts from which the user is allowed to connect. If this is a literal hostname, the account is limited to connections only from that host. If the hostname contains the '%' wildcard character, the user can connect from any host that matches the wildcard character and potentially from any host at all.

    From a security standpoint, literal host values are best and % is worst. Accounts that have Host values containing wildcards are more susceptible to attack than accounts with literal host values, because attackers can attempt to connect from a broader range of machines.

    For example, if an account has user and host values of root and % , it means that you can connect as the root user from any machine if you know the password. By contrast, if the host name is localhost or 127.0.0.1, the attacker can only attempt to connect as the root user from the server host.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Account Has Global Privileges

    A MySQL server may have user accounts with privileges on all databases and tables (*.*). In most cases global privileges should be allowed only for the MySQL root user, and possibly for users that you trust or use for backup purposes. Global privileges such as DROP, ALTER, DELETE, UPDATE, INSERT, and LOCK TABLES may be dangerous as they may cause other users to be affected adversely.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Account Has Old Insecure Password Hash

    Prior to MySQL 4.1, password hashes computed by the PASSWORD() function were 16 bytes long. As of MySQL 4.1 (and later), PASSWORD() was modified to produce a longer 41-byte hash value to provide enhanced security.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Account Has Strong MySQL Privileges

    Certain account privileges can be dangerous and should only be granted to trusted users when necessary. For example, the FILE privilege allows a user to read and write files on the database server (which includes sensitive operating system files), the PROCESS privilege allows currently executing statements to be monitored, and the SHUTDOWN privilege allows a user to shut down the server. In addition, the GRANT privilege allows a user to grant privileges to others.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Agent Host Time Out of Sync Relative to Dashboard

    To maintain data consistency and to facilitate day-to-day system management operations, which often require comparing logs, files, and timestamps across servers, it is important that the server clocks across all your systems and data centers be synchronized with respect to each other relative to UTC time (which takes timezones into account). When the clock on one server is minutes or hours behind another server, any timestamps created in the databases or on the file systems of those two servers will differ by that amount. Thus if you depend on timestamps to test the freshness of some data item, or if you are trying to diagnose a problem and need to compare timestamps across systems, your task will be more complicated due to this time difference.

    In addition, the data and graphs shown in the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Dashboard will be skewed by the difference in time between the machine hosting the Service Manager and the machines running the Agents. For example, if the time on an Agent machine is one hour behind the time on the Service Manager machine, the MySQL server that Agent is monitoring will appear to be down (see Bug#45937) and no data will appear in the graphs for that server for the first hour after the Agent is started.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Attempted Connections To The Server Have Failed

    Aborted connection attempts to MySQL may indicate an issue with respect to the server or network, or could be indicative of DoS or password-cracking attempts against the MySQL Server. The aborted-connects count is incremented when:

    • A client does not have privileges to access a database

    • A client uses the wrong password

    • A malformed packet is received

    • The connect_timeout variable is exceeded

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • AUTO_INCREMENT Field Limit Nearly Reached

    Many applications need to generate unique numbers and sequences for identification purposes (e.g. customer IDs, bug or trouble ticket tags, membership or order numbers, etc). MySQL's mechanism for doing this is the AUTO_INCREMENT column attribute, which enables you to generate sequential numbers automatically.

    However, the range of numbers that can be generated is limited by the underlying data type. For example, the maximum value possible for a TINYINT UNSIGNED column is 255. If you try to generate a number that exceeds the maximum allowed by the underlying data type (e.g. by inserting a NULL value into the AUTO_INCREMENT column), you will trigger database errors and your application may not behave properly.

    Note that the primary purpose of AUTO_INCREMENT in MySQL is to generate a sequence of positive integers. The use of non-positive numbers in in an AUTO_INCREMENT column is unsupported, so you may as well define those columns to be UNSIGNED, which effectively doubles their allowable range.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Binary Log File Count Exceeds Specified Limit

    The binary log captures DML, DDL, and security changes that occur and stores these changes in a binary format. The binary log enables replication as well as point-in-time recovery, preventing data loss during a disaster recovery situation. It also enables you to review all alterations made to your database. However, binary logs consume disk space and file system resources, and can be removed from a production server after they are no longer needed by the slaves connecting to this master server, and after they have been backed up.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Binary Log Space Exceeds Specified Limit

    The binary log captures DML, DDL, and security changes that occur and stores these changes in a binary format. The binary log enables replication as well as point-in-time recovery, preventing data loss during a disaster recovery situation. It also enables you to review all alterations made to your database. However, binary logs consume disk space and can be removed from a production server after they are no longer needed by the slaves connecting to this master server, and after they have been backed up.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Binary Log Usage Exceeding Disk Cache Memory Limits

    When binary log usage exceeds the binary log cache memory limits, it is performing excessive disk operations. For optimal performance, transactions that move through the binary log should be contained within the binary log cache.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Binary Logging Is Limited

    The binary log captures DML, DDL, and security changes that occur and stores these changes in a binary format. The binary log enables point-in-time recovery, preventing data loss during a disaster recovery situation. It also enables you to review all alterations made to your database.

    Binary logging can be limited to specific databases with the --binlog-do-db and the --binlog-ignore-db options. However, if these options are used, your point-in-time recovery options are limited accordingly, along with your ability to review alterations made to your system.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Binary Logging Not Enabled

    The binary log captures DML, DDL, and security changes that occur and stores these changes in a binary format. The binary log enables point-in-time recovery, preventing data loss during a disaster recovery situation. It also enables you to review all alterations made to your database.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Binary Logging Not Synchronized To Disk At Each Write

    By default, the binary log is not synchronized to disk at each write. If the server host, operating system, or MySQL server crash, there is a chance that the latest statements in the binary log are not written to disk. To prevent this, you can cause the binary log to be synchronized to disk after every Nth binary log entry using the sync_binlog global variable. 1 is the safest value, but also the slowest.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Connection Usage Excessive

    Once the maximum connection limit for the MySQL server has been reached, no other user connections can be established and errors occur on the client side of the application.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • CPU I/O Usage Excessive

    CPU I/O usage should be low on a properly configured and well-tuned system. Excessive CPU I/O usage is often indicative of poor disk or network performance.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • CPU Usage Excessive

    CPU usage should be low-to-moderate on a properly configured and well-tuned system. Excessive CPU usage can be indicative of many problems: insufficient RAM, fragmented disks, poorly-tuned queries, etc.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • CREATE TABLE LIKE Does Not Require Any Privileges On Source Table

    Due to Bug#25578, a user who does not have any access to a database can still clone the structure of tables in that database. Knowing the structure of tables in a database may give a determined hacker insight that allows him or her to proceed with other exploits.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Data Flushed To Disk After Each SQL Statement

    MySQL updates its data files on disk with the write() system call after every SQL statement and lets the operating system handle the synchronizing to disk. You can force MySQL to flush everything to disk after every SQL statement with the --flush option, however, this will have an adverse effect on performance.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Database May Not Be Portable Due To Identifier Case Sensitivity

    The case sensitivity of the underlying operating system determines the case sensitivity of database and table names. If you are using MySQL on only one platform, you don't normally have to worry about this. However, depending on how you have configured your server you may encounter difficulties if you want to transfer tables between platforms that differ in filesystem case sensitivity.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Date-Handling Bugs Can Crash The Server

    Two bugs related to date-handling operations can crash the server leading to potential Denial of Service (DoS) attacks:

    • STR_TO_DATE(1,NULL) caused a server crash (Bug#15828);

    • Invalid arguments to DATE_FORMAT() caused a server crash (Bug#20729).

      These bugs have been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Default Value Being Used For max_prepared_stmt_count

    Prepared statements may increase performance in applications that execute similar statements more than once, primarily because the query is parsed only once. Prepared statements can also reduce network traffic because it is only necessary to send the data for the parameters for each execution rather than the whole statement.

    However, prepared statements consume memory in the MySQL server until they are closed, so it is important to use them properly and to limit the number of statements that can be open at any one time. The default value for max_prepared_stmt_count may not be appropriate for your application and environment.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Disabling Next-Key Locking In InnoDB Can Crash The Server

    Due to several bugs, the server could crash if next-key locking in InnoDB was disabled.

    These bugs have been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Event Scheduler Disabled

    The Event Scheduler is a very useful feature when enabled. It is a framework for executing SQL commands at specific times or at regular intervals. Conceptually, it is similar to the idea of the Unix crontab (also known as a "cron job") or the Windows Task Scheduler.

    The basics of its architecture are simple. An event is a stored routine with a starting date and time, and a recurring tag. Once defined and activated, it will run when requested. Unlike triggers, events are not linked to specific table operations, but to dates and times. Using the event scheduler, the database administrator can perform recurring events with minimal hassle. Common uses are the cleanup of obsolete data, the creation of summary tables for statistics, and monitoring of server performance and usage.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Excessive Disk Temporary Table Usage Detected

    If the space required to build a temporary table exceeds either tmp_table_size or max_heap_table_size, MySQL creates a disk-based table in the server's tmpdir directory. Also, tables that have TEXT or BLOB columns are automatically placed on disk.

    For performance reasons it is ideal to have most temporary tables created in memory, leaving exceedingly large temporary tables to be created on disk.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Excessive Number of Locked Processes

    Depending on the circumstances, storage engines, and other factors, one process may be using or accessing a resource (e.g. a table or row) required by another process in such a way that the second process cannot proceed until the first process releases the resource. In this case the second process is in a "locked" state until the resource is released. If many processes are in a locked state it may be a sign of serious trouble related to resource contention, or a long running session that is not releasing currently held locks when it should have.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Excessive Number of Long Running Processes

    Most applications and databases are designed to execute queries very quickly. If many queries are taking a long time to execute (e.g. more than a few seconds) it can be a sign of trouble. In such cases queries may need to be tuned or rewritten, or indexes added to improve performance. In other cases the database schema may have to be redesigned.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Excessive Number of Long Running Processes Locked

    Most applications and databases are designed to execute queries very quickly, and to avoid resource contention where one query is waiting for another to release a lock on some shared resource. If many queries are locked and taking a long time to execute (e.g. more than a few seconds), it can be a sign of performance trouble and resource contention. In such cases queries may need to be tuned or rewritten, or indexes added to improve performance. In other cases the database schema may have to be redesigned.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Excessive Percentage Of Attempted Connections To The Server Have Failed

    Excess aborted connection attempts to MySQL may indicate an issue with respect to the server or network, or could be indicative of DoS or password-cracking attempts against the MySQL Server. The aborted-connects count is incremented when:

    • A client does not have privileges to access a database

    • A client uses the wrong password

    • A malformed packet is received

    • The connect_timeout variable is exceeded

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Flush Time Set To Non-Zero Value

    If flush_time is set to a non-zero value, all tables are closed every flush_time seconds to free up resources and synchronize unflushed data to disk. If your system is unreliable and tends to lock up or restart often, forcing out table changes this way degrades performance but can reduce the chance of table corruption or data loss. We recommend that this option be used only on Windows, or on systems with minimal resources.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • General Query Log Enabled

    The general query log is a general record of what mysqld is doing. The server writes information to this log when clients connect or disconnect, and it logs each SQL statement received from clients. The general query log can be very useful when you suspect an error in a client and want to know exactly what the client sent to mysqld.

    However, the general query log should not be enabled in production environments because:

    • It adds overhead to the server;

    • It logs statements in the order they were received, not the order they were executed, so it is not reliable for backup/recovery;

    • It grows fast and can use a lot of disk space;

    • You cannot stop logging to the general query log without stopping the server (for versions previous to 5.1).

      You should use the binary log instead.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Improper key_cache_block_size Setting Can Corrupt MyISAM Tables

    The server deducts some bytes from the key_cache_block_size option value and reduces it to the next lower 512 byte boundary. The resulting block size is not a power of two. Setting the key_cache_block_size system variable to a value that is not a power of two results in MyISAM table corruption.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • In-Memory Temporary Table Size Limited By Maximum Heap Table Size

    If the space required to build a temporary table exceeds either tmp_table_size or max_heap_table_size, MySQL creates a disk-based table in the server's tmpdir directory. For performance reasons it is ideal to have most temporary tables created in memory, leaving exceedingly large temporary tables to be created on disk. Many DBAs configure tmp_table_size appropriately, but forget that max_heap_table_size also plays a role.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Incorrect InnoDB Flush Method On Windows Using MySQL Version 4.1.9

    If innodb_file_per_table is enabled and innodb_flush_method is not set to unbuffered on Windows when using MySQL Server version 4.1.9, MySQL may not start and you may see operating system error code 87.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Indexes Not Being Used Efficiently

    The target server does not appear to be using indexes efficiently. The values of Handler_read_rnd_next and Handler_read_rnd together - which reflect the number of rows read via full table scans - are high compared to the Handler variables which denote index accesses - such as Handler_read_key, Handler_read_next etc. You should examine your tables and queries for proper use of indexes.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • InnoDB Buffer Cache Has Sub-Optimal Hit Rate

    Logical I/O is many times faster than physical I/O, and therefore a DBA should strive to keep physical I/O to a minimum. It is true that logical I/O is not free, and that the DBA should work to keep all I/O to a minimum, but it is best if most data access is performed in memory. When using InnoDB, most data access should occur in RAM, and therefore the InnoDB buffer cache hit rate should be high.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • InnoDB Buffer Pool Writes May Be Performance Bottleneck

    For optimal performance, InnoDB should not have to wait before writing pages into the InnoDB buffer pool.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • InnoDB Doublewrite Buffer Enabled

    InnoDB uses a novel file flush technique called doublewrite. It adds safety to recovery following an operating system crash or a power outage, and improves performance on most varieties of Unix by reducing the need for fsync() operations.

    Doublewrite means that before writing pages to a data file, InnoDB first writes them to a contiguous tablespace area called the doublewrite buffer. Only after the write and the flush to the doublewrite buffer has completed does InnoDB write the pages to their proper positions in the data file. If the operating system crashes in the middle of a page write, during recovery InnoDB can find a good copy of the page from the doublewrite buffer.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • InnoDB Flush Method May Not Be Optimal

    Different values for innodb_flush_method can have a marked effect on InnoDB performance. In some versions of GNU/Linux and Unix, flushing files to disk by invoking fsync() (which InnoDB uses by default) or other similar methods, can be surprisingly slow. If you are dissatisfied with database write performance, you might try setting the innodb_flush_method parameter to O_DIRECT or O_DSYNC.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • InnoDB Log Buffer Flushed To Disk After Each Transaction

    By default, InnoDB's log buffer is written out to the log file at each transaction commit and a flush-to-disk operation is performed on the log file, which enforces ACID compliance. In the event of a crash, if you can afford to lose a second's worth of transactions, you can achieve better performance by setting innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit to either 0 or 2. If you set the value to 2, then only an operating system crash or a power outage can erase the last second of transactions. This can be very useful on slave servers, where the loss of a second's worth of data can be recovered from the master server if needed.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • InnoDB Log Waits May Be Performance Bottleneck

    For optimal performance, InnoDB should not have to wait before writing DML activity to the InnoDB log buffer.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • InnoDB Tablespace Cannot Automatically Expand

    If the InnoDB tablespace is not allowed to automatically grow to meet incoming data demands and your application generates more data than there is room for, out-of-space errors will occur and your application may experience problems.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • InnoDB Transaction Logs Not Sized Correctly

    To avoid frequent checkpoint activity and reduce overall physical I/O, which can slow down write-heavy systems, the InnoDB transaction logs should be approximately 50-100% of the size of the InnoDB buffer pool, depending on the size of the buffer pool.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Insecure Password Authentication Option Is Enabled

    Prior to MySQL 4.1, password hashes computed by the PASSWORD() function were 16 bytes long. As of MySQL 4.1 (and later), PASSWORD() was modified to produce a longer 41-byte hash value to provide enhanced security. However, in order to allow backward-compatibility with user tables that have been migrated from pre-4.1 systems, you can configure MySQL to accept logins for accounts that have password hashes created using the old, less-secure PASSWORD() function, but this is not recommended.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Insecure Password Generation Option Is Enabled

    Prior to MySQL 4.1, password hashes computed by the PASSWORD() function were 16 bytes long. As of MySQL 4.1 (and later), PASSWORD() was modified to produce a longer 41-byte hash value to provide enhanced security. In order to allow backward-compatibility with older client programs, you can configure MySQL to generate short (pre-4.1) password hashes for new passwords, however, this is not recommended.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • INSERT ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE Bug May Break Replication

    For INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE statements where some AUTO_INCREMENT values were generated automatically for inserts and some rows were updated, one auto-generated value was lost per updated row, leading to faster exhaustion of the range of the AUTO_INCREMENT column. Affected versions of MySQL include 5.0.24 to 5.0.34, and 5.1.12 to 5.1.17 (inclusive).

    Because the original problem can affect replication (different values on master and slave), it is recommended that the master and its slaves be upgraded to the current version.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Key Buffer Size Greater Than 4 GB

    To minimize disk I/O, the MyISAM storage engine employs a key cache (or key buffer) to keep the most frequently accessed index blocks in memory. However, prior to MySQL version 5.0.52 this key buffer is limited in size to 4 GB, even on 64-bit operating systems. If set to a larger value, mysqld may crash when it tries to increase the actual buffer beyond 4 GB. Note that key_buffer_size is limited to 4GB on both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows systems, even in MySQL version 5.0.52 and later.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Key Buffer Size May Not Be Optimal For Key Cache

    The key cache hit ratio represents the proportion of keys that are being read from the key cache in memory instead of from disk. This should normally be greater than 99% for optimum efficiency.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Key Buffer Size May Not Be Optimal For System RAM

    The target server does not appear to have sufficient memory devoted to the key cache. On a dedicated server, this cache is commonly about 25%-50% of total RAM.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • LOCAL Option Of LOAD DATA Statement Is Enabled

    The LOAD DATA statement can load a file that is located on the server host, or it can load a file that is located on the client host when the LOCAL keyword is specified.

    There are two potential security issues with supporting the LOCAL version of LOAD DATA statements:

    • The transfer of the file from the client host to the server host is initiated by the MySQL server. In theory, a patched server could be built that would tell the client program to transfer a file of the server's choosing rather than the file named by the client in the LOAD DATA statement. Such a server could access any file on the client host to which the client user has read access.

    • In a Web environment where the clients are connecting from a separate web server, a user could use LOAD DATA LOCAL to read any files that the web server process has read access to (assuming that a user could run any statement against the SQL server). In this environment, the client with respect to the MySQL server actually is the web server, not the remote program being run by the user who connects to the web server.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Lock Contention Excessive

    Performance can be degraded if the percentage of table operations that have to wait for a lock is high compared to the overall number of lock requests. This can happen when using a table-level locking storage engine, such as MyISAM, instead of a row-level locking storage engine.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Malformed Password Packet In Connection Protocol Can Crash Server

    Due to Bug#28984, a malformed password packet in the connection protocol could cause the server to crash. This can lead to denial of service (DoS) attacks.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Maximum Connection Limit Nearing Or Reached

    Once the maximum connection limit for the MySQL server has been reached, no other user connections can be established and errors occur on the client side of the application.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Missing Security Improvements In GRANT Options

    The GRANT statement is used to create MySQL user accounts and to grant rights to accounts. Due to bugs 15756 and 14385, rights may be granted erroneously in certain circumstances:

    • In grant table comparisons, improper use of a latin1 collation caused some hostname matches to be true that should have been false (Bug#15756).

    • GRANTs to users with wildcards in their host information could be erroneously applied to similar users with the same username and similar wildcards. For example, a privilege granted to [email protected]% is also applied to user [email protected]% (Bug#14385).

      These bugs have been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Multi-Byte Encoding Processing Can Lead To SQL Injection

    Due to bug 8378, the server incorrectly parsed strings escaped with the mysql_real_escape_string() C API function. As a result, even when the character set-aware mysql_real_escape_string() function was used, SQL injection was possible.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Multiple Threads Used When Repairing MyISAM Tables

    Using multiple threads when repairing MyISAM tables can improve performance, but it can also lead to table and index corruption as reported by several bugs (#11527, #11684, #18874). Even though these bugs have been fixed, this feature is still considered beta-quality, as noted in the manual.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • MyISAM Concurrent Insert Setting May Not Be Optimal

    MyISAM uses table-level locking, which can adversely affect performance when there are many concurrent INSERT and SELECT statements because INSERTs will block all SELECTs until the INSERT is completed. However, MyISAM can be configured to allow INSERT and SELECT statements to run concurrently in certain situations.

    • If concurrent_insert is set to 1 (the default), MySQL allows INSERT and SELECT statements to run concurrently for MyISAM tables that have no free blocks in the middle of the data file.

    • If concurrent_insert is set to 2 (available in MySQL 5.0.6 and later), MySQL allows concurrent inserts for all MyISAM tables, even those that have holes. For a table with a hole, new rows are inserted at the end of the table if it is in use by another thread. Otherwise, MySQL acquires a normal write lock and inserts the row into the hole.

      Note that setting concurrent_insert to 2 allows tables to grow even when there are holes in the middle. This can be bad for applications that delete large chunks of data but continue to issue many SELECTs, thus effectively preventing INSERTs from filling the holes.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • MyISAM Indexes Found with No Statistics

    The MySQL optimizer needs index statistics to help make choices about whether to use indexes to satisfy SQL queries. Having no statistics or outdated statistics limits the optimizer's ability to make smart and informed access plan choices.

    Default frequency 12:00:00

  • MyISAM Key Cache Has Sub-Optimal Hit Rate

    The key cache hit ratio represents the proportion of index values that are being read from the key cache in memory instead of from disk. This should normally be greater than 99% for optimum efficiency.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • MySQL Agent Memory Usage Excessive

    The memory needed by the MySQL Agent for basic monitoring is fairly small and consistent, and depends on the number of rules you have enabled. However, when the Query Analyzer is enabled, the Agent can use significantly more memory to monitor and analyze whatever queries you direct through it. In this case, the amount of memory used depends on the number of unique normalized queries, example queries and example explains being processed, plus the network bandwidth required to send query data to the Service Manager. In general, the amount of memory used for the Query Analyzer is small and well-bounded, but under some circumstances it can become excessive, especially on older versions of Linux.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • MySQL Agent Not Communicating With Database Server

    The MySQL Enterprise Service Agent must be able to communicate with the local MySQL database server in order to monitor the server and provide advice on enforcement of best practices.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • MySQL Agent Not Reachable

    In order to monitor a MySQL server, a Service Agent must be running and communicating with the Service Manager. If the Agent cannot communicate with the Service Manager, the Service Manager has no way of knowing if the MySQL database server being monitored is running, and it cannot collect current statistics to properly evaluate the rules scheduled against that server.

    Default frequency 00:00:01

  • MySQL Server Has Been Restarted

    To perform useful work, a database server must be up-and-running continuously. It is normal for a production server to run continuously for weeks, months, or longer. If a server has been restarted recently, it may be the result of planned maintenance, but it may also be due to an unplanned event that should be investigated.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • MySQL Server Not Reachable

    To perform useful work, it must be possible to connect to the local MySQL database server. If the MySQL Enterprise Service Agent cannot communicate with the server, it is likely the server is not running.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Next-Key Locking Disabled For InnoDB But Binary Logging Enabled

    Next-key locking in InnoDB can be disabled, which may improve performance in some situations. However, this may result in inconsistent data when recovering from the binary logs in replication or recovery situations. Starting from MySQL 5.0.2, this option is even more unsafe than it was in version 4.1.x.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • No Limit On Total Number Of Prepared Statements

    Due to Bug#16365, there is no limit to the number of prepared statements that can be open per connection. This can lead to a Denial Of Service (DoS) attack, as the server will crash with out-of-memory (OOM) errors when the amount of statements becomes very large.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • No Value Set For myisam-recover

    The myisam-recover option enables automatic MyISAM crash recovery should a MyISAM table become corrupt for some reason. If this option is not set, then a table will be "Marked as crashed" if it becomes corrupt, and no sessions will be able to SELECT from it, or perform any sort of DML against it.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Non-Authorized User Has DB, Table, Or Index Privileges On All Databases

    Privileges such as SELECT, INSERT, ALTER, and so forth allow a user to view and change data, as well as impact system performance. Such operations should be limited to only those databases to which a user truly needs such access so the user cannot inadvertently affect other people's applications and data stores.

    Default frequency 01:00:00

  • Non-Authorized User Has GRANT Privileges On All Databases

    The GRANT privilege, when given on all databases as opposed to being limited to a few specific databases, enables a user to give to other users those privileges that the grantor possesses on all databases. It can be used for databases, tables, and stored routines. Such a privilege should be limited to as few users as possible. Users who do indeed need the GRANT privilege should have that privilege limited to only those databases they are responsible for, and not for all databases.

    Default frequency 01:00:00

  • Non-Authorized User Has Server Admin Privileges

    Certain privileges, such as SHUTDOWN and SUPER, are primarily used for server administration. Some of these privileges can have a dramatic effect on a system because they allow someone to shutdown the server or kill running processes. Such operations should be limited to a small set of users.

    Default frequency 01:00:00

  • Object Changed: Database Has Been Altered

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Database Has Been Created

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Database Has Been Dropped

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Function Has Been Created

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Function Has Been Dropped

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures or functions and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Index Has Been Created

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Index Has Been Dropped

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Table Has Been Altered

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Table Has Been Created

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: Table Has Been Dropped

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when changes occur in a production environment with respect to database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changed: User Has Been Dropped

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when changes occur in a production environment with respect to database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Object Changes Detected

    For development environments, changes to databases and objects may be a normal occurrence, but not for production environments. It is wise to know when any changes occur in a production environment with respect to any database structures and investigate the reasons for the changes.

    Default frequency 00:10:00

  • Prepared Statements Not Being Closed

    Prepared statements may increase performance in applications that execute similar statements more than once, primarily because the query is parsed only once. Prepared statements can also reduce network traffic because it is only necessary to send the data for the parameters for each execution rather than the whole statement.

    However, prepared statements take time to prepare and consume memory in the MySQL server until they are closed, so it is important to use them properly. If you are not closing prepared statements when you are done with them, you are needlessly tying up memory that could be put to use in other ways.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Prepared Statements Not Being Used Effectively

    Prepared statements may increase performance in applications that execute similar statements more than once, primarily because the query is parsed only once. Prepared statements can also reduce network traffic because it is only necessary to send the data for the parameters for each execution rather than the whole statement.

    However, prepared statements take time to prepare and consume memory in the MySQL server until they are closed, so it is important to use them properly. If you are only executing a statement a few times, the overhead of creating a prepared statement may not be worthwhile.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Query Cache Has Sub-Optimal Hit Rate

    When enabled, the query cache should experience a high degree of "hits", meaning that queries in the cache are being reused by other user connections. A low hit rate may mean that not enough memory is allocated to the cache, identical queries are not being issued repeatedly to the server, or that the statements in the query cache are invalidated too frequently by INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE statements.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Query Cache Not Available

    MySQL can cache the results of SELECT statements in memory so that they do not have to constantly be parsed and executed. If your application often runs the same queries over and over, caching the results can increase performance significantly. It's important to use a version or binary of MySQL that supports the query cache.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Query Cache Not Enabled

    Enabling the query cache can increase performance by 200% for queries that are executed often and have large result sets.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Query Cache Potentially Undersized

    When the Query Cache is full, and needs to add more queries to the cache, it will make more room in the cache by freeing the least recently used queries from the cache, and then inserting the new queries. If this is happening often then you should increase the size of the cache to avoid this constant "swapping".

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • RAM Usage Excessive

    A reasonable amount of free memory is required for a system to perform well. Without free memory, new processes and threads cannot start, and the operating system may do excessive paging (swapping blocks of memory to and from disk).

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Root Account Can Login Remotely

    By default, MySQL includes a root account with unlimited privileges that is typically used to administer the MySQL server. If possible, accounts with this much power should not allow remote logins in order to limit access to only those users able to login to the machine on which MySQL is running. This helps prevent unauthorized users from accessing and changing the system.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Root Account Without Password

    The root user account has unlimited privileges and is intended for administrative tasks. Privileged accounts should have strong passwords to prevent unauthorized users from accessing and changing the system.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Row-based Replication Broken For UTF8 CHAR Columns Longer Than 85 Characters

    Due to Bug#37426, row-based replication breaks when CHAR() UTF8 fields with a length greater than 85 characters are used.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Security Alterations Detected: User Privileges Granted

    For development environments, changes to database security privileges may be a normal occurrence, but for production environments it is wise to know when any security changes occur with respect to database privileges, and to ensure that those changes are authorized and required.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Security Alterations Detected: User Privileges Revoked

    For development environments, changes to database security privileges may be a normal occurrence, but for production environments it is wise to know when any security changes occur with respect to database privileges, and to ensure that those changes are authorized and required.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Security Alterations Have Been Detected

    For development environments, changes to database security privileges may be a normal occurrence, but for production environments it is wise to know when any security changes occur with respect to database privileges, and to ensure that those changes are authorized and required.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Security Risk with BINLOG statement

    Due to Bug#31611, any user can execute BINLOG statements, which effectively gives them the ability to execute any SQL statement regardless of the privileges associated with their user account (i.e. as given by the GRANT statement). This allows any connected user to get any privileges they want, edit any data they want, add and drop tables, etc.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Server Contains Default "test" Database

    By default, MySQL comes with a database named test that anyone can access. This database is intended only for testing and should be removed before moving into a production environment. Because the default test database can be accessed by any user and has permissive privileges, it should be dropped immediately as part of the installation process.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Server Has Accounts Without A Password

    Accounts without passwords are particularly dangerous because an attacker needs to guess only a username. Assigning passwords to all accounts helps prevent unauthorized users from accessing the system.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Server Has Anonymous Accounts

    Anonymous MySQL accounts allow clients to connect to the server without specifying a username. Since anonymous accounts are well known in MySQL, removing them helps prevent unauthorized users from accessing the system.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Server Includes A Root User Account

    By default, MySQL includes a root account with unlimited privileges that is typically used to administer the MySQL server. There is no reason this account must be named 'root'. Accounts with this much power should not be easily discovered. Since the root account is well known in MySQL, changing its name helps prevent unauthorized users from accessing and changing the system.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Server-Enforced Data Integrity Checking Disabled

    SQL Modes define what SQL syntax MySQL should support and what kind of data validation checks it should perform. If no SQL modes are enabled this means there is no form of server-enforced data integrity, which means incoming data that is invalid will not be rejected by the server, but instead will be changed to conform to the target column's default datatype. Note, however, that beginning with MySQL 4.1, any client can change its own session SQL mode value at any time.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Server-Enforced Data Integrity Checking Not Strict

    SQL Modes define what SQL syntax MySQL should support and what kind of data validation checks it should perform. There are many possible options that can be used in conjunction with each other to specify varying degrees of syntax and data validation checks the MySQL server will perform. However, to ensure the highest level of confidence for data integrity, at least one of the following should be included in the list: TRADITIONAL, STRICT_TRANS_TABLES, or STRICT_ALL_TABLES.

    Note, however, that beginning with MySQL 4.1, any client can change its own session SQL mode value at any time.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Slave Detection Of Network Outages Too High

    Slaves must deal with network connectivity outages that affect the ability of the slave to get the latest data from the master, and hence cause replication to fall behind. However, the slave notices the network outage only after receiving no data from the master for slave_net_timeout seconds. You may want to decrease slave_net_timeout so the outages -- and associated connection retries -- are detected and resolved faster. The default for this parameter is 3600 seconds (1 hour), which is too high for many environments.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Slave Error: Unknown or Incorrect Time Zone

    In order to use time zone names in conjunction with certain statements, functions, and data types, you must configure the server to understand those names by loading information from the operating system's time zone files into a set of tables in the mysql database. However, while the MySQL installation procedure creates those time zone tables, it does not load them; they must be loaded manually after installation.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Slave Execution Position Too Far Behind Read Position

    When a slave receives updates from its master, the I/O thread stores the data in local files known as relay logs. The slave's SQL thread reads the relay logs and executes the updates they contain. If the position from which the SQL thread is reading is way behind the position to which the I/O thread is currently writing, it is a sign that replication is getting behind and results of queries directed to the slave may not reflect the latest changes made on the master.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Slave Has Been Stopped

    If replication on a slave has been stopped, it means the slave is not retrieving the latest statements from the master and it is not executing those statements on the slave.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Slave Has Experienced A Replication Error

    When a slave receives updates from its master it must apply those updates locally so the data on the slave matches that on the server. If an error occurs while applying an update on a slave, the data on the slave may not match that on the master and it is an indication that replication may be broken.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Slave Has Login Accounts With Inappropriate Privileges

    Altering and dropping tables on a slave can break replication. Unless the slave also hosts non-replicated tables, there is no need for accounts with these privileges. As an alternative, you should set the read_only flag ON so the server allows no updates except from users that have the SUPER privilege or from updates performed by slave threads.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Slave Has Problem Communicating With Master

    Slaves must connect to a master to get the latest data from the master. If they cannot connect, or periodically have trouble connecting, replication may fall behind (i.e. the slave may not have the lastest data that was written to the master).

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Slave Has Stopped Replicating

    If neither the slave I/O thread nor the slave SQL threads are running, it means the slave is not getting the latest statements from the master and it is not executing those statements on the slave, and thus replication has stopped entirely.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Slave I/O Thread Not Running

    The slave I/O thread is the thread that retrieves statements from the master's binary log and records them into the slave's relay log. If this thread isn't running, it means the slave is not able to retrieve the latest data from the master.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Slave Not Configured As Read Only

    Arbitrary or unintended updates to a slave may break replication or cause a slave to be inconsistent with respect to its master. Making a slave read_only can be useful to ensure that a slave accepts updates only from its master server and not from clients; it minimizes the possibility of unintended updates.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Slave Relay Log Space Is Very Large

    When a slave receives updates from its master, the I/O thread stores the data in local files known as relay logs. The slave's SQL thread reads the relay logs and executes the updates they contain. After the SQL thread has executed all the updates in a relay log, the file is no longer needed and can be deleted to conserve disk space.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Slave Relay Logs Not Automatically Purged

    When a slave receives updates from its master, the I/O thread stores the data in local files known as relay logs. The slave's SQL thread reads the relay logs and executes the updates they contain. After the SQL thread has executed all the updates in a relay log, the file is no longer needed and can be deleted to conserve disk space.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Slave SQL Thread Not Running

    The slave SQL thread is the thread that reads statements from the slave's relay log and executes them to bring the slave in sync with the master. If this thread isn't running, it means the slave is not able to apply the latest changes it has read from the master, and results of queries directed to the slave may not reflect the latest changes made on the master.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Slave SQL Thread Reading From Older Relay Log Than I/O Thread

    When a slave receives updates from its master, the I/O thread stores the data in local files known as relay logs. The slave's SQL thread reads the relay logs and executes the updates they contain. If the SQL thread is reading from an older relay log than the one to which the I/O thread is currently writing, it is a sign that replication is getting behind and results of queries directed to the slave may not reflect the latest changes made on the master.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Slave Too Far Behind Master

    If a slave is too far behind the master, results of queries directed to the slave may not reflect the latest changes made on the master.

    Default frequency 00:01:00

  • Slave Waiting To Free Relay Log Space

    For slaves with limited disk space you can place a limit on how large the replication relay log can grow. When the limit is reached, the I/O thread stops reading binary log events from the master server until the SQL thread has caught up and deleted some unprocessed relay logs. While this protects MySQL from filling up the disk, it means replication is delayed and the slave will fall behind the master.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Slave Without REPLICATION SLAVE Accounts

    If the master ever fails, you may want to use one of the slaves as the new master. An account with the REPLICATION SLAVE privilege must exist for a server to act as a replication master (so a slave can connect to it), so it's a good idea to create this account on your slaves to prepare it to take over for a master if needed.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Slow Query Log Not Enabled

    The slow query log can be used to identify queries that take a long time to complete.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Stored Procedures Found With SELECT * Syntax

    Best practices for SQL coding state that no query should be issued with SELECT *. Reasons include:

    • To ensure that only the necessary columns are returned from a SQL statement, the actual column names should be specifically entered. This cuts down on unwanted network traffic as only columns necessary for query satisfaction are present.

    • If the underlying table has columns added or removed, the query itself may malfunction if cursors or other such application objects are used.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Stored Routine Runs In Definer''s Rather Than Caller''s Security Context

    Due to bug 18630, a stored routine created by one user and then made accessible to a different user using GRANT EXECUTE could be executed by that user with the privileges of the routine's definer.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Symlinks Are Enabled

    You can move tables and databases from the database directory to other locations and replace them with symbolic links to the new locations. You might want to do this, for example, to move a database to a file system with more free space or to increase the speed of your system by spreading your tables to different disks.

    However, symlinks can compromise security. This is especially important if you run mysqld as root, because anyone who has write access to the server's data directory could then delete any file in the system!

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Table Cache Not Optimal

    MySQL is multi-threaded, so there may be many clients issuing queries for a given table simultaneously. To minimize the problem with multiple client threads having different states on the same table, the table is opened independently by each concurrent thread.

    The table cache is used to cache file descriptors for open tables and there is a single cache shared by all clients. Increasing the size of the table cache allows mysqld to keep more tables open simultanously by reducing the number of file open and close operations that must be done. If the value of Open_tables is approaching the value of table_cache, this may indicate performance problems.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Table Cache Set Too Low For Startup

    The table cache size controls the number of open tables that can occur at any one time on the server. MySQL will work to open and close tables as needed, however you should avoid having the table cache set too low, causing MySQL to constantly open and close tables to satisfy object access.

    If the table cache limit has been exceeded by the number of tables opened in the first three hours of service, then the table cache size is likely set too low.

    Default frequency 00:30:00

  • Table Lock Contention Excessive

    Performance can be degraded if the percentage of table operations that have to wait for a lock is high compared to the overall number of lock requests. This can happen when using a table-level locking storage engine, such as MyISAM, instead of a row-level locking storage engine.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Table Scans Excessive

    The target server does not appear to be using indexes efficiently. The values of Handler_read_rnd_next and Handler_read_rnd together - which reflect the number of rows read via full table scans - are high compared to the sum of Handler variables which denote all row accesses - such as Handler_read_key, Handler_read_next etc. You should examine your tables and queries for proper use of indexes.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Tables Found with No Primary or Unique Keys

    A primary or unique key of a relational table uniquely identifies each record in the table. Except in very unusual circumstances, every database table should have one or more columns designated as the primary key or as a unique key, and it is common practice to declare one.

    Default frequency 12:00:00

  • Temporary Tables To Disk Ratio Excessive

    If the space required to build a temporary table exceeds either tmp_table_size or max_heap_table_size, MySQL creates a disk-based table in the server's tmpdir directory. Also, tables that have TEXT or BLOB columns are automatically placed on disk.

    For performance reasons it is ideal to have most temporary tables created in memory, leaving exceedingly large temporary tables to be created on disk.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Thread Cache Not Enabled

    Each connection to the MySQL database server runs in its own thread. Thread creation takes time, so rather than killing the thread when a connection is closed, the server can keep the thread in its thread cache and use it for a new connection later.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Thread Cache Size May Not Be Optimal

    Each connection to the MySQL database server runs in its own thread. Thread creation takes time, so rather than killing the thread when a connection is closed, the server can keep the thread in its thread cache and use it for a new connection later.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Too Many Concurrent Queries Running

    Too many active queries indicates there is a severe load on the server, and may be a sign of lock contention or unoptimized SQL queries.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • Use Of View Overrides Column Update Privileges On Underlying Table

    Due to Bug#27878, by using a view, a user who only has privileges to update a given column of a table is able to update any column of that table, even though the view is defined with SQL SECURITY INVOKER. Also, use of a view could allow a user to gain update privileges for tables in other databases.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • User Can Gain Privileges By Running Stored Routine Declared Using SQL SECURITY INVOKER

    Due to Bug#27337, if a stored routine was declared using SQL SECURITY INVOKER, a user who invoked the routine could gain privileges. For example, a user without the CREATE privilege on a certain database could gain that privilege after invoking a stored routine.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • User Has Rights To Database That Does Not Exist

    When a database is dropped, user privileges on the database are not automatically dropped. This has security implications as that user will regain privileges if a database with the same name is created in the future, which may not be the intended result.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • User With Only ALTER Privilege On Partitioned Table Can Obtain SELECT Privilege Information

    Due to Bug#23675, a user with only the ALTER privilege on a partitioned table could obtain information about the table that should require the SELECT privilege.

    This bug has been fixed in later versions of the MySQL server.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

  • Users Can View All Databases On MySQL Server

    The SHOW DATABASES privilege should be granted only to users who need to see all the databases on a MySQL Server. It is recommended that the MySQL Server be started with the --skip-show-database option enabled to prevent anyone from using the SHOW DATABASES statement unless they have been specifically granted the SHOW DATABASES privilege.

    Note: If a user is granted any global privilege, such as CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES or LOCK TABLES, they are automatically given the ability to show databases unless the server is started with the --skip-show-database option enabled. DBAs should be aware of this fact, in the event that any applications make use of temporary tables.

    Default frequency 00:05:00

  • XA Distributed Transaction Support Enabled For InnoDB

    XA Distributed Transaction support is turned on by default. If you are not using this feature, note that it adds an extra fsync for each transaction and may adversely affect performance.

    Default frequency 06:00:00

15.12.11.2. Graph Definition Reference

Individual graphs are defined below.

Connections

Displays the number of client connections by displaying the number of connected threads, active threads, and cached threads.

NameConnections
Range Label# connections
SeriesExpression
Cachedcached
Runningrunning
Totalconnected
VariablesData Item
connectedmysql:status:Threads_connected
runningmysql:status:Threads_running
cachedmysql:status:Threads_cached

Connections - Aborted

Shows the number of client connections that have been aborted, either during connection, or aborted active connections. This information is useful to determine if your server is overloaded (and therefore aborting connections), or if there is a network fault. Aborted connections also indicate those which did not disconnect properly, for example during a timeout.

NameConnections - Aborted
Range Labeltotal/min
SeriesExpression
Clientsclients
Connectionsconnections
VariablesData Item
clientsmysql:status:Aborted_clients
connectionsmysql:status:Aborted_connects

Connections - Cache

Displays the thread cache information, comparing new thread creations against all database connections.

NameConnections - Cache
Range Labeltotal/min
SeriesExpression
Connectionsconnections
Threads Createdtcreated
VariablesData Item
tcreatedmysql:status:Threads_created
connectionsmysql:status:Connections

Connections - Maximum

Shows the maximum number of connections, and the maximum number of used connections.

NameConnections - Maximum
Range Labeltotal
SeriesExpression
Allowedmax_connections_allowed
Usedmax_connections_used
VariablesData Item
max_connections_allowedmysql:variables:max_connections
max_connections_usedmysql:status:Max_used_connections

CPU Utilization

Displays the CPU usage statistics over time for the machine hosting the MySQL server. The graph shows the aggregate system, user, wait and idle times for your CPU(s). You can use this information to help determine your CPU utilization and whether you are getting the most efficient use of your CPU power.

NameCPU Utilization
Range Label%
SeriesExpression
Kernelsys/(sys+user+wait+idle)*100
Total(sys+user+wait)/(sys+user+wait+idle)*100
Useruser/(sys+user+wait+idle)*100
Wait I/Owait/(sys+user+wait+idle)*100
VariablesData Item
sysos:cpu:cpu_sys
useros:cpu:cpu_user
waitos:cpu:cpu_wait
idleos:cpu:cpu_idle

Database Activity

Displays the database activity, by showing the individual counts over time of different DML statements per minute. For example, you can monitor the number of SELECT statements executed per minute over time and gain an understanding of your server throughput. This information can be used to monitor the activity level, and provide a useful quick reference for your server operation.

NameDatabase Activity
Range Labelavg statements/sec
SeriesExpression
Call((call_proc)/60)
Delete((deletes+delete_multi)/60)
Insert((inserts+insert_selects)/60)
Replace((replaces+replace_selects)/60)
Select(selects/60)
Update((updates+update_multi)/60)
VariablesData Item
selectsmysql:status:Com_select
insertsmysql:status:Com_insert
insert_selectsmysql:status:Com_insert_select
updatesmysql:status:Com_update
update_multimysql:status:Com_update_multi
replacesmysql:status:Com_replace
replace_selectsmysql:status:Com_replace_select
deletesmysql:status:Com_delete
delete_multimysql:status:Com_delete_multi
call_procmysql:status:Com_call_procedure

Hit Ratios

Shows the cache hit ratios (as a percentage) for the query cache, MyISAM and InnoDB tables, and the connection and thread cache information. The information provided by the hit ratios can provide indicators of whether your cache is working effectively, or is of a size suitable for the data that you are storing and retrieving. Low hit ratios indicate that your cache are inefficient and may need to be investigated.

NameHit Ratios
Range Label%
SeriesExpression
InnoDB Buffer100-((iReads / (iReadRequests+1))*100)
Key Cache(100-((keyReads / (keyReadRequests+1))*100)) * (keyReadRequests >= keyReads)
Query Cache(qHits/(qHits+qInserts+1))*100
Thread Cache100-((tcreated / (connections+1))*100)
VariablesData Item
keyReadsmysql:status:Key_reads
keyReadRequestsmysql:status:Key_read_requests
iReadsmysql:status:Innodb_buffer_pool_reads
iReadRequestsmysql:status:Innodb_buffer_pool_read_requests
tcreatedmysql:status:Threads_created
connectionsmysql:status:Connections
qHitsmysql:status:Qcache_hits
qInsertsmysql:status:Qcache_inserts

InnoDB Adaptive Hash Index Memory

Shows the size of the InnoDB adaptive hash index. These are used to hold the data from tables in memory providing the size of the indexes is small enough to fit in memory. The graph shows the memory usage of the adaptive hash index.

NameInnoDB Adaptive Hash Index Memory
Range LabelMB
SeriesExpression
Hash Node Size( hash_size * 16384 ) / 1024 / 1024
VariablesData Item
hash_sizemysql:innodbstatus:innodb_hash_node_heap

InnoDB Adaptive Hash Index Searches

Displays the number of InnoDB adaptive hash index searches and those searches not using the adaptive hash index. You can use this to determine if your adaptive hash index is being used correctly, and is of a suitable size of the information and tables that are being accessed.

NameInnoDB Adaptive Hash Index Searches
Range Labelsearches/sec
SeriesExpression
hash searcheshash
non-hash searchesnonhash
VariablesData Item
hashmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_hash_searches_per_sec
nonhashmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_non_hash_searches_per_sec

InnoDB Adaptive Hash Index Usage

NameInnoDB Adaptive Hash Index Usage
Range Labelcells
SeriesExpression
total cellssize
used cellsused
VariablesData Item
sizemysql:innodbstatus:innodb_hash_table_size
usedmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_hash_used_cells

InnoDB Buffer Pool

Displays the size and page usage of the InnoDB buffer pool, providing information on the cache usage and performance. The graph shows the buffer pool size, active pages, and the number of modified pages.

NameInnoDB Buffer Pool
Range LabelMB
SeriesExpression
Modified(modified*16384)/(1024*1024)
Total Size(size*16384)/(1024*1024)
Used(used*16384)/(1024*1024)
VariablesData Item
sizemysql:innodbstatus:innodb_bp_size
usedmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_bp_db_pages
modifiedmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_bp_modified_pages

InnoDB OS File Access

Displays the InnoDB I/O counts showing the number of fsync, read, and write operations used to support InnoDB tables.

NameInnoDB OS File Access
Range Labelavg operations/sec
SeriesExpression
File fsync()(fsync/60)
File Reads(read/60)
File Writes(write/60)
VariablesData Item
readmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_io_os_file_reads
writemysql:innodbstatus:innodb_io_os_file_writes
fsyncmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_io_os_file_fsyncs

InnoDB Row Details

Shows the row counts per minute for individual SQL operations (READ, INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE).

NameInnoDB Row Details
Range Labelavg rows/sec
SeriesExpression
Rows Deleted (deleted/60)
Rows Inserted(inserted/60)
Rows Read(read/60)
Rows Updated(udpated/60)
VariablesData Item
readmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_rows_read
insertedmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_rows_inserted
updatedmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_rows_updated
deletedmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_rows_deleted

InnoDB Semaphores

Displays the InnoDB semaphore status. The graph indicates the amount of time that different InnoDB threads have spent waiting due to the locks used to prevent the same structures being updated at the same time. A large number of threads waiting for the semaphores may be a result of disk I/O or connection problems inside InnoDB. You may want to modify your InnoDB thread concurrency.

NameInnoDB Semaphores
Range Labelavg waits/sec
SeriesExpression
OS Waits(oswaits/60)
Spin Rounds(srounds/60)
Spin Waits(swaits/60)
VariablesData Item
swaitsmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_sem_mutex_spin_waits
sroundsmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_sem_mutex_rounds
oswaitsmysql:innodbstatus:innodb_sem_mutex_os_waits

KBytes In/Out

Displays the total Kilobytes per minute of bytes transferred to/from the server by client applications. Spikes in this output may indicate an unusual application operation or connection.

NameKBytes In/Out
Range Labelavg kbytes/sec
SeriesExpression
Received((bytesIn/1024)/60)
Sent((bytesOut/1024)/60)
Total(((bytesIn+bytesOut)/1024)/60)
VariablesData Item
bytesInmysql:status:Bytes_received
bytesOutmysql:status:Bytes_sent

Load Average

The load average of the server hosting the MySQL server. The load average shows the number of processes using or waiting for CPU time in the last 1, 5 and 15 minutes. Load averages showing a load highe than the number of CPU cores may indicate an overloaded server.

NameLoad Average
Range LabelLoad Average
SeriesExpression
1zero
15two
5one
VariablesData Item
zeroos:loadavg:0
oneos:loadavg:1
twoos:loadavg:2

Memory Usage - Agent

Displays the current amount of memory used by the agent, and by the Lua component of the agent.

NameMemory Usage - Agent
Range LabelMB
SeriesExpression
Agentagent_mem_size / 1024 / 1024
Lualua_mem_size / 1024 / 1024
VariablesData Item
lua_mem_sizeagent:lua:mem_size
agent_mem_sizeagent:proc:mem_resident

Memory Usage - OS Resident

Displays the RAM usage on the server for the monitored MySQL instance. You should compare the total and used RAM values to ensure that you are not exceeding your available RAM, which will lead to swapping and performance issues.

NameMemory Usage - OS Resident
Range LabelMB
SeriesExpression
Totalram_total/(1024*1024)
Used(ram_total-ram_unused)/(1024*1024)
VariablesData Item
ram_totalos:mem:ram_total
ram_unusedos:mem:ram_unused

Memory Usage - OS Virtual

Displays the use of swap space on the server for the monitored MySQL instance. High swap usage may indicate that your server needs more RAM or that your MySQL configuration needs to be modified, as high levels of swap will have a negative impact on performance.

NameMemory Usage - OS Virtual
Range LabelMB
SeriesExpression
Totalswap_total/(1024*1024)
Used(swap_total-swap_unused)/(1024*1024)
VariablesData Item
swap_totalos:mem:swap_total
swap_unusedos:mem:swap_unused

MyISAM Key Buffer Usage

Displays the efficiency of the MyISAM key index buffer usage. On a system using a lot of MyISAM tables, low usage indicates that your MyISAM key buffer size is too high (reducing the RAM available for other buffering). High usage may indicate that you need to increase your MyISAM key buffer size to help improve performance.

NameMyISAM Key Buffer Usage
Range LabelMB
SeriesExpression
Allocated((blk_size)*(used+unused))/1024/1024
Total Sizekey_buffer/1024/1024
Unused(blk_size*unused)/1024/1024
Used(blk_size*used)/1024/1024
VariablesData Item
key_buffermysql:variables:key_buffer_size
blk_sizemysql:variables:key_cache_block_size
unusedmysql:status:Key_blocks_unused
usedmysql:status:Key_blocks_used

Opened Tables

The number of tables in the open state per minute.

NameOpened Tables
Range Labeltotal/min
SeriesExpression
Opened TablesopenedTables
VariablesData Item
openedTablesmysql:status:Opened_tables

Query Cache Blocks

The block usage of the query cache. Low usage may indicate that you are not getting the best performance out of your query cache. High numbers may indicate that you need to increase your query cache size to allow more queries to be cached.

NameQuery Cache Blocks
Range Labelnum blocks
SeriesExpression
Freefree_blocks
Sizesize_blocks
VariablesData Item
size_blocksmysql:status:Qcache_total_blocks
free_blocksmysql:status:Qcache_free_blocks

Query Cache Efficiency

Displays the hits, inserts and queries not cacheable in the query cache. Low cache hits may indicate that your queries are being expired from the cache before they can be used, which may mean they are unsuitable for storing in the query cache.

NameQuery Cache Efficiency
Range Labelavg cache ops/sec
SeriesExpression
Hits(hits/60)
Inserts(inserts/60)
Not Cached(not_cached/60)
VariablesData Item
hitsmysql:status:Qcache_hits
insertsmysql:status:Qcache_inserts
not_cachedmysql:status:Qcache_not_cached

Query Cache Lowmem Prunes

Displays the number of queries removed from the cache because the size of the query cache was not large enough to store the queries that can be cached. Try increasing your query cache size.

NameQuery Cache Lowmem Prunes
Range Labelavg cache ops/sec
SeriesExpression
Lowmem Prunes(deletes/60)
VariablesData Item
deletesmysql:status:Qcache_lowmem_prunes

Query Cache Memory

Displays the free space and total size of the query cache.

NameQuery Cache Memory
Range LabelMB
SeriesExpression
Free MBfree/(1024*1024)
Size MBsize/(1024*1024)
VariablesData Item
sizemysql:variables:query_cache_size
freemysql:status:Qcache_free_memory

Query Cache Queries

Shows the number of queries stored in the query cache. In normal operation this should be a relatively constant figure. A large number of switches between high and low numbers may indicate that differently sized queries are being inserted into the query cache, and then later removed as a high number of smaller queries are added to the cache. Try increasing the size of your query cache.

NameQuery Cache Queries
Range Labelnum queries
SeriesExpression
Queries in Cachequeries
VariablesData Item
queriesmysql:status:Qcache_queries_in_cache

Replication Delay

Displays the number of seconds behind the master for a given slave in a replication scenario. An increasing value means that your slave is unable to keep up with your master.

NameReplication Delay
Range Labeltotal seconds
SeriesExpression
Seconds Behind Mastersbehind
VariablesData Item
sbehindmysql:slavestatus:Seconds_Behind_Master

Row Accesses

Displays the aggregated row access statistics per minute. Information is shown both in terms of the full table scans (which are expensive to perform), and index based accesses.

NameRow Accesses
Range Labelavg rows/sec
SeriesExpression
Average Rows Per Query ((first+key+next+prev+hread_rnd+hread_rnd_next+sort_rows) / questions)
Rows Read via Full Scan ((hread_rnd+hread_rnd_next)/60)
Rows Read via Indexes ((first+key+next+prev)/60)
VariablesData Item
firstmysql:status:Handler_read_first
keymysql:status:Handler_read_key
nextmysql:status:Handler_read_next
prevmysql:status:Handler_read_prev
hread_rndmysql:status:Handler_read_rnd
hread_rnd_nextmysql:status:Handler_read_rnd_next
sort_rowsmysql:status:Sort_rows
questionsmysql:status:Questions

Row Writes

Shows the number of delete, write (INSERT), and update operations on rows per minute on all tables regardless of storage engine.

NameRow Writes
Range Labelavg rows/sec
SeriesExpression
Rows Deleted(delete/60)
Rows Inserted(write/60)
Rows Updated(update/60)
VariablesData Item
deletemysql:status:Handler_delete
updatemysql:status:Handler_update
writemysql:status:Handler_write

Sort Activity

Shows the number of different sort operations performed on queries.

NameSort Activity
Range Labeltotal/min
SeriesExpression
Merge PassesSort_merge_passes
RangeSort_range
ScanSort_scan
VariablesData Item
Sort_merge_passesmysql:status:Sort_merge_passes
Sort_rangemysql:status:Sort_range
Sort_scanmysql:status:Sort_scan

Table Lock Wait Ratio

Shows the percentage of table locks that have had to wait before an operation can continue. High lock ratios can indicate high contention in your tables, with too many operations having to wait, affecting the performance.

NameTable Lock Wait Ratio
Range Labellock wait %
SeriesExpression
Wait Ratio((lock_waits/lock_immediate)*100)
VariablesData Item
lock_waitsmysql:status:Table_locks_waited
lock_immediatemysql:status:Table_locks_immediate

Table Locks

Shows the average number of table locks per second.

NameTable Locks
Range Labelavg locks/sec
SeriesExpression
Immediate(locks_immediate/60)
Waited(locks_waited/60)
VariablesData Item
locks_waitedmysql:status:Table_locks_waited
locks_immediatemysql:status:Table_locks_immediate

Temporary Tables

Displays the number of memory temporary tables and disk temporary tables. Disk temporary tables are slower to create, populate, and read back. You may want to increase your memory temporary table size or check your queries to determine whether the use of temporary tables can be minimized.

NameTemporary Tables
Range Labeltotal/min
SeriesExpression
Disk Temp TablesdiskTempTables
Memory Temp TablesmemoryTempTables
VariablesData Item
memoryTempTablesmysql:status:Created_tmp_tables
diskTempTablesmysql:status:Created_tmp_disk_tables

15.13. MySQL Enterprise Monitor Frequently Asked Questions

Note

MySQL Enterprise subscription, MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Replication Monitor, and MySQL Query Analyzer are only available to commercial customers. To learn more, see: http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

FAQ Categories

General Usage

Questions

  • 16.13.1: My MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is behind a firewall but it cannot communicate with the MySQL Enterprise website. I normally use a proxy service to access external websites. How do I configure the proxy settings for MySQL Enterprise Dashboard?

  • 16.13.2: How do I change the name of a server?

  • 16.13.3: I have started a Data Migration of my old data for a server to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager 2.0, but I have noticed that the performance of the monitor server has degraded significantly. Can I stop the migration?

  • 16.13.4: I have set the graphs to update every 5 minutes, and the page refresh to occur every minute. The page is refreshing correctly, but the graphs do not seem to update.

  • 16.13.5: During query analysis, I am unable to obtain an EXAMPLE or EXPLAIN information when examining the detail of the analyzed query within the Query Analyzer panel.

  • 16.13.6: I have enabled EXPLAIN queries for Query Analyzer, but no queries with the EXPLAIN data are showing up in the display.

  • 16.13.7: Does Query Analyzer work with all versions of MySQL and the MySQL Client Libraries?

  • 16.13.8: Why do some rules appear to have a Severity of Unknown?

  • 16.13.9: What is the relationship between the advisor JAR file and the key?

  • 16.13.10: Does the Gold-level key support Silver-level advisors?

  • 16.13.11: Can the Trial-level key work with the Gold-level advisors JAR file?

  • 16.13.12: Can I run MySQL Enterprise Service Manager on machine with other applications running?

  • 16.13.13: How frequently is the data purge process executed?

Questions and Answers

16.13.1: My MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is behind a firewall but it cannot communicate with the MySQL Enterprise website. I normally use a proxy service to access external websites. How do I configure the proxy settings for MySQL Enterprise Dashboard?

To configure a proxy service, edit the apache-tomcat/conf/catalina.properties file within the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager installation directory. Change the http.proxyHost and http.proxyPort properties:

http.proxyHost=proxy.example.com
http.proxyPort=8080

Restart the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager for the change to take effect:

shell> mysqlmonitorctl.sh restart

16.13.2: How do I change the name of a server?

Go to the Manage Servers panel within Settings and click Rename server.

Renaming the server in this way will override all other server naming, including changes to the agent configuration.

16.13.3: I have started a Data Migration of my old data for a server to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager 2.0, but I have noticed that the performance of the monitor server has degraded significantly. Can I stop the migration?

You can stop the migration of your historical data at any time. Go to the Manage Servers display of the Settings panel and click Stop next to each server that is being migrated. You can restart the migration at any point.

16.13.4: I have set the graphs to update every 5 minutes, and the page refresh to occur every minute. The page is refreshing correctly, but the graphs do not seem to update.

The graph refresh and page refresh are two different parameters. The graphs are updated according to their refresh period, regardless of the refresh period set for the main display page.

16.13.5: During query analysis, I am unable to obtain an EXAMPLE or EXPLAIN information when examining the detail of the analyzed query within the Query Analyzer panel.

You must explicitly enable the EXAMPLE and EXPLAIN query functionality. Make sure that you have enabled both panels. See Section 15.10.7, “Query Analyzer Settings”.

16.13.6: I have enabled EXPLAIN queries for Query Analyzer, but no queries with the EXPLAIN data are showing up in the display.

Query Analyzer only obtains EXPLAIN information when the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent identifies a long running query. If none of your queries exceed the defined threshold, then the EXPLAIN information is not obtain and provided to the Query Analyze for display.

To change the query duration at which an EXPLAIN is triggered, you must edit the share/mysql-proxy/quan.lua file within the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent directory on each server. You need to change the value configured in the auto_explain_min_exec_time_us. The default is 500ms:

---
-- configuration
--
-- SET GLOBAL analyze_query.auto_filter = 0
if not proxy.global.config.quan then
        proxy.global.config.quan = {
                analyze_queries  = true,   -- track all queries
                query_cutoff     = 160,    -- only show the first 160 chars of the query
                num_worst_queries = 5,
                auto_explain     = true,
                auto_explain_min_exec_time_us = 500 * 1000
        }
end

The value is expressed in microseconds, which is why the value must be multiplied by 1000. To reduce this value to 100ms, modify this line:

auto_explain_min_exec_time_us = 100 * 1000

These changes take effect without restarting MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent.

16.13.7: Does Query Analyzer work with all versions of MySQL and the MySQL Client Libraries?

The MySQL Proxy component, and Query Analyzer, require that clients connecting through MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent are using MySQL 5.0 or later. Clients that use the library provided with MySQL 4.1 or earlier do not work with MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent.

16.13.8: Why do some rules appear to have a Severity of Unknown?

Due to timing issues, certain rules such as “32-Bit Binary Running on 64-Bit AMD Or Intel System” and “Key Buffer Size Greater Than 4 GB” do not evaluate correctly due to timing issues. This is a known issue that is expected to be resolved in future versions of MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

16.13.9: What is the relationship between the advisor JAR file and the key?

The JAR file contains graph and advisor definitions. The key file contains typical customer validation data such as contract information, number of servers covered, subscription level and dates.

16.13.10: Does the Gold-level key support Silver-level advisors?

The Gold-level advisor JAR file will contain Silver-level advisors plus Gold-level advisors. However, you cannot use the Gold-level key with the Silver-level advisors JAR file. The Gold-level key can only be used with the Gold-level advisors JAR file.

16.13.11: Can the Trial-level key work with the Gold-level advisors JAR file?

The Trial-level key can only be used with the Trial-level advisors JAR file.

16.13.12: Can I run MySQL Enterprise Service Manager on machine with other applications running?

You can, but Oracle recommends running your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager on a dedicated machine, especially when monitoring many agents.

16.13.13: How frequently is the data purge process executed?

A data purge process is started approximately once a minute. If you have changed the purge period then the data will start to be purged within the next minute.

MySQL Enterprise

Questions

  • 16.13.1: What is MySQL Enterprise?

  • 16.13.2: Can I buy MySQL Enterprise subscriptions for multiple years?

  • 16.13.3: Can I buy MySQL Enterprise subscriptions for only some of my production MySQL database servers?

  • 16.13.4: Do all my MySQL Enterprise subscriptions need to be at the same tier?

  • 16.13.5: What if I plan to add more MySQL servers to my MySQL Enterprise subscription?

  • 16.13.6: How should I decide between MySQL Enterprise Basic, Silver, Gold and Platinum?

  • 16.13.7: What is MySQL Enterprise Server?

  • 16.13.8: What is MySQL Production Support?

  • 16.13.9: Does MySQL Enterprise include 24x7 Technical Support?

  • 16.13.10: Does MySQL Enterprise include Maintenance, Updates, and Upgrades?

  • 16.13.11: Does MySQL Enterprise include Emergency Hot Fix Builds?

  • 16.13.12: What is MySQL Consultative Support?

  • 16.13.13: What is a Technical Account Manager?

  • 16.13.14: Does MySQL provide IP (Intellectual Property) Indemnification?

  • 16.13.15: What is the list of Supported Platforms?

  • 16.13.16: Are there any Demo/Tutorials available for MySQL Enterprise?

  • 16.13.17: Are there any MySQL Enterprise White Papers available?

  • 16.13.18: Are there any Webinars available?

  • 16.13.19: What is the pricing of MySQL Enterprise?

  • 16.13.20: What is MySQL Enterprise Unlimited?

  • 16.13.21: How do I get a 30-day trial on MySQL Enterprise?

  • 16.13.22: How do I buy MySQL Enterprise?

Questions and Answers

16.13.1: What is MySQL Enterprise?

The MySQL Enterprise subscription is the most comprehensive offering of MySQL database software, services and production support to ensure your business achieves the highest levels of reliability, security and uptime.

MySQL Enterprise includes:

  • MySQL Enterprise Server software, the most reliable, secure and up-to date version of the world's most popular open source database

  • MySQL Enterprise Monitor that continuously monitors your database and proactively advises you on how to implement MySQL best practices

  • MySQL 24x7 Production Support with fast response times to assist you in the development, deployment and management of MySQL applications

16.13.2: Can I buy MySQL Enterprise subscriptions for multiple years?

MySQL Enterprise subscriptions have duration of at least 1 year. Customers have the flexibility of choosing terms with multi-year durations. To purchase multi-year contracts, please http://www.mysql.com/about/contact/sales.html?s=corporate

16.13.3: Can I buy MySQL Enterprise subscriptions for only some of my production MySQL database servers?

When you choose MySQL Enterprise subscriptions, they must cover all database servers that power that specific application. To negotiate volume discounts, please http://www.mysql.com/about/contact/sales.html?s=corporate

16.13.4: Do all my MySQL Enterprise subscriptions need to be at the same tier?

MySQL Enterprise subscriptions must be at the same tier (Basic, Silver, Gold, Platinum) for all database servers that power that specific application.

16.13.5: What if I plan to add more MySQL servers to my MySQL Enterprise subscription?

A great option is the MySQL Enterprise Unlimited offering that allows you cover an unlimited number of MySQL servers for a fixed, low price. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html

16.13.6: How should I decide between MySQL Enterprise Basic, Silver, Gold and Platinum?

MySQL Enterprise subscriptions are available in 4 tiers, providing you the flexibility of choosing the capabilities and SLA that best meet your requirements. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html If you have questions and what to discuss your specific requirements, please http://www.mysql.com/about/contact/sales.html?s=corporate

16.13.7: What is MySQL Enterprise Server?

MySQL Enterprise Server software is the most reliable, secure and up-to-date version of MySQL for cost-effectively delivering E-commerce, Online Transaction Processing (OLTP), and multi-terabyte Data Warehousing applications. It is a fully integrated transaction-safe, ACID compliant database with full commit, rollback, crash recovery and row level locking capabilities. MySQL delivers the ease of use, scalability, and performance that has made it MySQL the world's most popular open source database. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/server.html

16.13.8: What is MySQL Production Support?

Production Support consists of 4 components:

  • Problem Resolution Support

  • Consultative Support

  • Knowledge Base

  • Technical Account Manager (option)

MySQL Production Support gives you priority access with guaranteed response times to assist you with the development, deployment and management of your MySQL applications. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/support.html

16.13.9: Does MySQL Enterprise include 24x7 Technical Support?

MySQL Enterprise, at the Gold and Platinum tiers, includes 24x7 phone and email access to the MySQL Support Team. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/problemresolution.html

16.13.10: Does MySQL Enterprise include Maintenance, Updates, and Upgrades?

Yes. As long as you have a valid contract for MySQL Enterprise, you will receive all new MySQL Enterprise Server software releases including Software Maintenance, Updates, and Upgrades. The Software Update Service will automatically notify you of the new releases.

16.13.11: Does MySQL Enterprise include Emergency Hot Fix Builds?

MySQL Enterprise, at the Gold and Platinum tiers, gives you the ability to request an Emergency Hot Fix Build to fix issues not already fixed in a MySQL Rapid Update or MySQL Quarterly Service Pack.

16.13.12: What is MySQL Consultative Support?

MySQL Enterprise, at the Gold and Platinum tiers, includes Consultative Support. This is a proactive approach to support that is designed to help you avoid critical outages. MySQL Support Engineers advise you on how to properly design and tune your MySQL servers, schema, queries, and replication set-up to maximize performance and availability. Also, by taking the initiative to properly design and tune your MySQL database applications you can avoid having to purchase expensive hardware for your IT infrastructure. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/consultativesupport.html

16.13.13: What is a Technical Account Manager?

MySQL Enterprise, at the Platinum tier, provides the option for a Technical Account Manager (TAM). The TAM is your advocate within MySQL, who proactively works to maximize your benefits from MySQL Support Services. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/tam.html

16.13.14: Does MySQL provide IP (Intellectual Property) Indemnification?

MySQL Enterprise, at the Gold and Platinum tiers, has the option of IP Indemnification, for qualifying customers at no extra cost. This provides you with legal protection that you expect from enterprise software providers. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/indemnification.html

16.13.15: What is the list of Supported Platforms?

MySQL Enterprise provides broad coverage in its list of Supported Platforms. http://www.mysql.com/support/supportedplatforms/

16.13.16: Are there any Demo/Tutorials available for MySQL Enterprise?

Yes. Multiple self-running demos are available. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/demo.html

16.13.17: Are there any MySQL Enterprise White Papers available?

Yes. Detailed architecture, technology, and business white papers are available. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/whitepapers.html

16.13.18: Are there any Webinars available?

Yes. MySQL provides regularly scheduled Live Webinars. http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/web-seminars/index.html MySQL also provides On-Demand Webinars to fit your schedule. These are recordings of previously held Live Webinars that you can replay at any time. http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/web-seminars/index.html

16.13.19: What is the pricing of MySQL Enterprise?

The pricing model for MySQL Enterprise is based on two key components: per server and per year. MySQL Enterprise does not have artificial restrictions based on CPUs, Memory, Machine Size, or Named Users. MySQL Enterprise is available in 4 tiers (Basic, Silver, Gold and Platinum). Choose the tier that best meets your requirements and budget. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

16.13.20: What is MySQL Enterprise Unlimited?

MySQL Enterprise Unlimited is a unique offering that allows you to deploy an unlimited number of MySQL Enterprise Servers for the price of a single CPU of Oracle Enterprise Edition. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html

16.13.21: How do I get a 30-day trial on MySQL Enterprise?

You can experience the MySQL Enterprise Monitor for 30 days by registering to receive an email with login instructions. http://www.mysql.com/trials/enterprise

16.13.22: How do I buy MySQL Enterprise?

For pricing and to buy MySQL Enterprise, visit the Online Shop For volume discounts or for more information, please http://www.mysql.com/about/contact/sales.html?s=corporate

MySQL Monitor

Questions

  • 16.13.1: What is MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.2: What MySQL Enterprise subscription levels include the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.3: What are the features and related benefits of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.4: What are the immediate benefits of implementing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.5: What are the long-term benefits of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.6: How is the MySQL Enterprise Monitor installed and deployed?

  • 16.13.7: How is the Enterprise Monitor web application architected?

  • 16.13.8: What makes MySQL Enterprise unique?

  • 16.13.9: What versions of MySQL are supported by the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.10: What operating system platforms are supported by the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.11: How do I get the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

  • 16.13.12: What are the MySQL Enterprise Advisors and Advisor Rules?

  • 16.13.13: Which Advisors and features are included under different MySQL Enterprise subscription levels?

  • 16.13.14: Which set of Enterprise Advisors, Advisor Rules and features are best for my use of MySQL?

  • 16.13.15: How are subscribers notified about the availability of new or updated MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Enterprise Advisors and Advisor Rules?

Questions and Answers

16.13.1: What is MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

Included as part of a MySQL Enterprise subscription, the MySQL Enterprise Monitor is a distributed, web-based application that helps customers reduce downtime, tighten security and increase throughput of their MySQL servers by telling them about problems in their database applications before they occur. It is downloadable from the Enterprise Customer web site and is deployed within the safety of the customer datacenter.http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/monitor.html

16.13.2: What MySQL Enterprise subscription levels include the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

The Enterprise Monitor is available under MySQL Enterprise subscription levels Silver, Gold and Platinum. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

16.13.3: What are the features and related benefits of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor is like having a "Virtual DBA Assistant" at your side to recommend best practices to eliminate security vulnerabilities, improve replication, and optimize performance. For the complete features and benefits, visit the http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/monitor-features.html.

16.13.4: What are the immediate benefits of implementing the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

Often MySQL installations are implemented with default settings that may not be best suited for specific applications or usage patterns. The MySQL Advisors go to work immediately in these environments to identify potential problems and proactively notify and advise DBAs on key MySQL settings that can be tuned to improve availability, tighten security, and increase the throughput of their existing MySQL servers

16.13.5: What are the long-term benefits of the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

Over time, the task of managing even medium-scale MySQL server farms becomes exponentially more complicated, especially as the load of users, connections, application queries, and objects on each MySQL server increases. The Enterprise Monitor continually monitors the dynamic security, performance, replication and schema relevant metrics of all MySQL servers, so as the number of MySQL continues to grow, DBAs are kept up to date on potential problems and proactive measures that can be implemented to ensure each server continues to operate at the highest levels of security, performance and reliability.

16.13.6: How is the MySQL Enterprise Monitor installed and deployed?

The Enterprise Monitor is powered by a distributed web application that is installed and deployed within the confines of the corporate firewall.

16.13.7: How is the Enterprise Monitor web application architected?

The Enterprise Monitor web application comprises three components:

  • Monitor Agent: A lightweight C program that is installed on each of the monitored MySQL servers. Its purpose is to collect MySQL SQL and operating system metrics that allow the DBA to monitor the overall health, availability and performance of the MySQL server. The Monitor Agent is the only component within the application that touches or connects to the MySQL Server. It reports the data it collects via XML over HTTP to the centralized Service Manager.

  • Service Manager: The main server of the application. The Service Manager manages and stores the data collections that come in from each monitor agent. It analyzes these collections using MySQL provided best practice Advisor rules to determine the health, security, availability and performance of each of the monitored MySQL Servers. The Service Manager also provides the content for the Enterprise Dashboard which serves as the client user interface for the distributed web application.

  • Repository: A MySQL database that is used to stored data collections and application-level configuration data.

16.13.8: What makes MySQL Enterprise unique?

Of the products on the market that monitor MySQL, SQL code and OS specific metrics, the MySQL Enterprise Monitor is the only solution that is built and supported by the engineers at MySQL. Unlike other solutions that report on raw MySQL and OS level metrics, the MySQL Enterprise Monitor is designed to optimize the use of MySQL by proactively monitoring MySQL instances and providing notifications and 'MySQL DBA expertise in a box' advice on corrective measures DBAs can take before problems occur.

16.13.9: What versions of MySQL are supported by the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor can be used to monitor MySQL versions 4.0 – 5.x.

16.13.10: What operating system platforms are supported by the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

The Enterprise Monitor Service Manager is fully supported on most current versions of Linux, Windows XP and Server Editions, Solaris and Mac OSX. The Monitor Agent supports any platform supported by the MySQL Enterprise server. For the complete list of MySQL Enterprise supported operating systems and CPUs, visit the http://www.mysql.com/support/supportedplatforms/enterprise.html.

16.13.11: How do I get the MySQL Enterprise Monitor?

The MySQL Enterprise Monitor is available for download to MySQL Enterprise customers at the Silver, Gold and Platinum subscription levels.

  • To experience the MySQL Enterprise Monitor for 30 days, visit the http://www.mysql.com/trials/enterprise

  • To buy MySQL Enterprise, visit the Online Shop

16.13.12: What are the MySQL Enterprise Advisors and Advisor Rules?

The MySQL Enterprise Advisors are a set of best practice guidelines for the optimal use of MySQL. Advisors are spread across database specific disciplines and comprise a set of MySQL Advisor Rules that proactively monitor all MySQL servers and report on database application problems before they occur. Each Advisor Rule provides a detailed overview of the problem it is designed to identify, advices on how to correct the problem, specifies commands to implement the recommended fix and links to additional resources for additional research into the issue at hand. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/advisors.html

16.13.13: Which Advisors and features are included under different MySQL Enterprise subscription levels?

For the complete list of the MySQL Enterprise Advisors that are available under each MySQL Enterprise subscription level, visit the http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html.

16.13.14: Which set of Enterprise Advisors, Advisor Rules and features are best for my use of MySQL?

The Enterprise Monitor Advisors and Advisor Rules are available at 3 MySQL Enterprise subscription tiers: Choose MySQL Enterprise Silver if you need:

  • Assurance you are running the most current, bug-free version of MySQL across all of your servers.

  • Recoverability of your MySQL servers.

  • The highest level of security for your MySQL servers.

  • Monitoring of maximum or disallowed MySQL connections.

  • Optimized startup configuration settings.

Choose MySQL Enterprise Gold, when you need everything in Silver, PLUS:

  • Easy collection and detection of problematic SQL code running on your production or development systems.

  • Insight and corrective advice on MySQL replication status, sync, and performance related issues.

  • Auto detection and documenting of your Replication topologies.

  • Advanced monitoring of your Replication and Scale-out environment.

Choose MySQL Enterprise Platinum, when you need everything in Gold, PLUS:

  • Identification and advice on unplanned database and object level schema changes (Create, Alter, and Drop) across your MySQL servers.

  • Proactive monitoring and advice on tuning the performance of your MySQL servers.

16.13.15: How are subscribers notified about the availability of new or updated MySQL Enterprise Monitor, MySQL Enterprise Advisors and Advisor Rules?

Customers will receive notifications of new and updated MySQL Enterprise Monitor and Advisors as they become available via the MySQL Enterprise Software Update Service. Notifications will be generated and sent based on the customer profile and the MySQL Enterprise subscription level.

MySQL Query Analyzer

Questions

  • 16.13.1: What is the MySQL Query Analyzer?

  • 16.13.2: How is the MySQL Query Analyzer installed and enabled?

  • 16.13.3: What overhead can I expect when the MySQL Query Analyzer is installed and enabled?

  • 16.13.4: Can I leave the MySQL Query Analyzer enabled at all times?

  • 16.13.5: What are the main features and benefits of the MySQL Query Analyzer?

  • 16.13.6: What are the typical use cases of the MySQL Query Analyzer?

  • 16.13.7: How are subscribers notified about updates to the MySQL Query Analyzer application components?

  • 16.13.8: What makes the MySQL Query Analyzer unique?

  • 16.13.9: How can I get the MySQL Query Analyzer?

  • 16.13.10: Does Query Analyzer work with MySQL Cluster?

  • 16.13.11: Does Query Analyzer capture queries by the root user?

  • 16.13.12: Does Query Analyzer enable me to monitor the disk reads and writes during a query?

  • 16.13.13: Does Query Analyzer handler prepared statements?

  • 16.13.14: How much degradation in performance does mysql-proxy introduce?

  • 16.13.15: Does the query analyzer look at all queries? or only queries which would show up in the in the slow-queries log?

  • 16.13.16: Does the "Rows" area show the rows returned/updated or the rows visited by the query?

  • 16.13.17: Do the MySQL clients have to connect to the port of the mysql proxy to enable the QA?

Questions and Answers

16.13.1: What is the MySQL Query Analyzer?

The MySQL Query Analyzer allows DBAs, developers and system administrators to improve application performance by collecting, monitoring, and analyzing queries as they run on their MySQL servers. http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/query.html

16.13.2: How is the MySQL Query Analyzer installed and enabled?

The Query Analyzer feature is installed with the Monitor Agent. It is enabled during agent installation and can be toggled between collection and pass-thru modes from the Query Analysis page of the Enterprise Monitor.

16.13.3: What overhead can I expect when the MySQL Query Analyzer is installed and enabled?

The average overhead when in active collection mode is in the 15-20% range. In pass-thru mode the overhead is minimal, weighing in at 1-5% on most MySQL systems of average load.

16.13.4: Can I leave the MySQL Query Analyzer enabled at all times?

We have customers who have the Query Analyzer enabled and collecting queries on their development and QA servers so they can tune their code and monitor the fixes as part of the development process. For production systems, Query collection and analysis can easily be toggled on when a slowdown occurs. To avoid collection mode overhead many users are using simple scripts to enable the Query Analyzer to sample queries during nonpeak hours, typically during 30 minute windows. They can then view the collected queries using the date/time or interval filter options.

16.13.5: What are the main features and benefits of the MySQL Query Analyzer?

For the complete features and benefits, visit the http://www.mysql.com/products/enterprise/monitor-features.html

16.13.6: What are the typical use cases of the MySQL Query Analyzer?

The typical use cases for developers, DBAs and system administrators are:

  • Developers – Monitor and tune application queries during development before they are promoted to production.

  • DBAs and System Administrators – Identify problem SQL code as it runs in production and advise development teams on how to tune. This use case benefits the most from regular sampling of queries as they are running, most often during nonpeak hours.

16.13.7: How are subscribers notified about updates to the MySQL Query Analyzer application components?

Customers will receive notifications of the MySQL Query Analyzer updates as they become available via the MySQL Enterprise Software Update and Alert Service. Notifications will be generated and sent based on the customer profile and the MySQL Enterprise subscription level.

16.13.8: What makes the MySQL Query Analyzer unique?

Other products (free, open source and commercial) that provide MySQL query monitoring are dependent on the MySQL Slow Query Log being enabled and available for sampling. While this provides some time savings over the DBA collecting and parsing the Log, the Slow Query Log comes with overhead and does not capture sub millisecond executions. The log data also grows very large very quickly.

The MySQL Query Analyzer collects queries and execution statistics with no dependence on the SQL Query Log, it captures all SQL statements sent to the MySQL server and provides an aggregated view into the most expensive queries in number of executions and total execution time. It is also fully supported as part of the MySQL Enterprise subscription.

16.13.9: How can I get the MySQL Query Analyzer?

The MySQL Query Analyzer is available for download to MySQL Enterprise customers at the Gold and Platinum subscription levels.

  • To experience the MySQL Enterprise Monitor for 30 days, visit the http://www.mysql.com/trials/enterprise

  • To buy MySQL Enterprise, visit the Online Shop

16.13.10: Does Query Analyzer work with MySQL Cluster?

Yes, providing that exact node is monitored with an agent and query analyzer has been enabled for that node. Note that you must be accessing your cluster data through a standard MySQL node for this to work.

16.13.11: Does Query Analyzer capture queries by the root user?

Yes, Query Analyzer captures all queries by all users providing that the queries are sent through the proxy port configured by the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Agent.

16.13.12: Does Query Analyzer enable me to monitor the disk reads and writes during a query?

No, that information is not available to be shown at this time.

16.13.13: Does Query Analyzer handler prepared statements?

At this time, the query analyzer does not track server-side prepared statements. However the default configurations for most client-side libraries for MySQL don't use them, they emulate them client-side, and those will be tracked by the query analyzer.

16.13.14: How much degradation in performance does mysql-proxy introduce?

At the very least it's equivalent to a network hop in latency. The degradation is directly related to your average query execution time. If your queries execute in microseconds (which can happen if served from query cache) then the degradation will be higher, and noticeable. We've seen some applications that actually do work when they execute queries, the degradation is much less, and in some limited cases because of scheduling, the application actually has better throughput.

16.13.15: Does the query analyzer look at all queries? or only queries which would show up in the in the slow-queries log?

The Query Analyzer sees all queries that you route through the agent/proxy that performs the query analysis and aggregate them directly.

16.13.16: Does the "Rows" area show the rows returned/updated or the rows visited by the query?

Returned/updated. We don't have visibility into how many rows were touched. at an instance level. Some of the graphs we provide will show you when you're queries are touching a lot of rows.

16.13.17: Do the MySQL clients have to connect to the port of the mysql proxy to enable the QA?

Yes, or you can re-direct them in various ways, by reconfiguring mysqld to listen to some other port, and the proxy to 3306, use iptables redirection, etc. We have some examples in the manual for the product on how to do it (semi)-transparently.